Category: swhujeiwdmod

IS IT TRUE JULY 11, 2017

first_img IS IT TRUE that the whole dust up over the Reverend Adrian Brooks of the Memorial Baptist Church calling Evansville DMD Director Kelley Coures a liar over a $300,000 subsidy to purchase the building that the now shut down grocery store has taken an interesting turn?…that Reverend Brooks being the gentleman that he is has acknowledged that Director Coures was truthful with his statement?…that came after a document bearing both of their signatures was unearthed?…the whole sordid tale of the grocery building is a long and sad one where two banks and a couple of public agencies were owed nearly $1.2 Million on mortgages against the property?…it has been reported that the non-profit that Brooks heads bought the property for a total of $400,000 meaning that the lenders took it in the shorts to the tune of $800,000?…it also seems that the $300,000 plus an additional $150,000 for inventory at the store came from the taxpayers meaning that the Reverend Brooks leveraged the start-up of the grocery store in a manner that would have made President Trump blush back in his “Art of the Deal” days?IS IT TRUE the list of losers is long on the failed grocery store venture and the least of the losers is the Memorial Community Development Corporation that came out better than the others by leveraging debt and negotiating like a pro to get the original lenders to take a short payoff?…seemly the biggest losers here are the taxpayers of Evansville who were unwillingly dragged to the table by the City of Evansville not once, not twice, but three times to subsidize a losing business?IS IT TRUE that the news cycle has gone mute on who is responsible for the potential million dollars in expenses incurred by the City of Evansville because the North Main road was designed/installed six inches too narrow?…this is not a small cost to absorb by the taxpayers because someone failed to pay attention to things like the width of a bus and codes?…someone’s head ought to roll over this amateurish mistake that ranks up there with the truck that got stuck on Diamond Avenue in an overpass and the ballfields where the base paths were designed wrong?…there must be a ruler shortage in Evansville because this sort of thing seems to happen all of the time?IS IT TRUE we highly recommend that members of the Evansville City Council do a financial assessment on how much of the taxpayer dollars did DMD Director Kelley Coures really spend to purchase the vacant and dilapidated CVS building located on North main?IS IT TRUE its time for members of the Evansville City Council to conduct a financial assessment on how much money has DMD Director Kelley Coures give or loan to questionable for-profit and/or not-for-profit businesses without proper vetting since he was appointed to this position by Mayor Winnecke?IS IT TRUE we wonder what committee, group or individuals gave DMD Director Kelley Coures permission to loan a not-for-profit organizations without proper vetting?IS IT TRUE that for the first time in 3 years the State of Illinois has a budget that passed?…it is a terrible budget with deficit spending and most likely full of crony deals but it is a budget?…Illinois now has an approved plan to head down the highway to hell in a handbasket as opposed to recent history when they simple lived day to day like a coyote on the same highway?…we are sure they are high fiving from Springfield to Chicago for what will surely be called a milestone accomplishment?Todays READERS POLL question is: Who has done a better job of handling our tax dollars?Please take time and read our newest feature articles entitled “LAW ENFORCEMENT, READERS POLL, BIRTHDAYS, HOT JOBS” and “LOCAL SPORTS” posted in our sections.  You now are able to subscribe to get the CCO daily.If you would like to advertise in the CCO please contact us City-County [email protected] County Observer has been serving our community for 15 years.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Free Rabies Clinic Set for Jan. 24 in Ocean City

first_imgThe City of Ocean City will host a free rabies clinic for dogs and cats 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Jan. 24, at 550 Asbury Avenue (adjacent to the Ocean City Fire Department).New Jersey State Statute 4:19-15.1 and City Ordinance 87-17, Sec. 11-1 require that any person owning, keeping or harboring a dog of licensing age (7 months or older) or which possesses a set of permanent teeth shall in the month of January and annually thereafter procure a license and official metal tag for each dog owned from the Municipal Clerk’s Office.In order to receive a dog license, the dog owner must first supply a rabies vaccination certificate signed by a licensed veterinarian indicating that the animal’s duration of immunity extends throughout at least the first 10 months of the 12-month dog licensing period for that municipality.Dog Licenses will be available for purchase at the time of the clinic. Licenses for dogs that are spayed or neutered are $5.20; dogs not neutered or spayed are $8.20. Please bring your renewal letter with you.For further information, please call the City Clerk’s Office at 609-525-9328, Monday through Friday, 8:45 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.— News release from the City of Ocean Citylast_img read more

