Category: vixdhesusxcr

Not fine by me

first_imgElsewhere, the money goes towards bursary funds. Peter Mitchell, St. Hugh’s Dean, explained that, “All decanal fines at St Hugh’s are directed into the funds available to the College for student hardship cases.”Despite this justification, one St Hugh’s student who was fined £150 for mess and £150 for an accidentally smashed window said, “I would have rather done community service than paid a fine, because £300 for me affected me more substantially than it would have done someone in a more stable financial position.’‘My money went to a hardship fund but now I’m £300 out of pocket I’m suffering hardship.”He added, “The college tries to make it seem like an official procedure, but it seemed to me that similar offences produce varying punishments.”Similar confusion about what consequences to expect for a single offence is also evident at other colleges.A spokesperson for Worcester said that decanal responses ranged from, “requests to send letters of apology, cost of repairing damage, fines, community service and requirement to improve academic standards”.Few colleges said that they had a standardised system of punishments for specific misdemeanours, although some, such as Brasenose, make exact figures available. BNC’s Student Handbook details the penalties their students should expect should they break the rules. For example “kindling of naked flames” carries a fine of £100.Even when outlined, college decanal systems are often inconsistent with one another. While Brasenose students can expect a £100 fine for climbing on college buildings, at Jesus in the academic year 2009-10, a student was left £150 poorer for the same offence.Nick Seaford, a St John’s student, was fined £50 for tampering with a fire alarm, whereas St. Catz records a punishment of “1 hour community service, suspended, for removing battery from room’s fire-alarm”. In another incident, a St Anne’s student only received a £30 suspended fine for “setting off the fire alarm by cooking in my room”.Seaford, a first year, said he thought it was “reasonable” for colleges to respond to incidents in different ways. He said, “I think it’s fair enough … it depends on the atmosphere and the ethos of the college”.This is true of Mansfield, whose “progressive, informal environment” and “relatively small student body” makes punitive action a last resort. Dr Eleftheriadis, Mansfield’s Dean, said, “When things get very wrong, which is very rare, a fine will be the appropriate response.’‘But I have found that our students are always reasonable. I have very rarely been called to intervene.”He added, “There is no ‘community service’ or other ‘forced labour’ form of punishment, nor indeed any form of coercion. I try to resolve issues through discussion with the parties involved and by encouraging those involved to apologise or otherwise make up for their mistakes.” [mm-hide-text]%%IMG_ORIGINAL%%3318%%[/mm-hide-text]Graphics: Nick Taylor An investigation by Cherwell has uncovered vast discrepancies between decanal punishments at different colleges.Fines levied for offences in recent years range from an average of £62 per year at St Catz to a colossal £2,447 at St Edmund Hall.The figures from the sample of colleges which replied to Cherwell’s Freedom of Information request suggest that cumulatively, undergraduate colleges across the University are likely to collect around £30,000 in fines over the current academic year.By far the largest proportion of punishments relate to behavioural offences and setting off fire alarms.University College’s records showed some particularly unexpected misdemeanours, such as a student who was punished in 2006 for having a bale of hay in their room.The fine imposed was “£20 plus £58.07 for cleaning”. Elsewhere, a student received a warning for keeping “chickens in student accommodation”.Fines for ICT misconduct are particularly steep, with Univ fining up to £200 a time for “the use of P2P software on the University network”, and charges related to file sharing accounting for 27% of the total amount raised in fines by Jesus since 2008.Univ also gave out three warnings to different students for “improper comments” on the Facebook group, “Univ Incoming Class 2010”.Illicit room parties also often result in a depleted bank balance or even an educational course. In February 2009, an “illegal party, excessive noise and smoking” resulted in one student from Univ being instructed to attend a “seminar with fire safety officer” and do “community service in the form of five sessions cleaning up the area around the recycling and rubbish bins outside the kitchen/works department.” The student in question was told, “Specifically, you will next week report to the Hall Manager in time to obtain rubber gloves and aprons and begin cleaning at 8am. You will absolve this task for 5 days (Monday to Friday inclusive).”Students looking forward to the tradition of “trashing” following exams this summer should also beware of severe penalties. Records showed that this can carry heavy fines, with some colleges regularly imposing £200 charges on students who flout the rules.In an apparently unique case, one St Anne’s student reported receiving a warning from the Dean for “having really loud sex and trashing my room”.Teddy Hall, the highest-grossing college of those surveyed admitted, “punishments are generally in the form of fines.”The current Teddy Hall Dean, Professor Robert Whittaker, commented that, “The level of the figures may perhaps reflect inclusion of reparation costs alongside fines in the strict sense.”He said, “Fines (in the broad sense, i.e. charges) go towards the costs incurred as a result of the action that resulted in the fine (e.g. replacing damaged fittings) and otherwise towards welfare.“Welfare and disciplinary provision and issues are interrelated, and as Dean I am keen to reflect on issues that arise and to work with the JCR and MCR to find ways to avoid repetition of problems and to ensure a responsive welfare system within the college.” ‘A student received a warning from the Dean for loud sex’ ‘Illicit room parties and excessive noise often result in fines’ Mary Kerr, Bursar of St. Hugh’s, which has been criticised in the past for its hefty financial penalties, told Cherwell, “We do not impose community service or other similar forms of punishment”.At other colleges however, a policy of community service is popular. St Hilda’s said of their decanal system, “There is a community service element in place which is always preferable to monetary fines.”Figures for St Catz show an average of 46 hours of community service a year given out as punishment since 2005. In a single year, 2005-06, 121 hours were doled out.As a result, income from fines are low, although the Home Bursar notes that, “Administrative charges (connected with car-parking without permit, computer network misuse, damage to property) are not recorded, unless punitive.”Offences at Catz include “misuse” of the car park, warranting 20 hours of community service, and “pranking another student”, which earned the culprit temporary exclusion from the bar.Other incidents brought harsher consequences; in 2007, two students were caught “throwing eggs in residence” and, as repeat offenders, were given “10 hours community service, barred from Entz [and] denied privilege of choosing a room in the following year”.Some students have said they would rather their college adopted a similar system of community service. One first year, who was fined for misbehaviour at another college and for mess, commented, “The financial punishments are unfair and extreme.’‘I asked to do community service or another form of punishment but this wasn’t allowed. There was no other option than to pay the £100 fine each time.”But some see fines as beneficial. Clifford Webb, Merton’s Finance Bursar, emphasised that money raised from student punishments was put to use. He said, “The College retains the income from fines that are imposed in respect to damage to College property.“All other fines, including fines of a purely disciplinary nature, are made available to the undergraduate common room and may be paid to charities nominated by them.”last_img read more

