Tag: 阿拉爱上海

Rhizen Pharmaceuticals AG Announces That Its Partnered Asset, Umbralisib (UKONIQ™), Has Received US FDA…

first_img WhatsApp WhatsApp By Digital AIM Web Support – February 8, 2021 Facebook Facebook Rhizen Pharmaceuticals AG Announces That Its Partnered Asset, Umbralisib (UKONIQ™), Has Received US FDA Accelerated Approval for Adult Patients With Relapsed or Refractory MZL & FL Previous articleMcCormack helps unranked KU beat No. 23 Oklahoma St. 78-66Next articleCirelli scores twice as Tampa Bay beats Predators 4-1 Digital AIM Web Support BASEL, Switzerland–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Feb 8, 2021– Rhizen Pharmaceuticals, a clinical-stage oncology-focused biopharmaceutical company, today announced that its novel next generation PI3K-delta inhibitor, Umbralisib, which was licensed to TG Therapeutics (NASDAQ:TGTX), has secured US FDA accelerated approval for the treatment of: adult patients with relapsed or refractory marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) who have received at least one prior anti-CD20 based regimen, andadult patients with relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma (FL) who have received at least three prior lines of systemic therapy. Accelerated approval was granted for these indications, under a priority review (MZL), based on the results of the Phase 2 UNITY-NHL Trial (NCT02793583); in MZL, an ORR of 49% with 16% complete responses and in FL an ORR of 43% with 3% complete responses were achieved, respectively. Umbralisib was earlier granted Breakthrough Therapy Designation (BTD) for the treatment of MZL and orphan drug designation (ODD) for the treatment of MZL and FL. Umbralisib is a novel, next generation, oral, once daily, inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) delta and casein kinase 1 (CK1) epsilon and was discovered by Rhizen Pharma and subsequently licensed to TG Therapeutics (NASDAQ:TGTX) at an IND stage (TGR 1202) in 2012. In 2014, both parties entered into a licensing agreement as a part of which TGTX obtained worldwide rights and Rhizen has retained commercialization rights for India while also being the manufacturing and supply partner for Umbralisib. Swaroop Vakkalanka, President & CEO of Rhizen Pharmaceuticals said: “Umbralisib’s approval offers MZL & FL patients a new treatment option and is a huge validation of Rhizen’s drug discovery & development capabilities. This is a momentous occasion in Rhizen’s journey as a successful biotech that speaks of the true ability of our team to discover & develop safe and effective therapies that can last the rigors of drug development. Further, we are keen to bring Umbralisib to Indian patients and we plan to initiate activities towards registration and approval there soon.” Pranav Amin, Chairman, Rhizen Pharmaceuticals & Managing Director of Alembic Pharmaceuticals Ltd said: “We are extremely proud of this historic milestone for Rhizen, and of the fact that Umbralisib is the first NCE discovered by Indian scientists to secure a US FDA approval. We are committed to working together with TG Therapeutics and Rhizen Pharma to ensure uninterrupted supply of UKONIQ™. Umbralisib is the first discovery asset to come out of Rhizen’s R&D efforts and this approval heralds the promise of the rest of Rhizen’s deep pipeline and continuing efforts.” About Umbralisib: Umbralisib is the first and only oral inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) delta and casein kinase 1 (CK1) epsilon. PI3K-delta is known to play an important role in supporting cell proliferation and survival, cell differentiation, intercellular trafficking and immunity and is expressed in both normal and malignant B-cells. CK1-epsilon is a regulator of oncoprotein translation and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer cells, including lymphoid malignancies. Umbralisib is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) who have received at least one prior anti-CD20-based regimen and for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma (FL) who have received at least three prior lines of systemic therapy. These indications are approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in a confirmatory trial. More information on Umbralisib or UKONIQ™ can be found at https://www.tgtherapeutics.com/prescribing-information/uspi-ukon.pdf. About Alembic Pharmaceuticals Ltd: Alembic Pharmaceuticals Limited, a vertically integrated research and development pharmaceutical company, has been at the forefront of healthcare since 1907. Headquartered in India, Alembic is a publicly listed company that manufactures and markets generic pharmaceutical products all over the world. Alembic’s state of the art research and manufacturing facilities are approved by regulatory authorities of many developed countries including the USFDA. Alembic is one of the leaders in branded generics in India. Alembic’s products that are marketed through a marketing team of over 5000 are well recognized by doctors and patients. Information about Alembic can be found at http://www.alembicpharmaceuticals.com/. (Reuters: ALEM.NS) (Bloomberg: ALPM) (NSE: APLL TD) (BSE: 533573) About Rhizen Pharmaceuticals A.G.: Rhizen Pharmaceuticals is an innovative, clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery and development of novel onco-therapeutics. Since its establishment in 2008, Rhizen has created a diverse pipeline of proprietary drug candidates targeting several cancers and immune associated cellular pathways. Rhizen is headquartered in Basel, Switzerland. For additional information, please visit www.rhizen.com. View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210208005742/en/ CONTACT: Samyukta Bhagwati Manager, Corporate Affairs & Communications Rhizen Pharmaceuticals AG +41 32 580 0113 [email protected] KEYWORD: EUROPE SWITZERLAND UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA INDUSTRY KEYWORD: SCIENCE BIOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH PHARMACEUTICAL ONCOLOGY HEALTH FDA CLINICAL TRIALS SOURCE: Rhizen Pharmaceuticals AG Copyright Business Wire 2021. PUB: 02/08/2021 11:45 PM/DISC: 02/08/2021 11:45 PM http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210208005742/encenter_img Twitter Pinterest Twitter Pinterest TAGS  Local NewsBusinesslast_img read more

