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In situ measurements of transionospheric VLF wave injection

first_imgVLF waves at 3.85 kHz from the Siple, Antarctica, transmitter were continuously measured by electric and magnetic receivers on a sounding rocket as the waves propagated through the neutral atmosphere and into the ionosphere. The change from linear to circular polarization was clearly observed along with severe attenuation of the VLF signal in the D region. Interferometric measurements established the index of refraction and provided an independent calibration of the rocket‐borne receivers. An upper bound on the VLF power radiated is estimated to be 1.7×10³ W during a period when the antenna was driven at 115×10³ W. The power estimated to be entering the ionosphere is between 3 W and 12 W and depends on assumptions concerning the geometrical distribution of wave power.last_img read more

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STUDY SHOWS CHILDREN IN THE TRI-STATE ARE MORE LIKELY TO FACE HUNGER THAN…

first_imgChild Food Insecurity Rates In Tri-State Food Bank’s Service Area Are Higher Than Overall Food Insecurity Rates Tri-State Food Bank announced the release of Map the Meal Gap 2019, the latest report by Feeding America® on food insecurity and the cost of food at both the county and congressional district level. It is the only study that provides food insecurity data at the local level.  Map the Meal Gap 2019 reveals that food insecurity exists in every county in Tri-State Food Bank’s service area. It also shows that children are more likely to be food insecure, with the child food insecurity rate at 17.7% compared to 13% for the overall population in the 33 counties in IL, IN, & KY of which Tri-State Food Bank serves.“There isn’t a single state or county in America free from child hunger, and it is within our collective power to change that and ensure that today’s children are tomorrow’s leaders,” said Claire Babineaux-Fontenot, chief executive officer of Feeding America. “The Feeding America nationwide network of food banks is investing in our nation’s future by helping to provide over 146 million meals to children every year. Still, Map the Meal Gap highlights that more must be done. Together food banks, corporations, policymakers, donors, volunteers and advocates can solve hunger.” “I encourage everyone to visit the website, map.feedingamerica.org to find out what hunger looks like in their community and get involved to be part of the solution,” Babineaux-Fontenot continued. “One way is to tell Congress to invest in kids during Child Nutrition Reauthorization legislation and increase access to food for kids during the summer. Your voice matters and we can make a difference.”Overall food insecurity in the Tri-State varies throughout the counties Tri-State Food Bank serves in Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky. Food insecurity rates in Illinois ranges from a low of 11% of the population in Edwards County up to 23% in Alexander County. The food insecurity rates in Indiana range from a low of 10% of the population in Dubois County up to 16% in Vanderburgh County. And food insecurity rates in Kentucky ranges from a low of 13% of the population in Livingston County up to 19% in Union County. Tri-State Food Bank Executive Director Glenn Roberts states, “It is positive news that, from 2016 to 2017, national and local food insecurity rates have dropped, and here in the Tri-State they decreased from 13.4% to 13.0% overall, and from 18.3% to 17.7% for children. Improved economic conditions mean that fewer people are living on the edge. However, 1 in 7 adults and 1 in 6 children still do not always know where their next meal is coming from, and this is unacceptable. And what hasn’t changed is the fervency of our work at Tri-State Food Bank because hunger continues to be a serious problem in this country, especially for our most vulnerable populations – our children, senior citizens, and those living in rural communities. Tri-State Food Bank is passionately committed to fill the gaps where hunger exists, and we invite the community to get involved in our mission by volunteering and/or making food or monetary donations.”Tri-State Food Bank is a member of Feeding America’s hunger-relief network comprised of 200 food banks and 60,000 food pantries and meal programs that together provides food assistance to more than 40 million people in the U.S. struggling with hunger.  Looking back at our work from 2018, Tri-State Food Bank distributed approximately 8.6M pounds of food (7.2M meals) through its 248 partner agencies and schools of which help carry out Kid’s Weekend BackPack food programs, Senior Meal programs, summer feeding sites, soup kitchens, and food pantries. During this time, we were able to serve over 110,000 unique individuals in the Tri-State through a 10% increase in distributions over 2017. Map the Meal Gap 2019 uses data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and food price data and analysis provided by Nielsen, a global provider of information and insights. The study is supported by The Howard G. Buffett Foundation, Conagra Brands Foundation and Nielsen. Key local findings:Child Food Insecurity in the Tri-State is nearly 1% higher than the national average (17.7% locally compared to 17% nationally)Overall Food Insecurity in the Tri-State is 0.5% higher than the national average (13% locally compared to 12.5% nationally)There are 34,990 Food Insecure Children in the Tri-StateThe study’s findings underscore the extent of need that remains in communities in the Tri-State area and across the U.S., despite national measures from the USDA that indicate overall improvement.Dr. Craig Gundersen, Professor of Agricultural and Consumer Economics at the University of Illinois, Executive Director of the National Soybean Research Laboratory and a member of Feeding America’s Technical Advisory Group is the lead researcher of Map the Meal Gap 2019. This is the ninth consecutive year that Feeding America has conducted the Map the Meal Gap study. The Map the Meal Gap 2019 interactive map allows policymakers, state agencies, corporate partners, food banks and advocates to develop integrated strategies to fight hunger on a community level.A summary of the findings, an interactive map of the United States, and the full report are available at map.feedingamerica.org. Join the conversation about Map the Meal Gap 2019 on Twitter using #MealGap.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Umphrey’s McGee Rages Night Two At First Avenue In Minneapolis