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In Short

first_imgDoughnut Week dealRegister for National Doughnut Week 2010 now, and get a voucher worth £5 off either a bag of Craigmillar Doughnut Concentrate or a box of Readi-Bake Topped Ring Doughnuts, from sponsor CSM UK. Taking place from May 8-15, the Week raises money for charity The Children’s Trust. Register online at www.nationaldoughnutweek.org. See insert in this issue.Back to schoolBettys Cookery School has set up a new website www.cookingforschools.co.uk which, as well as encouraging cooking skills, aims to encourage secondary school pupils to consider careers in the baking industry. Video clips of staff at Bettys Craft Bakery talking about their jobs and career progress can be viewed on the site. Bettys Cookery School currently works with Yorkshire schools, offering free bread-making classes to more than 330 pupils between the ages of eight and 16 every year.Hobbs’ breads onlineHobbs House Bakery is offering its breads nationwide through a new online shop. A sample box containing eight loaves supplied in a cloth bag and box, complete with freezer bags, can be ordered from the site as well as The Shepherds Loaf featured on BBC4’s programme In Search of the Perfect Loaf, which featured Hobbs House director Tom Herbert.Fedima symposiumFedima, the EU Federation of Bakery Ingredients Manufacturers, is hosting a symposium on ’Managing Food Safety Incidents and Traceability in the Bakery Chain’, from 22-23 April 2010 at the Sheraton City Hotel in Brussels. Speakers include EU Commission officials, representatives of European trade associations and lawyers.last_img read more