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Ocean City Block Party Draws 25,000 People

first_imgAsbury Avenue was turns into a huge, pedestrian mall for the day. By Donald WittkowskiWhen it comes down to her choosing between Ocean City, New Jersey, and Ocean City, Maryland, Baltimore resident Patricia Haley has some strong opinions that might surprise the people in her home state.“I make sure my clothes say Ocean City, New Jersey, instead of Ocean City, Maryland,” she said, referring to the words embossed on her garments.Haley, who grew up in Wildwood before becoming a Baltimore transplant, continues to have an allegiance to the Jersey Shore, not Maryland’s Eastern Shore.On Saturday, she was among an estimated 25,000 people who crammed Asbury Avenue for Ocean City’s annual spring block party, an event that gives the town a jump-start for the peak summer tourism season.Asbury Avenue is closed to motor vehicle traffic between Fifth and 14th streets for the block party, turning the heart of the downtown shopping district into a gigantic, outdoor pedestrian mall for the day. This year, a record 500 vendors lined the street and sidewalks to add to a festive atmosphere that included plenty of food and live music.Now in its 35th year, the block party has grown from relatively humble beginnings into one of the top events in May for Cape May County. In October, Ocean City will do it all over again with its annual fall block party.The block party was the centerpiece of a weekend trip to Ocean City by Baltimore resident Patricia Haley.Haley, who had heard raves about the block parties, decided that she would finally attend one. So, she booked a room for the weekend at the Seaport Inn Motel on Wesley Avenue and made the drive up from Baltimore.“This is my happy place. I like it because it’s so family-friendly. There’s something about the Jersey Shore that causes the stress to melt away,” said Haley, who vacations in Ocean City each year.She noted that she lived frugally for the past month to save up enough money for a shopping spree at the block party. She peered into her shopping bags at all of the clothes, wallets, soaps and decorative crystal stones she bought on Saturday.“I really like the avenue,” Haley said of Asbury Avenue. “It’s nice to find so many bargains. Believe me, I am spending some money.”It looks as though she will continue to spend money in Ocean City. She said she has already made reservations at the Seaport Inn to come back for the fall block party and will return again in the spring of 2018.Haley is an example of the event’s drawing power. Michele Gillian, executive director of the Ocean City Regional Chamber of Commerce, said many out-of-towners plan weekend trips around the block party.Crowds packed the intersection of Ninth Street and Asbury Avenue in the heart of downtown.The economic impact of the event for the city is well into the millions of dollars, Gillian said. She also noted that hotels, motels, restaurants and retail shops around town use the block party to reopen for the summer season, after a winter hibernation.“It’s really a vital part of the kick-off for the summer season. It’s great,” Gillian said.The Chamber of Commerce, the block party’s principal organizer, partners with the downtown merchants and the city to run the event. Boardwalk businesses also benefit from the surge of visitors for the block party.“The Boardwalk is quite busy,” Gillian said.Downtown merchants reported doing brisk business Saturday, even though a forecast calling for some rain may have scared away some people. For the most part, the weather cooperated. Skies were partly sunny, with a stiff breeze and temperatures in the 60s.Ione Talese, right, the owner of Artisan Body Products, did strong business at a table outside her Asbury Avenue shop.Ione Talese, owner of Artisan Body Products, a shop on Asbury Avenue that sells lotions and soaps, said she was doing an “incredible” amount of businesses.“This is a really good spring block party. It’s really great, money-wise and crowd-wise,” Talese said. “We’re really lucky to have such a great downtown and great stores.”Talese characterized the event as huge for the local economy. Like Gillian, Talese said the block party provides a catalyst for the all-important summer season and also attracts many out-of-towners for weekend trips.With summer vacations on the horizon, the block party shoppers were snapping up warm-weather gear. Becky Friedel, owner of 7th Street Surf Shop, said she sold a lot of swimming suits, wet suits and sandals, along with some sweatshirts.“I had a line at the register all day,” Friedel said.Outside the Sun Seekers women’s clothing store on Asbury Avenue, Lissa Allegretto, of Absecon, and her sister-in-law, Mary Henry, of Ocean City, were hunting for some bargains on the racks of shirts lining the sidewalk.Asked if she was looking for anything in particular, Allegretto quipped, “Something that catches my eye.”“But I also like taking a walk down the avenue,” she added.She and 25,000 other Ocean City block party aficionados, it seems. That, by the way, is Ocean City, New Jersey, not Ocean City, Maryland.Live music kept the block party crowds entertained throughout the day.last_img read more