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Kitsch or artwork? Controversial monument unveiled in Serbia

first_imgBELGRADE, Serbia (AP) — Serbia’s president has attended the unveiling of a grandiose monument to a medieval monk and historic ruler which has come under fire from critics who call it oversized and kitschy.  President Aleksandar Vucic’s allies say the 23-meter-high, 70-ton bronze sculpture of the legendary founder of the Serbian state, Stefan Nemanja, placed on a gilded egg-shaped construction in downtown Belgrade will be a new landmark of the Serbian capital.  Opponents think the monument is a megalomaniacal and pricy token of Vucic’s populist and autocratic rule that should be removed. The unveiling was on Wednesday night.last_img read more

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Governor Jim Douglas on Aviatron

first_imgGovernor Jim Douglas on AviatronGovernor Jim Douglas congratulates a Vermont aviation firm, Aviatron of South Burlington, for landing a $6.2 million aircraft maintenance contract.last_img

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Sharks thrash Ulinzi to sail into Shield final

first_img0Shares0000Kariobangi Sharks’ Erick Kapaito against Ulinzi Stars GK Timothy Odhiambo. Photo/RAYMOND MAKHAYANAIROBI, Kenya, Sep 23 – For the second season in a row, Kariobangi Sharks reached the finals of the SportPesa Shield following their 4-1 victory over Ulinzi Stars in the first semi-final hosted at the Moi International Sports Center Kasarani on Sunday.Duke Abuya opened the scoring four minutes after kick-off before Shaphan Oyugi added the second while Erick Kapiato notched a brace. Ulinzi got a consolation from in stoppage time from Cliff Kasuti. Sharks will meet Sofapaka, the 2014 champions who bundled out defending champions AFC Leopards on a 1-0 score-line.Kariobangi Sharks players celebrating. Photo/RAYMOND MAKHAYASharks will be looking to go one better and clinch their first ever Shield title that will guarantee them a slot at next year’s CAF Confederation Cup.Former Mathare United winger Harrison Mwendwa was the chief orchestrator, handing the Ulinzi Stars midfielder a hard time as he provided the first assist, setting up Abuya with a low cross to tap in far post.Mwendwa was at it again, this time swinging a cross to find Oyugi who in-turn beat Ulinzi shot-stopper Timothy Odhiambo to double the lead.Ulinzi Stars players disappointed after being bundled out of Shield by Sharks. Photo/RAYMOND MAKHAYAThe soldiers found themselves trailing three goals down after deadly striker Kapaito capitalized on defensive blunder to punish Ulinzi in the 19th minute as Sharks comfortably led 3-0 at the interval.The second half was even better for Sharks who completely shut Ulinzi’s midfield with Kapaito Kapaito completing his brace through a well measured cross inside the box.Substitute Kasuti handed Ulinzi a consolation goal in the 90th minute after Elvis Nandwa’s shot hit the woodwork for Kasuti to connect the rebound.The loss crashed Ulinzi’s hopes of returning to the Shield final for the first time since 2016 when they lost to Tusker FC 1-0.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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Focused Fortuna Huskies rout Mack, 9-0