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Costa sales up 25%

first_imgCosta Coffee has reported a 25% increase in total sales for the 50 weeks to 16 February 2012.The high street coffee chain, part of the Whitbread group, also saw a 5.8% rise in like-for-like sales in UK equity stores during the same period, with transactions up 6.1%. It delivered positive trading results last year, as total system sales grew by 24.6% to £786m and franchise sales received a 19.3% boost, taking its total to £320m.In the 11-week period to 16 February 2012, the group also reported a 6.2% increase in UK like-for-like sales for the Costa brand, with total sales up 24.4%.Andy Harrison, chief executive of Whitbread, said: “Costa has delivered excellent results this year, with total sales increasing by 25%, driven by good like-for-like sales growth and record new store openings of 359 stores – 306 net total after closures. This includes 71 new stores in China, bringing our presence there to 163 stores.“We are approaching the first anniversary of the acquisition of Coffee Nation and the launch of Costa Express. We have been very pleased by the positive customer reaction and our growth plans for this business are ahead of our original expectations.”Costa opened 359 new outlets during this period, with almost half (177) opening in the UK and 182 stores internationally in locations such as India and China. It also reported a total of 919 UK Costa Express units, with the company continuing to rebrand a remaining 253 existing Coffee Nation units.Speaking of the group’s overall trading performance, Harrison added: “Whitbread has delivered good total sales growth of 11% for the year in difficult economic conditions, as we continue to invest in our strong brands. We expect to report in April another full year of double-digit earnings growth, in line with expectations.”last_img read more

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The Fearless Flyers Release New Single, “The Baal Shem Tov” Featuring Joey Dosik

first_imgThe Fearless Flyers are back with another new song, “The Baal Shem Tov”, from their upcoming second record, The Fearless Flyers II. The track is the second to be released, following “Flyers Direct“, and features Joey Dosik on sax.The new-ish Vulf Records project—which is produced and mixed by the “Vulfmon” himself, Jack Stratton (bandleader/multi-instrumentalist of Vulfpeck)—features bassist Joe Dart, guitarist Cory Wong, drummer Nate Smith, and Snarky Puppy guitarist Mark Lettieri.As they did on their 2018 debut record, The Fearless Flyers II appears to include spinoffs of original Vulfpeck compositions, including “Daddy, He Got A Cessna” (a play on “Daddy, He Got A Tesla”) and “Hero Town” (a song that originally appeared on 2017’s Mr. Finish Line). The six-track record also features two special guest collaborations with mandolinist/vocalist Chris Thile (Live From Here).The band has only performed together live once, at Concord Music Hall in Chicago, IL last fall during North Coast Music Festival. The set featured special guests including Jamiroquai singer Jay Kay and fellow Vulf collaborators Antwaun Stanley and Theo Katzman. The group has their second scheduled performance coming up at Madison Square Garden in New York City opening for Vulfpeck on Saturday, September 28th.Check out “The Baal Shem Tov” featuring some serious “sax n wah  one handed drums” below: The Fearless Flyers II Tracklisting:SIDE AFlyer DirectThe Baal Shem Tov (feat. Joey Dosik)Simon F15SIDE BDaddy, He Got a Cessna (feat. Chris Thile)Swampers (feat. Chris Thile)Hero TownView Tracklistinglast_img read more