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STS9 Closes Wild Chattanooga Performance With “Luma Daylight > Tokyo” Encore [Photos]

first_imgLoad remaining images STS9 hit Track 29 in Chattanooga, Tennessee last night, continuing their tour with Modern Measure. For their Tuesday performance, the band certainly did not hold back, putting on a fiery midweek performance for the folks in Chattanooga. STS9 was dialed in from the start jamming “We’ll Meet In Our Dreams” through to “Kaya,” followed by a particularly jammy “F Word,” that let the crowd know they were in for a special show. The jams continued with “Out Of This World” sandwiching “Enceladus” before building into “Monkey Music,” then closing out the first set with “When The Dust Settles Reprise” and “Rise Above, Get Loud.”The setlist was one of dreams, with the second set similarly being stacked, kicking off with “Evasive Maneuvers” and “Be Pulse.” The group threw in a cover of Outkast’s “In Due Time” as a segue between “Totem” and “World Go Round,” in case people not present weren’t jealous enough of the magic happening down south. STS9 closed out the seven-song second set with “From Now On,” “Blu Mood,” and finally a massive “Arigato.” To end the night, for the encore, STS9 came back swinging with “Luma Daylight,” eventually morphing it into “Tokyo,” a relative rarity now a day that left the audience beyond hyped.You can check out a gallery from last night’s festivities below, courtesy of Christian Stewart, as well as the setlist from last night, courtesy of The Church of STS9. STS9 will continue to Oxford, Mississippi tonight for a performance at The Lyric Oxford before hitting Houston for two nights at the House of Blues.Setlist: STS9 | Track 29 | Chattanooga, TN | 4/25/2017Set One: WMIOD >> Kaya,  F Word*^, Out of This World >> Enceladus >> Out of This World >> Monkey Music, When The Dust Settles Reprise, Rise Above Get LoudSet Two: Evasive Manuvers*, Be Pulse, Totem >> In Due Time (Outkast Cover) >> World Go Round, From Now On, Blu Mood, ArigatoEncore: Luma Daylight >> TokyoShow Notes: *^ Insane jam in F. Word, * Evasive Manuvers had a cool Modular Jam [Video courtesy of Matt Brady]last_img read more

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Screams from Greek stage aim for doctors’ hearts

As medical technologies extend the lives of the sickest, medical schools across the country have struggled to find a way to help doctors better navigate new moral quandaries around death and dying. The recent performance of scenes from Greek plays at Harvard Medical School represents one of the more unusual and emotionally powerful approaches…Read more here

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The ants come marching

first_img“To know them is to love them,” proclaimed the big-screen slide projected behind Aaron Ellison at the Harvard Museum of Natural History.  That’s not a description usually associated with ants.A senior research fellow in ecology at Harvard Forest, Ellison was discussing his new book, “A Field Guide to the Ants of New England,” to an enthusiastic crowd that included members of the Harvard community and local fans of ecology.Beginning Thursday’s lecture, he asked for a show of hands: How many in the audience had taken a magnifying glass to ants on the sidewalk when they were young? Nearly a third raised their hands — almost all men, he pointed out, joking that it was a non-gender-neutral question.He flipped through his first few slides, of an ant farm from decades past, to an image of two human feet covered in ants. The air was sucked out of the room when the latter appeared, with the creepy-crawly horror it audibly invoked from the group.He quickly moved on. “It took an anthill” said another slide, and Ellison acknowledged his co-authors, including the book’s chief photographer, Gary Alpert, research associate at Harvard’s Museum of Comparative Zoology, and recently retired from Harvard’s Environmental Health and Safety Department. The other co-authors are Nicholas J. Gotelli, professor of biology at the University of Vermont, and Elizabeth J. Farnsworth, senior research ecologist at the New England Wild Flower Society.Ellison then delved into the importance of ants — and not just because, according to Alpert, Harvard happens to have the largest private collection of them in the world.Aaron Ellison and interns from The Nature Conservancy’sLeaders in Environmental Action for the Future (LEAF) program setting up ant sampling plots on Block Island. Photo by Elizabeth FarnsworthAnts, Ellison explained, turn over soil, bringing it up from as deep as two meters beneath the Earth’s surface. There are no earthworms native to New England, he said, or anywhere north of where the glaciers were. It is the ants that have spent the past 15,000 years making New England’s rich topsoil, one inch every 250 years.“No ants? No farms. No food,” he said.Ants also clean up the forest for us. Insects such as caterpillars, moths, and beetles die all the time, but ants are one of the reasons “we are not face deep in insect carcasses when we walk through the forest.”They also disperse about a third of the seeds of New England’s spring flowering woodland herbs.New England has 132 kinds of ants. Ellison said that approximately 14 are “tropical tramps” non-native to New England, and that there are probably closer to 150 or 160 different species, with 11 hiding around the region’s borders.The book is designed to be easy to follow, much like a field guide to birds. It has photographs of the ants in their natural habitats, and illustrations with guidance arrows showing where to look for identification, as well as maps. The book is the first of its kind.He encouraged audience members to go into the field to collect ants themselves, and even to send samples in via the book’s website, to be added to the database. Ants are easy to collect, Ellison said. Using your fingers to pick them up, he said, place them in a vial with a little bit of alcohol so they die. (Tequila or gin works just fine if you “don’t have access to lab-grade ethanol.”) Record where you found them in a notebook, using GPS. You can even bring some cookies along, to eat yourself or as a sugary treat for the ants.The “Lady Gaga,” or Pyramica, ant. Photo by Gary Alpert“They’re cool to look at,” said Ellison. “They’ve got hairs and different colors and cool heads.”Indeed, the “Lady Gaga” ant, as he calls it (actually a Pyramica), has a big head and even a “skirt” that covers its behind.“Ants are a chemical organism,” explained Alpert. “The same amount of information we get visually, they get chemically.”And, they’re being watched closely these days, said Ellison, for their relationship with climate change.last_img read more