first_imgFortuna >> If the playoffs were to start tomorrow, the Fortuna Huskies are more than ready.Fortuna scored seven first half goals en route to a 9-0 blistering of the McKinleyville Panthers on Saturday at Fortuna High School.The Huskies (14-0 overall, 9-0 Big 5) got a hat trick from Julian Urbina and another two goals from Luis Atilano in a game that saw them jump out to a 3-0 lead after a mere 11 minutes had expired in the first half.“Our chemistry is there,” said Huskies midfielder Marin …last_img read more

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Letter: Apology from Toronto to Warriors for cheers at Durant’s fall

first_imgApology to Warriors, fansfor cheering Durant’s fallRe: “Curry, Thompson at their best with season on the line” (Page C3, June 11)I wish to convey my apologies to the Oakland and area Golden State Warriors and NBA fans over the “classless” act displayed by some of our fans when Kevin Durant went down, clutching at his right leg during Game 5 here in Toronto.Kevin Durant is without a doubt a superstar in the league and our fans were fortunate to get to watch him play even for a short period.Th …last_img read more

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Cradle of Humankind is our human heritage

first_imgDr Ron Clarke pores over the skull of Little Foot, embedded in rock in the Sterkfontein Caves. The two A. sebida skeletons found in the Cradle of Humankind, one a child, the other an adult. The reconstructed A. sebida skeleton of the child.(Images: Wits University)MEDIA CONTACTS • Maropeng and Sterkfontein Caves+27 14 577 9000.RELATED ARTICLES• SA unearths new human ancestor• Maropeng top evotourism destination• A hairy anthropological puzzle• World heritage in South AfricaLucille DavieNot only has the Cradle of Humankind provided rich heritage of humankind’s origins, but it recently gave the world a new hominin species, the two-million-year-old Australopithecus sebida.Declared a Unesco World Heritage site in 1999, the 47 000ha area, some 40km north-west of Johannesburg, is the richest hominin fossil site in the world – 40% of the world’s hominin fossils have been discovered here. Excavations continue at the site, where already 950 hominin fossils and over 9 000 stone tools have been found.It was here, at the Sterkfontein Caves in 1947, that scientist Robert Broom found a hominin fossil skull that he named Mrs Ples, dating from about 2.8- to 2.6 million years ago. In 1994, bones of another specimen, dating back about 3.3 million years, was discovered in a box at the caves, and called Little Foot. The almost complete skeleton of Little Foot was then discovered in the caves, which are being painstakingly excavated.The area is a typical bushveld scene – long grass, scattered shrubs and trees, rolling koppies – but its ordinariness belies its importance to the palaeontology world.A. sebidaThe A. sebida find was made in 2008 but revealed to the world in 2010 by professors Lee Berger and Paul Dirks. Berger is a palaeoanthropologist at the Evolutionary Studies Institute at Wits University, and Dirks is a geologist, based at the James Cooke University in Australia. Berger led the team of scientists from across the globe on the excavation.Fragments of two skeletons were found, one a child, the other an adult. Estimates are that the child skeleton is of a boy between 11 and 13 years old, and an adult female in her late 20s or early 30s. Many more fossils are believed to be hidden in the cave into which they are believed to have fallen. “There are more hominin fossils than I have discovered in my entire career,” said Berger, when the announcement was made in 2010.Sediba is Sotho for “well” or “spring”, and the discovery was so named because it is hoped that “a great source of information will spring from the fossils”. The particular site has been named Malapa.