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Chilled crops

first_imgAt planting, each young onion plant is placed by hand into fields. There can be as many as 80,000 onion plants per acre in a field. Tomatoes and peppers, however, generally have fewer than 10,000 plants per acre, Boyhan said.About 20 Vidalia onion varieties are grown in Georgia. They are known as short-day onions. They grow to maturity depending on the amount of sunlight in a day. Vidalias generally will start to bulb when days are about 11 hours long.ChilledWeather, so far, has been kind to Georgia peaches, too.Nature’s on track to give Georgia’s peach trees enough chill hours (hours below 45 degrees), said Kathy Taylor, a UGA Extension horticulturist. Depending on the variety, Georgia peach trees need between 400 and 1,100 chill hours to properly bloom in spring and produce fruits at the first of summer.Peaches in south Georgia have had 325 to 350 chill hours. That’s right on track, Taylor said, for most varieties there to get the 750 or so chill hours they need by Feb. 15, the usual end to the chill hour count.Middle Georgia peaches have had 550 to 575 chill hours. Again, that’s good news and adding up nicely. Most varieties there need around 1,100 hours before Feb. 15.Too many warm snaps like the days Georgia had over the holidays could reverse the beneficial effects of the chill hours. But Taylor doesn’t believe it will be a problem this year.Peach farmers are happy to get cold weather now. But freezing weather in late-March and in April has caused serious problems in the past. By Brad HaireUniversity of GeorgiaOne crop is soaking up the daylight and growing in fields. Another is quietly staying dormant in orchards. If all goes well, there should be plenty of Vidalia onions and Georgia peaches come harvesttime.Vidalia onion farmers started placing their plants into fields around Thanksgiving. Most were finished before the first of the year, said George Boyhan, a horticulturist with the University of Georgia Extension Service.Cool and dry”This year’s onion crop is in good shape right now,” Boyhan said. “Diseases are light and the weather so far has generally been good to them.”Boyhan figures growers planted about 14,000 acres this year, about 1,000 acres more than last year.Onions prefer cool, dry weather. But cold snaps in February and March can damage maturing onions.The onion harvest begins around April and runs through June. Not all onions are sent directly to stores. Some are stored. Most stored Vidalias are sold by September, though. Sweet onions from other parts of the world usually hit the U.S. markets in October.However, you might find some young, fresh Vidalia onions in stores right now.Vidalia onions that were planted in August are now being sold as salad onions in some grocery stores. These onions aren’t fully matured and are much like large green onions, or scallions.last_img read more

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Many mosquitoes

first_imgIf he had a choice, Gray would choose to see heavy rainfall and high populations of Asian tiger mosquitoes. By Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaGeorgia’s rainfall deficit has caused a mosquito population explosion that has led to a rise in the number of West Nile virus cases reported in the state. The virus is carried by the southern house mosquito, which breeds in storm drains and thrives in polluted water, said Elmer Gray, an entomologist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Storing rainwater to use to irrigate outdoor plants is wise. But it creates perfect backyard mosquito habitats, she said. “Unfortunately, rain-collecting containers tend to support large populations of some of our most pestiferous mosquito species,” Hinkle said. “In fact, the southern house mosquito is also known as the rain-barrel mosquito.” “Ticks are hardy, and their leathery skin and water-conserving behaviors protect them from the ill effects of drought,” Hinkle said. “And because fleas are so well-adapted and so dependent on their host, they aren’t usually affected, either.” “I’ll take a few bites over an illness any day,” he said. “Mosquito-vectored diseases can be a really serious health problem for you and your family.”Ticks and fleas constant Mosquitoes are vectors of WNV, but birds are carriers. The mosquitoes become infected when they feed on infected birds. Infected mosquitoes then transmit the virus to humans through their bites.WNV cases up in Georgia Ticks and fleas don’t seem to mind droughts. Asian tiger mosquitoes are what Gray refers to as “nuisance” mosquitoes, but they are not vectors of WNV. They show up at backyard picnics and other social gatherings. This mosquito breeds in standing water found in old tires, buckets or anything that will hold rainwater. Last year, nine cases of West Nile virus were reported in Georgia, he said. So far, 24 cases have been confirmed this year. And Gray is confident this number will keep rising. “These mosquitoes are found in urban areas such as Atlanta and Athens,” he said. “If you live on the coast or your property backs up to a swamp, you could have one of several species.”Man-made habitatsGray’s colleague Nancy Hinkle, also a UGA entomologist, says homeowners have actually helped Asian tiger mosquitoes overcome the lack of rainfall. “We haven’t had much heavy rain this summer to flush out the storm drains (and wash away the mosquito larvae),” Gray said. “If we’d been hit by hurricanes and heavy rains, the storm drains would be flushed out, but buckets and tires would be full for the Asian tiger mosquitoes to breed in.”Only biters “Because people have irrigated their lawns more, water-holding vessels such as flowerpots, buckets and cans around homes have been regularly collecting water,” Hinkle said. “People recognize the value of every drop of rain, and more and more people have fashioned rain-collection devices.”last_img read more