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Swanson: Domestic Violence A Concern As COVID-19 Crisis Continues

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),Help from the criminal justice system,you say….you let my felony stalker free as an FN corona spore…..I was delayed 6mths for my chance to see justice served…and never talked to you.we never even met.you let him stalk me,drug me,spit on me,and ultimately I was tossed like a china corpse,and knocked out…hed been arrested 30x in 6yrs for these same acts,and worse.n you set him free,whilst my ptsd keeps me isolated before this crap took over the world….THEY DONT CALL IT >CRIMINAL< JUSTICE《 FOR NOTHING.Our system is a farce,and heads up people,Jamestown has it's own Bill Cosby,n not the funny sweater,jello bill….the evil, sinister bill…..the real Bill….he is out there. Dont believe me,ask the Anew Center. MAYVILLE – Chautauqua County District Attorney Patrick Swanson says domestic violence is a specific problem that he’s concerned about as the global COVID-19 crisis continues.“These are high stressed times where people are going to struggle with their mental health,” Swanson said during a recent interview with WNYNewsNow. “That struggle with mental health, along with it comes strain at home. I just hope people can stay level headed. If someone is violating the law, I hope that person being abused is able to call and get protection from law enforcement and seek help from the criminal justice system.”The county’s chief prosecutor says the pandemic will cause a drop in crime throughout the county this year.“When people are being out and about, and businesses being open, those things breed the opportunity for people to commit criminal acts,” Swanson said. “When you’ve got the majority of people staying home, and the majority of businesses being closed, the opportunity to commit crime is far less. We’re going to see a dip in crime this year because of (the pandemic).” last_img read more

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Frost preparedness

first_imgby Emily Emshoff Many a gardener has spent a sunny October afternoon admiring his mums only to wake up the next morning to a winter wonderland and frostbitten flowers. Georgia’s first frost usually hits in the middle of November, but sometimes it sneaks into the state a little earlier. When it does, University of Georgia experts say it is good to have some supplies on hand and a game plan. One of the most effective ways to shield plants from frost is to cover them with any of a wide variety of materials, from high quality frost fabric, to blankets and sheets, to newspapers, baskets and straw. A supply of old comforters or heavy blankets — maybe purchased from local thrift store — will allow you to be ready for that first frost without spending much money. Gardeners should never use plastic sheeting to cover plants because plastic can trap too much heat when the day starts to warm up and actually cook or scorch the covered plant. It’s best to cover plants before sunset to retain some of the heat that is trapped in the soil and to remove the coverings in the morning to prevent the plants from suffocating. Simple mulches — like dead fall leaves or straw — are some of the best materials for protecting small plants and flowers, said Paul Thomas, a UGA Extension horticulturist. Gardeners can completely bury their flowers in either the leaves or straw, and then uncover them after the weather warms back up. The flowers will be fine, he said. Some gardeners save and store the first fallen leaves from their landscapes to use to protect their flowers from the frost during the fall or the next spring. “It sounds crazy, but if its your prize dahlia and you have a dahlia show coming up, then it’s definitely worth it,” Thomas said. There are also preventive measures you can take before the frost approaches. Stop fertilizing container gardens six to eight weeks before the first frost date. Finally, water plants two days before the frost is expected — or even the night before — because wet soil retains more heat than dry soil. Also add pine straw or other mulch to planting beds to keep your plant’s root systems from freezing. The same rules apply to vegetables. First, identify the plants that are most vulnerable to frost. If you’re lucky enough to still have tomatoes, cucumbers, beans, melons and squash growing in late October, keep in mind that they are very susceptible to frost damage. Many fall crops, like broccoli, pumpkins, carrots and beets, can handle a light frost. Whether the frost is expected, or not, it is important to be prepared and know what to do to save your garden. A few preventative measures and planning will keep you and your garden warm and happy.last_img read more

