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If Ray Rice Told The Truth Roger Goodell the

Ravens general manager Ozzie Newsome.Ozzie Newsome, the highly respected general manager of the Baltimore Ravens, testified in the Ray Rice hearing that the former Ravens’ running back gave NFL commissioner Roger Goodell a blow-by-blow (pardon the pun) description of what happened in at elevator with his wife, Janay, long before the commish suspended Rice indefinitely from the league.If this is true, Goodell should be fired.Why? Because Goodell said Rice was “ambiguous” in his description of what happened on the elevator in the early morning hours of Valentine’s Day—and that Rice’s ambiguity led to him changing the two-game suspension to an indefinite suspension after seeing the video of the incident because he said he did not know the severity of what happened.Goodell said Rice did not tell him he punched his then-fiance in the face and knocked her out. However, Newsome testified that he was there and, according to ESPN, heard Rice give Goodell the gory details.This is not a Black man lying for another Black man. This is the commissioner of the NFL being called out on what appears to be a lie—another botched element of this sad case.Newsome’s testimony also shows that Goodell suspended Rice twice for the same offense: Once when Rice told him what happened and again after the video was released months later showing the infamous left-handed punch. This gives Rice leverage to be reinstated to the NFL, although he likely will be hard-pressed to find a team that would welcome him.A larger concern is the power that Goodell has flung about with impunity since taking over as commissioner—an overseer control freak who has used scare tactics to achieve his mission. Sound familiar in history?He has exacted punishment on players with impunity, garnishing a reputation as a power hungry ruler of all things NFL.The undercurrent is there is white rule over Black players. Goodell sits on high and determines what the athletes who drive America’s most profitable and popular sport are held held accountable for under his watch. Not a good look.Players have gotten to where they are scared to voice concern about Goodell’s power, for fear of retribution. Problem is, his authority was granted to him by the NFL Players Association, same as with previous commissioners.Goodell has chosen to use his power at times to insulting levels. The way he handled the New Orleans Saints bounty scandal, in particular, was outrageous. He issued fines for borderline hits, eliminated post-touchdown celebrations, viewed by many as another way to suppress Black celebration of achievement. Goodell ran things—runs things—as he sees fit, a dictator ruling his underlings.David Stern did the same when he ran the NBA for 30 years, and instituted a dress code for players—a move widely considered an act against Black players playing in front of mostly white crowds. And it was under Stern’s rule that the league airbushed a photo of tattoo-laden Allen Iverson on the cover of an NBA magazine.Rice’s case will challenge Goodell’s power. . . and future. If Newsome’s testimony proves to be accurate—and there is no reason to believe it is not—the commissioner will be proven to have lied. And his reign should be over. read more

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OutofPocket Costs for Military Housing to Rise Slightly in 2016

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR Service members will pay a little more of their housing costs in 2016 under the fiscal 2016 defense authorization bill, which calls for out-of-pocket costs to rise by one percentage point a year until they reach 5 percent in 2019.As a result, personnel will pay 2 percent of their rental and utility costs out-of-pocket next year. The basic allowance for housing (BAH) only covers 99 percent of housing costs this year due to a compromise reached in the FY 2015 authorization bill.Monthly out-of-pocket costs in 2016 will range from $24 to $57 depending on grade and dependency status, according to a DOD press release. Overall, BAH rates will increase an average of 3.4 percent, or $54 per month, starting Jan. 1. The Pentagon calculates BAH rates annually based on data — covering rents and utilities — collected from more than 300 U.S. housing locations.Rate increases are significant in many of the locations experiencing rate hikes. The largest gains are in Boston, 13.9 percent; Vallejo, Calif., 13.5 percent; Seattle, 13.3 percent; Long Island, N.Y., 13 percent; and Pittsburgh, 12.8 percent.Rates varied greatly across the nation. An officer with a one-star general rank or above living with children in San Francisco would receive the largest housing allowance in 2016, $5,949 a month. A one-star general or above serving at White Sands Missile Range in Las Cruces, N.M., would receive a BAH of only $1,470, reported Stars and Stripes.For enlisted members, an airman or private with children living in San Francisco would receive $4,004 a month; the equivalent airman or private assigned to Fort Chaffee, Ark., would receive only $774 a month.DOD will pay an estimated $21 billion in housing benefits to about 1 million service members in 2016.last_img read more

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Salt Water System Could Generate Hydrogen