first_imgLoad remaining images Minneapolis, MN venue First Avenue has become a staple on Umphrey’s spring tour. Over the past ten years, Umphrey’s has played five multi-night runs there, and each have become legendary. Last night, April 29th, Umphrey’s McGee continued this tradition, amazing fans for their second straight night of rocking music. It never ceases to amaze how consistently this band brings an amazing rock-n-roll concert experience night in and night out. Any UM show at First Avenue can demonstrate that.The band opened the show with a standard “Room to Breathe” before hitting “Spires.” “Smell the Mitten” was the night’s first foray into improvisational territory, led by guitarist Jake Cinninger with some tight reggae-esque chords and a “Controversy” jam, continuing to honor Prince’s demise, the First Avenue location, and the previous night’s debut.One of the highlights of the first set was the rare(r) instrumental “All Things Ninja.” It definitely got the crowd moving, and Brendan Bayliss nailed his soaring solo. Drummer Kris Myers had his usual drum solo in the song, while Jake Cinninger and Ryan Stasik watched in awe and respect. “Full Frontal” was the newest song they played all night, and that jammed into a “Bad Friday” to close out the set. It was a fairly straight-forward first set that had some great moments.The second set, as per custom, was longer and more improvisational. Without a doubt, this second set was top-notch Umphrey’s McGee. Fan favorite “All in Time” started the set, and quickly went into jamming mode. They teased the “Super Mario Brothers” underground theme to the delight of video game nerds, and then Cinninger took the song in different directions with some very clever guitar licks. The jam slowly shifted towards the keyboards, and eventually keyboardist Joel Cummins was the only one playing. Unsurprisingly, with the lights all shining on him, he began to play his beautiful opus, “Kimble.” A beautiful and delicate song, the juxtaposition of that with “Tribute to the Spinal Shaft” following was interesting. “Tribute” had some good jams, and they made it other-wordly with a great Middle Eastern jam that sounded similar to the 2×2 from Chicago’s Auditorium Theatre show in 2008. It was definitely a very cool part of the show.Not staying too long in any direction, they then slowed down the music and began to play The Police’s “Walking on the Moon.” It was definitely a fun moment of the show as the whole crowd sang along. At the end of the song, Bayliss incited the crowd to sing the coda of “oooooooooooooooo, woooooohhhh woooooohhhh woooooohhhh.” He did a good job; the crowd was sang loudly in unison. In fact, he motioned to Cummins to stop playing the keys, so it was just the crowd singing without music for a couple measures. Bayliss had a huge smile on his face.The show continued at a blistering pace, with “Much Obliged” segueing into “Mrs. Robinson’s Strut” segueing into “Wappy Sprayberry,” all of which had great jamming. The latter tune went unfinished, and even that eventually led to the ending of “All in Time.” “All in Time” started meandering for a while, with Cinninger teasing “Baba O’Riley” before ending the set with the most beloved dueling guitar part of the UM repertoire. The whole thing was the righteous way to do a second set.The encore put an exclamation on the night. Anytime that “Front Porch” is played, one can be happy, but the encore slot highlights how much fun the band is, especially when it wasn’t on the set list to begin with. Great audible by the UM. But it wasn’t just that it was magnificently played, but they inserted a great “Waterfalls” jam in there. Everyone was singing the R&B hit by TLC! It was quite stunning how, despite probably not hearing the song since 1996, the lyrics just came instantly back. It was an awesome encore, one that exemplified how the band can treat an audience if they are really feeling the vibe.Tonight is the last night of the Spring Tour before heading out West to do their annual UMBowl for the Umphreaks. Check out the full setlist and a gallery of more images below:Setlist: Umphrey’s McGee at First Avenue, Minneapolis, MN – 4/29/16Set One: Room to Breathe, Spires > Smell the Mitten$, Morning Song, All Things Ninja, Full Frontal > Bad FridaySet Two: All In Time > Kimble, Tribute to the Spinal Shaft > Walking on the Moon, Much Obliged > Mrs. Robinson’s Strut > Wappy Sprayberry > All In TimeEncore: Front Porch%Notes:$ Controversy tease/jam% Waterfalls jamAll photos appear via Ojeda Photography; check out the full gallery below.last_img read more