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Fruit Tree Varieties

first_imgThe best pear varieties for south Georgia include Hood, Floradahome, Baldwin, Spalding and Warren. In middle or north Georgia, plant Orient, Carrick Waite, Kieffer, Magness, Moonglow, Starking Delicious or Dawn.Japanese plum varieties recommended for home gardens in Georgia are Methley, Morris, AU Rubrum, AU Producer, Spring Satin, Byrongold and Rubysweet.For more information on planting a home orchard, see the UGA Extension publication at www.caes.uga.edu/publications/. Fall is the perfect time to add a home orchard to your landscape, but University of Georgia experts warn gardeners to read labels and select the right trees for their region.Small fruits such as blueberries and blackberries are actually very simple to grow and are great to start with and build confidence for the home orchardist. Growing trees is a bit more challenging. To increase your success rate, start with varieties bred especially for your region of the state.There are several apple varieties adaptable to most parts of Georgia. If you live in south Georgia, plant Anna or Dorsett Golden. Varieties that do well in the upper two-thirds of the state include Ginger Gold, Gala, Mollie’s Delicious, Ozark Gold, Golden Delicious, Mutzu, Yates and Granny Smith.Only a few fig trees are well adapted to Georgia. In the mountain region, select a protected site and try Celeste or Hardy Chicago. Celeste, Hardy Chicago and Conadria are fairly well adapted for the Piedmont. South of the Fall Line, any of the varieties mentioned can be grown, but Celeste and Conadria are two of the best. Extend the season by planting a late ripening variety like Alma.last_img read more

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Spain Study Abroad

first_imgTime abroad looks different for every student.Some are seasoned travelers looking to fuel their sense of adventure. For others, studying abroad is the first chance they’ve had to explore a new country.For University of Georgia poultry science major Logan Waldrop, embarking on a monthlong study abroad trip to Spain with the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) was his first time outside of the Southeastern U.S.“I had never been abroad before and the longest plane trip I had ever been on was an hour or two. The eight-hour flight and being in a country where English isn’t the first language was frightening,” Waldrop said.But traveling with the support of UGA’s faculty and fellow students helped to make the Franklin County, Georgia, native feel at home.“The minute I got there I felt welcomed and comfortable in the environment,” he said. “The trip overall exceeded my expectations tremendously.”After an eight-year run in France, the CAES Food Production, Culture and the Environment program moved to Granada, Spain, in May 2019. As a participant in the inaugural trip to Spain, Waldrop traveled with animal science Professor Michael Azain and now-retired UGA Professors Mark and Judy Harrison for a unique opportunity to learn about food production and culture in the Mediterranean region. He and other students attended lectures and visited production facilities for olive oil, cheese, Spanish ham, bread and wine.“Going to Alhambra was one of the coolest things that I got to do on this trip,” Waldrop said. “It was truly unique to see all of the different designs from the different people and different time periods, but my absolute favorite thing that we did on the trip was going down to Malaga on the Mediterranean. Getting to be on the coast and experiencing the culture was something I’ll never forget. Plus, the food was incredible.”It can be hard to achieve cultural immersion when studying abroad. It can be all too easy to stay comfortable in the groups you travel with, and it’s hard to get to know locals. Waldrop was able to overcome this barrier by staying with a host family.“The homestay was flawless,” said Waldrop. “I loved our host family and they took extremely good care of us. The food was absolutely incredible, and they were the sweetest people in the world.”Walking away from his time in Spain, Waldrop has two pieces of advice for future study abroad students.“The advice I would give is to get familiar with the language,” he said. “That was one of the bigger issues that I faced while over there. If you know you’re going, brush up on it. The other piece of advice I’d offer is to have fun. There were a few nights that I was a little homesick, but then we all decided to go do stuff in the city and all of that went to the back of my mind. Cut loose and have fun — there won’t be many opportunities like this one.”The deadline to apply for the CAES May term program, Spain: Food Production, Culture and the Environment is February 15. Interested students can find more information at www.caes.uga.edu/students/study-abroad.last_img read more

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