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AREC 2019: Don’t play blame game if you want to succeed

first_imgAREC 2019 keynote speaker Scott Dutton.A conflict whisperer says kicking furniture might work for some people’s stress but it’s no way to succeed in any market. Here’s how he advised a mayor to tackle that.Byron Bay-based Scott Dutton, founder of mediation advisory firm Fighting Fair, said one of his trickiest negotiations was 10 parties in a country town where the mayor kicked two chairs and stormed out in a temper.Rather than be shocked, the rest of those in the negotiations were unsurprised at the reaction, saying it was normal. MORE AREC 2019: Ditch the ‘oxygen thieves’ Mr Dutton, who has trained more than 15,000 professionals to handle difficult conversations, told the AREC Conference on the Gold Coast that there were three traps to avoid. “What happens when we fall into these traps? It creates disconnection. We lose the ability to relate, empathise and communicate with the other.”He said maintaining that connection could be put down to several things including having an open mindset, focusing on understanding rather than an outcome, and sharing perspectives.“Connection is key,” he said. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus12 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market12 hours agoAREC 2019 was held at the Gold Coast Convention & Exhibition Centre. Picture: SOPHIE FOSTER“How does it get to the stage where people are throwing furniture and why can’t they have those difficult conversations earlier. Moving from difficult to connective conversations, there are three key traps to avoid,” he said.The biggest trap was laying blame, activating the fight or flight response in our brains.“The reptilian brain, when we feel threatened that’s where we go. When we are (there) it’s hard to think clearly. Blame is our reptilian response when we’re in stress.”The second trap was not recognising that there were multiple perspectives to every situation and the third was making judgments and assumptions without having all the information necessary. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow much do I need to retire?00:58center_img Life lessons from escaping a bomb blast FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON TWITTER How to survive in a tough property marketlast_img read more

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Tekmar Group companies produce PPE during Covid-19

first_imgSubsea Innovation and Tekmar Energy are now producing between 150 and 200 protective face shields a day and will distribute them at no cost to local NHS trusts. Tekmar Group companies, Subsea Innovation and Tekmar Energy, have joined forces to manufacture personal protective equipment (PPE) for NHS workers in the North East of England. Recognising the limitations of using 3D printers to produce the face shields in quantity, the design team developed a design that can be cast in polyurethane and manufactured in greater numbers with sister company Tekmar Energy. Subsea Innovation designed, prototyped and began manufacturing the protective face shields using 3D printing technology. center_img Subsea Innovation and Tekmar Energy have responded to the coronavirus pandemic and have begun manufacturing protective face shields for front line NHS workers at their facilities in Darlington (Subsea Innovation) and Newton Aycliffe (Tekmar Energy). James Richie, Tekmar Group CEO said, “Tekmar Group is fortunate in that we have the capability to expand our operations and produce protective face shields for the NHS during this period of unprecedented demand. The Tekmar family are driving this initiative forward and they continue to demonstrate fortitude, determination and compassion during these difficult times.”last_img read more

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Remuera brothel forced to close by neighbours