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For her, home is the heart of the matter

first_imgThis is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.When Dana McKinney was a girl, her family drove every week from their small town in Fairfield County, Conn., to Sunday dinner at her grandmother’s home in Newark, N.J. To a child who loved dance and art, the changing scenery on those trips revealed stark contrasts that stung of economic inequality.“I was going back and forth between a very comfortable lifestyle in Connecticut to a very depressed environment in Newark and became really inspired to look at how people can affect the built environment,” McKinney said. “I want to be able to fix this! — That was my immediate reaction — I’ll be an architect!”After studying architecture at Princeton University, McKinney came to Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) in 2012 to earn master’s degrees in architecture and urban planning. It’s an unusual and demanding course of study, but one McKinney felt would merge her design work with her interest in social change, social justice, and the power of architecture to transform people’s lives.“I want to make beautiful spaces and buildings, but I don’t want … the pitfall of only working with elite clients, and I think a lot of times architects end up serving a very high-income population. A majority of housing is done by developers in the U.S., [so] good architecture barely reaches outside a certain economic class,” McKinney said.Much of her academic work has focused on how design and living interact: improving elderly housing and studying the effects from the abrupt closure in 2014 of a large homeless facility in Boston.But with one in four Newark residents likely to spend some time in prison, McKinney’s thesis focused on “sensible and sensitive” design alternatives to prison that would help break the cycle of incarceration and poverty. It was an unconventional choice. When she put her idea before her faculty advisers, “I could hear the crickets in the room,” she said. But “by the end of it, they were all about it.”While McKinney doesn’t believe architecture alone can end homelessness or poverty or incarceration, she does believe the field has something important to offer. “Everyone has a role in social development and in making sure that our society is a reflection of what we want it to be.”Indeed, though “spatial justice” is often thought of as an enterprise in the public realm, like the construction of parks and community centers, it’s not as frequently addressed in the private realm. Because housing is essential to well-being, McKinney hopes to eventually create spaces that promote not just equality, but equity. “Your self-worth and what you need to do well as a person starts with the safety and comfort you feel in your own home,” she explained.Outside the classroom, McKinney has been active in bringing together African-American students at GSD and shining a spotlight on black women and men in a field where only 1 percent of architects are African-American.Having sometimes found herself one of only two black students in a class of 80, McKinney was among the earliest members of the African-American Student Union five years ago, serving last year as its president. The group grew from six to 30 members, promoting the work of black design professionals, doing outreach to high school students considering architecture as a career, strategizing ways GSD could recruit more black students, and offering guidance to prospective applicants.Perhaps most important, the group afforded its members respite from feelings of isolation. “For a lot of us, it made life at Harvard go by a little bit faster [to] know that we had a really supportive community for one another,” McKinney said.In 2013, McKinney and some of her classmates orchestrated a clandestine visit to Harvard by rapper Kanye West and his wife, Kim Kardashian. West, who started a design firm in 2012, spoke privately to students about his interest in architecture and his belief that design “can save the world.” (This started with the hand-delivery of an invitation to West’s lawyer in New York. McKinney said, “There was maybe about a month of lag, and then on a Thursday afternoon, we get a phone call from Kanye’s … manager, who said, ‘He’s going to be here on Sunday. He has a concert in Boston. You have two hours.’ And he came!”)In 2015, McKinney helped organize the School’s first Black in Design conference. The event hosted hundreds of designers, architects, and urban planners from across the country to showcase their work, share experiences, and discuss issues in the field. It was so successful that a second conference is planned for the fall.With her graduate work complete, McKinney moved to Los Angeles in March to work as an architectural designer for Frank Gehry, the Pritzker Prize-winning architect.After spying Gehry, GSD ’57, Ar.D. ’00, sitting alone during his visit last spring to receive the 2016 Harvard Arts Medal, McKinney struck up a conversation about architecture and community development. She left with his phone number and a request to call when she graduated. Although best known for splashy, undulating structures that disrupt the surrounding landscape, Gehry also has been credited with bringing about social change by jump-starting local economic and cultural revitalization efforts wherever he builds.For McKinney, leaving Harvard for this next chapter has been exhilarating — and emotional.“I feel like I’ve made an impact on the School and I think the School’s made an incredible impact on me, my worldviews … re-engaging me in things that I hadn’t really thought about in the past few years. Also, it’s given me much more of a voice,” she said, reflecting on her many leadership roles.“I’ve really come into my own and have been so incredibly thankful and fortunate to have had that experience.”last_img read more

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Record 4.2 tons of cocaine seized near French Caribbean

first_imgSAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — Officials with the French army stationed in the Caribbean islands of Martinique and Guadeloupe say they seized a record 4.2 tons of cocaine in nearby waters. The Armed Forces of the Antilles said Wednesday that  it found the 177 bricks of cocaine aboard a fishing vessel in the Atlantic Ocean on Jan. 17. Eight people aboard the vessel were arrested. Authorities say the seizure was a result of close cooperation with several countries that it did not identify. No further details have been released.last_img read more

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Siemens Gamesa building hybrid wind-battery storage project in the Philippines

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享ReNews.biz:Siemens Gamesa is working on a hybrid energy project for Berkeley Energy in the Philippines that will combine an existing 16MW wind farm, battery storage and an in-house central control system managing the energy produced at the plant.The project is at Puerto Galera on the island of Mindoro and will provide a stable electricity supply in a location with a weak link to the grid, reducing its dependence on diesel.The plant is expected to be in full operation in the second half of 2020, following the recent signing of a supply and five-year maintenance contract including the Siemens Gamesa hybrid plant controller (HPC) system. The HPC system manages the power generated and stored at the plant and can fine tune the wind turbines to optimise the entire plant’s performance.The wind farm has been fully installed, comprising eight Siemens Gamesa 2MW turbines, while the 6MW Gamesa Electric lithium battery storage system will be set up and commissioned later this year.Siemens Gamesa said that an additional wind farm is also being negotiated, which would increase capacity by 10MW pending the issuance of appropriate approvals from the Department of Energy and other government agencies.“The plant represents a significant technological advance towards making renewables an energy source that can be used on demand,” Siemens Gamesa said.More: Siemens Gamesa delivers Philippines hybrid Siemens Gamesa building hybrid wind-battery storage project in the Philippineslast_img read more