“The site where the fossils were discovered is technically the infill of a de-roofed cave that was about 30 to 50 metres underground just under two million years ago,” explained Berger. “The individuals appear to have fallen, along with other animals, into a deep cave, landing up on the floor for a few days or weeks. The bodies were then washed into an underground lake or pool probably pushed there by a large rainstorm. They did not travel far, maybe a few metres, where they were solidified into the rock, as if thrown into quick setting concrete. Over the past two million years the land has eroded to expose the fossil bearing sediments.”It is believed that A. sebida is a good candidate for being the transitional species between the southern African ape-man Australopithecus africanus (like the Taung Child and Mrs Ples) and either Homo habilis or even a direct ancestor of Homo erectus (like Turkana Boy, Java Man or Peking Man). The australopithecines are believed to be the ancestors of the Homo genus.There is no doubt, confirms Berger, that the new find is a new species, but not in the Homo genus. “There is broad acceptance of the species A. sediba among scientists as something previously unknown to science. Very little debate has occurred around whether these bones represent a new species. The debate has centred, largely, [on] whether the species should be placed in the genus Homo.”Long arms and powerful handsThe new species has long arms, like an ape, and short powerful hands, making it likely that it could have retained its ability to climb. A very advanced pelvis and long legs suggest that it was capable of striding and possibly running like a human. It is estimated that they were both about 1.27 metres tall, although the child would certainly have grown taller. The female probably weighed about 33 kilograms and the child about 27 kilograms at the time of its death.In September 2011, the almost complete hand skeleton of A. sediba, together with the brain, hip, foot and ankle, was unveiled to the public. The hand, which is very evolved, with a long thumb, like a human’s but long arms like an ape, indicate that A. sediba was bipedal but was also able to climb. The hand also suggests that A. sediba was capable of tool manufacture and use.A. sediba had a foot that was adapted to bipedal locomotion, without a grasping, divergent big toe needed for climbing. While it’s clear it was a terrestrial biped, it’s possible that it still regularly climbed trees to forage for fruits or other food items that could only be found there, as well as used trees to escape predators, or as a sleeping place safe from predators. The world A. sediba would have lived in would have been a mix of open savannah grassland and forest.The brain size of the juvenile was between 420 and 450 cubic centimetres, which is small when compared to the human brain of about 1 200 to 1 600 cubic centimetres, but its shape seems to be more advanced than that of australopithecines. But what makes the find special is that a complete clavicle or collar bone, a nearly complete scapula or shoulder blade, and a complete humerus or upper arm bone, and radius and ulna or forearm bones have been found.Team of scientistsBerger and Dirks assembled an international team of scientists, in all around a dozen people, although some 60 scientists from around the world have been involved in the unravelling of the discovery. The first step was to do a geological study, to help determine the age of the fossils. Other means of dating the fossils have been used: assessing the uranium lead components in the rock; establishing the magnetic signals in the rock, which change over time; and dating the rate of erosion of the site.An exciting aspect of the find is that more than bone has been preserved at the site. “The preservation at Malapa is excellent and there are certainly organic remains preserved like plant remains. There are some indications that even the soft tissues of animals are preserved, including possibly skin,” said Berger.Sterkfontein ValleyThe Sterkfontein Valley consists of about 40 different fossil sites, 13 of which have been excavated so far. It includes Bolt’s Farm, where the remains of three sabre-tooth cats were found in a pit that trapped animals; Swartkrans, where the earliest known deliberate use of fire was made, around 1.3 million years ago; Haasgat, where the fossils of early forest-dwelling monkeys, of about 1.3 million years old, were found; and Gondolin, where 90 000 fossil specimens have been found since 1979.As a World Heritage Site any finds belong to the world, although it is on privately owned land, and of course, the area is strictly controlled and protected.In the late 1890s, miners dynamited the Sterkfontein Caves, searching for limestone which they converted into quick lime, an element needed for the processing of gold and the manufacture of cement. They displaced the sediment and revealed entrances to the caves. The rocks contain cyclindrical shapes – evidence of early life called stromatolite, dating back 3.8 billion years. These organisms breathed in carbon