first_img In the proposal, physicist Roberto De Luca from the University of Salerno in Italy has suggested that flowing salt water could generate an electromotive force, which in turn could generate an electric power output. In his theoretical analysis, he considers letting salt water (containing sodium and chlorine ions) run through a rectangular pipe that has two metal electrodes on the sides, under the influence of a perpendicular magnetic field. In this set-up, the Lorentz force acts on the sodium and chlorine ions in the salt water, creating a Faraday voltage across the two electrodes, and producing an electromotive force.”I started considering the question Dr. Pasquale Desideri, a Roman chemist, asked,” De Luca told PhysOrg.com. “If a transverse magnetic field is applied to salt water flowing in a thin rectangular pipe, would an electromotive force appear at the sides of the pipe itself? This question was interesting both from a didactical and a scientific point of view. Didactically, one could come up with an interdisciplinary lecture, making a comparison between the electrical transport properties of the ‘Fermi sea’ (the collection of free electrons in a metal) and the ‘ordinary sea’ (which a physicist could conceive as a collection of rather free Na+ and Cl- ionic charges diluted in water, besides a place to go in summertime).” De Luca discovered that an experiment conducted in 1972 (by Wright and Van Der Beken) had demonstrated that Desideri’s hypothesis was true: salt water flowing in a pipe under a transverse magnetic field does show an effect, similar to the Hall effect, in conducting metals. De Luca thought that this simple fact deserved more attention.As he showed in his analysis, in order to produce a steady current in this device, the positive and negative electrodes experience different reactions. At one electrode, water is reduced to its components, resulting in oxygen and hydrogen gas. At the other electrode, chlorine ions are oxidized, producing chlorine gas. De Luca investigated the minimum concentration of sodium chloride in the water required to maintain a steady current. He calculated that only a small concentration of the ions is needed to establish a potential difference between the electrodes, and normal salt water has a significantly higher concentration than required. (The average salinity of seawater is about 3.5%, and about 78% of these salts is sodium chloride.) The technique also requires that the salt water flow through rectangular pipes with a very small height (so that they are nearly one-dimensional). Although the technique wouldn’t work in most natural locations, De Luca suggests that some desalination plants – where salt water is forced to run through small ducts – may provide an adequate infrastructure for the system. If so, desalination plants might also function as alternative electric power sources. “When I was sure that an electromotive force and hydrogen gas could be obtained from letting salt water circulate in the presence of a transverse magnetic field, I thought about the huge desalination plants, where intake of salt water from the sea is needed. In general, these plants are run by oil, even though they are mostly located in places where solar power is present in abundance. Getting some power out of these plants simply by applying a transverse magnetic field to pipes could mean saving some power. Besides, getting hydrogen gas from sea water could gives us hope that in the future we would not easily run out of fuel.'”There are still some challenges that this scheme faces, but De Luca has showed the potential using this method to produce hydrogen gas in a natural and inexpensive way. Apart from applications, the concept could be used in introductory physics classes to teach students about the transport properties of ionic aqueous solutions and conducting materials. “I am now sure that most people will come up saying that these applications are rather difficult to implement and, even though some uses of this simple theoretical analysis can be envisioned, the amount of power one can derive from these systems is rather small,” he said. “Scientifically, however, one is mainly concerned with the clear statement of some well-defined facts. In particular, I can say that it can be nowadays stated that hydrogen gas can be cheaply produced by solar energy, as already noticed in a previous paper, and can also be produced by simple electrodynamic effects. How cheaply in the latter case? Consider that seas do not ever stand still and that, luckily enough, there exist so called permanent magnets.” More information: De Luca, R. “Lorentz force on sodium and chlorine ions in a salt water solution flow under a transverse magnetic field.” European Journal of Physics, 30 (2009) 459-466.© 2009 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Salt Water System Could Generate Hydrogen (2009, March 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-03-salt-hydrogen.html Scientists revisit 1833 hydrogen production experimentcenter_img (PhysOrg.com) — The idea of generating hydrogen from salt water has often been claimed to work effectively. However, the systems proposed so far generally require a much greater energy input than the energy they produce, making them impractical for energy generation. Now, a recently revived system may be able to cheaply generate a small amount of power. In this illustration of the system, salt water flows through a rectangular pipe under the influence of a perpendicular magnetic field, B0. The Lorentz force causes the charged sodium and chlorine ions to accumulate near the metal plates on the sides of the pipe, generating a constant electric field, E. Image credit: R. De Luca. Explore furtherlast_img read more

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Horses on the go

first_imgVisitors of United art Fair will witness some fine Aiyannar terracota art. The ancient art of making art pieces by moulding and baking unglzed clay, which is limited to a few artists in country will be on display. Magnificent figures of horses  that were worshiped as protective dieties in Tamil Nadu will be a part of the exhibition. These horses are upto six meters in height, accessorised with bells, mirrors, grotesque faces and crocodiles among other regional variations. The style of the horses vary from area to area; some are more realistic or more abstract but they are all complete with harness and reins. The form of these terracotta horses were found at Aiyanar shrines in Salem and Pudukottai districts was noted in 1909. The curator of this show Garima Jain is a young facilitator for art projects and promoter of contemporary Indian Art and Craft. The pieces are on display to promote and support dying art of terracota. The pieces will be on display at Pragati Maidan during the fair.last_img read more

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Vision Travel acquires Montreals Voyages Cortravco

first_img Posted by << Previous PostNext Post >> Share Vision Travel acquires Montreal’s Voyages Cortravco MONTREAL — Vision Travel has increased its foothold in the Quebec market with the acquisition of Montreal-based Voyages Cortravco.Voyages Cortravco was established in 1990 by Kit Sawhney and his sister Sarita Sawhney as an international corporate travel management agency, specializing in small to medium size clients with a reputation built on a high level of customer service.The company will operate as Cortravco, a Direct Travel Company, but under the Vision Travel umbrella.“We are excited to welcome the entire team from Voyages Cortravco into our family,” said Joel Ostrov, President of Vision Travel, Quebec East Region of Direct Travel. “This acquisition will solidify our leadership in the Montreal corporate and high-end leisure market, bringing even more talent to our organization here in the Quebec East Region of Direct Travel.”Cortravco’s Kit Sawhney and Vision Travel’s Joel OstrovKit Sawhney will continue on with the company as Senior Vice President, Vision Travel, Quebec East Region, reporting directly to Ostrov. Sarita will stay on as Senior Director, VIP Client Services.More news:  War of words between Transat, Group Mach ramps up“We knew this would be a great fit with Vision & Direct’s continued growth and global strategy,” said Sawhney. “Their personalized approach to travel is right in line with how we have done business for the past 28 years.”center_img Tuesday, July 10, 2018 Tags: Montreal, Quebec, Vision Travel Solutions, Voyages Cortravco Travelweek Group last_img read more

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