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Measuring ROI: Using data to track mobile banking

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Mobile banking, which less than a decade ago felt like an idea from Robert Zemeckis’ Back to the Future, is now a widespread practice throughout the banking industry. The “big four” banks, CFI’s, and everyone in-between stand to benefit from the move to mobile devices but CFI’s stand to gain the biggest benefit. Why you ask? continue reading »last_img

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CUNA/NASCUS cybersecurity event to feature live hack, Secret Service expert

first_imgCredit unions hoping to get a firsthand–but safe–look at how a hacker might attempt to breach their systems can get just that at an upcoming symposium hosted by CUNA and National Association of State Credit Union Supervisors (NASCUS).The second annual NASCUS/CUNA Cybersecurity Symposium will be held in Denver Aug. 24 and 25.“Credit unions operate in an ever-changing digital environment where new risks emerge every day,” said Tracy Blaske, CUNA’s director of compliance education. “The cybersecurity symposium is an unparalleled opportunity for credit unions to prepare themselves for the countless cyberthreats we face today.”The event is meant to offer insights to credit union professionals in information technology (IT), security and compliance, as well as board members and executives.Tom Schauer of TrustCC will give a live demonstration on just how a hacker can use a few simple, readily available online tools to launch an attack on a financial institution, an attack that can eventually yield sensitive data, passwords and complete network access. continue reading » 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Eboni Usoro-Brown: England international says motherhood and elite sport does not have to be an either-or choice | Netball News

first_imgEboni Usoro-Brown is returning to elite netball after becoming a mother for the first time
Eboni Usoro-Brown is returning to elite netball after becoming a mother for the first time

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Maurizio Sarri fires warning to Tottenham after Chelsea’s win against Fulham

first_img Metro Sport ReporterSunday 3 Mar 2019 5:32 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link961Shares Advertisement Comment Chelsea are five points off Spurs (Picture: Getty)‘As I said to you after Tottenham, we were trying to involve Tottenham in the fight,’ said Sarri.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘And I think that now they are involved. So, better two teams for four places than three for one place.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing ArsenalSarri reinstated Kepa into his starting XI at Craven Cottage after dropping him for the win against Spurs.Chelsea had the Spaniard to thank in the dying stages when he saved from Aleksandar Mitrovic but Sarri was pleased with his side’s performance.‘I think that we played very well for 60 minutes. Very well,” Sarri added.‘We could have killed the match with a third goal. We didn’t kill the match and then, in the last 25 minutes, we were really very tired’‘Physically but also mentally. In seven days, we played 120 minutes in a very difficult match against City. We played 90 minutes, very expensive, against Tottenham.‘And today we had to play a very important derby against a team with a new coach, so it was a really very difficult match. I think very well for 60 minutes, and then very tired. That’s the normal reaction to our seven days.’MORE: Jose Mourinho reveals the one problem Chelsea have with Gonzalo Higuain Maurizio Sarri fires warning to Tottenham after Chelsea’s win against Fulham Maurizio Sarri is backing his side to finish in the top four (Picture: Getty)Chelsea boss Maurizio Sarri has warned Tottenham they’re now in a battle for the top four after the Blues’ 2-1 win against Fulham.Goals from Jorginho and Gonzalo Higuain handed Chelsea their second London derby win in a week after their 2-0 win against rivals Spurs on Wednesday.With Tottenham and Arsenal drawing on Saturday, Chelsea’s win means that there’s just five points between them in sixth and Mauricio Pochettino’s men in third.Chelsea appear to have emerged from a difficult February and Sarri’s demonstrated their new-found confidence with a warning for Spurs.ADVERTISEMENT Advertisementlast_img read more

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