first_imgAuckland Now 7 Dec 2011A brothel in suburban Remuera has been successfully shut down thanks to the persistence of neighbours. Neighbours fought for three months to get rid of the illegal Asoct Ave brothel. They took photos, jotted down car registrations and took notes of the comings and goings – and now their hard work has paid off. ”It’s very satisfying to know that it’s not in our front yard,” says one neighbour. ”We certainly knew it wasn’t happy families across the road. There were all types of unsavoury characters at all times of the day and night.”Auckland Council resource consents manager David Oakhill confirmed the business has stopped operating. ”The brothel at Ascot Ave has closed as a result of an investigation carried out by Auckland Council staff. We found the business that was operating from the address to be unlawful and as a result an abatement notice was issued requiring the activity to cease,” he says. ”The operators of the business complied with the notice and ceased the activity at this location. We are currently considering the option of further enforcement action.” The neighbour says it took about three months of residents gathering evidence and liaising with the council before the tenants were ordered to stop. She says they called the landlord, informed Auckland Council and the Orakei Local Board and talked to others who had faced the same problem. She says the key was to take the initiative and create ”bottom-up community pressure”.http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/6099206/Auckland-brothel-forced-to-closeResidents’ action shuts brothel in RemueraNZ Herald 8 Dec 2011An unlicensed brothel in Remuera has closed after neighbours collected evidence that included men paying for sex after church on Sunday. Acting on evidence collected by a neighbourhood support group, the Auckland Council investigated and found the brothel at Ascot Ave did not have resource consent. City officials issued an abatement notice ordering the bordello to cease operating. When council officers visited the property a week later, the $1 million-plus home was empty. One of the neighbours who collected evidence said they received an anonymous letter saying there were illegal immigrants working as prostitutes at the house. The letter gave telephone numbers for the Asian woman running the brothel. “We were very unhappy about having a brothel in our neighbourhood. There were men hanging around, people coming to our doors and knocking looking for the prostitutes. They were blocking the road … and even parking in the St Aidan’s Anglican Church carpark [on Remuera Rd]. “It is unbelievable the men that come and go. Young, old, every nationality you can imagine. Some in their turbans after church on a Sunday,” said the neighbour, who did not want to be named.Tomorrow, the council’s regulatory and bylaws committee will consider the issue of reviewing the brothels and commercial sex premises bylaws inherited from the seven former territorial councils. On the vexed issue of the location of brothels, a number of local boards do not want them or other commercial sex premises in residential areas and think there should be a minimum distance from schools and churches. The Prostitutes Collective and some in the sex industry want the industry to be self-regulated.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10771736Remuera residents applauded for brothel shut downNewstalk ZB 8/12/2011A group of Remuera residents is being applauded by a family rights group for having an illegal brothel shut down…Family First’s Bob McCoskrie says families shouldn’t be exposed to the unsavoury characters connected to brothels. He says residents in Green Lane, Albany and Christchurch share similar concerns, but haven’t been able to get the councils and the police on board.http://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/newsdetail1.asp?storyID=210590last_img read more

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Carol Ann Maune, age 80, Cedar Grove

first_imgCarol Ann Maune, age 80, of Cedar Grove, Indiana died Tuesday May 7, 2019 at St. Andrews Health Campus in Batesville, Indiana.Born July 22, 1938 in Franklin County, Indiana she was one of two children born to the late Oscar & Mildred (Stenger) Bischoff.  On August 11, 1962 she was united in marriage to Alvin W. Maune, and he preceded her in death on July 6, 2014.She was retired, having worked for the United States Postal Service in Cedar Grove, Indiana for many years.  She was a member of St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church in Brookville, and a longtime member of the former Holy Guardian Angels Parish in Cedar Grove.Survivors include nieces & a nephew.In addition to her parents, and husband, Alvin, she was preceded in death by her son Darren Maune, who died November 16, 2016; as well as one brother Ralph Bischoff.Friends may visit Saturday, May 11, 2019 from 10:00 A.M. until 11:00 A.M. at Holy Guardian Angels Oratory, 405 U.S. Highway 52, Cedar Grove, Indiana.Rev. Vincent P. Lampert will officiate the Mass of Christian Burial at 11:00 A.M., Saturday, May 11, 2019, Holy Guardian Angels Oratory.  Burial will then follow in Holy Guardian Angel Cemetery in Cedar Grove.Memorial Contributions may be directed to the Cedar Grove Volunteer Fire Department or Holy Guardian Angels Cemetery.The staff of Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home are honored to once again serve the Maune family, to sign the online guest book or send personal condolences please visit www.phillipsandmeyers.com .last_img read more

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