dioxide and breathed out oxygen, thus increasing the Earth’s oxygen levels and leading to the evolution of other forms of life.Some 2.5 billion years ago, the area was a shallow lake. Over time it evaporated and formed dolomite, in which the stromatolite are visible. Around 2 billion years ago, a large meteorite, 10 kilometres in diameter, fell in Vredefort, 100 kilometres south of Sterkfontein, leaving a crater shape now known as the Vredefort Dome. The entire area was covered in debris, which helped preserve the gold reefs of the Witwatersrand, preventing them from being eroded. The debris also halted erosion in the broader area, hence the stromatolite rocks.Openings to the caves that are visible today started appearing about 3.5 million years ago, and may have been occupied by sabre-toothed cats and other predators, which would explain the remains of animals such as wildebeest, extinct zebra and buffalo, whose bones have been found in the caves. One of the caves, Plover’s Lake Cave, has been explored down 50 metres, but it has a labyrinth of unexplored passages and several entrances. Excavations of the cave and others is ongoing.The nearby Wonder Cave has an enormous chamber with beautiful 15m high stalactite formations. It is believed to be 2.2 million years old, and bones of rodents, frogs, lizards and birds have been found.MaropengMaropeng is the visitor and interpretation centre that complements the Sterkfontein Caves site in the cradle, some 10 kilometres north-west of the caves. Visitors are able to explore, by means of zones, the history of Earth and humankind. It is positioned up the side of a koppie, where ancient rocky outcrops mark the setting of a huge burial mound, referred to as a “tumulus”, a grassy mound 20m in height and 35m in diameter, in a teardrop shape.The site is visible from the road, with seven tall concrete pillars representing the seven daughters of Eve. Once in the tumulus, an exploration involving a boat ride on an underground lake examines the different forms of water. From there, the visitor takes a walk down an underground spine, learning through interactive displays about the discovery of fire, bipedalism, extinction, and DNA, among many other aspects of human evolution.Maropeng means “returning to the place of origin” in Setswana, the language spoken in the region. It is difficult, while walking around, to fully comprehend the age of the sites and the importance of the finds. Charles Darwin predicted in the 19th century that the origins of humankind would be traced back to Africa because of the existence of primates on the continent. The cradle is certainly the birthplace of humanity.last_img read more

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2017 Ohio State Fair Jr. Market Champions Reflection

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The 2017 Ohio State Fair has come and gone. The memories gained by the numerous young people involved in this year’s fair will last a lifetime. We congratulate all the youth that worked hard to make it to the fair. In this video, we take one final chance to recognize the junior market champions that appeared in the Sale of Champions this year.last_img

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When you’re thinking IoT expansion, think horizontal

first_imgIn the next interview in our series on the IoT ecosystem, we tackle what enterprise market participants need to consider when using IoT to help build out their business value beyond a single application — and for that, you need to think hard about your horizontal platform.We spoke with Nokia’s Jason Collins, vice president of IoT marketing, and Frank Ploumen, IoT new product introduction and strategy, to get their take on how you might be limiting your IoT value with short-term thinking of you’re not thinking horizontal.Readwrite: So, Jason, define how you see scalability for our enterprise clients that you guys may be talking to already; think in terms of product expansion or extension.Jason Collins: When most people think about scalability in the IoT space they would initially start thinking about the size of a deployment. In thinking about size they would take into consideration the problem they are trying to solve. For example, I want to measure temperature across a geographic landscape and I’m going to have X number of devices to do this. And that’s certainly one aspect of scalability, but more importantly, I think the first thing they should think about are the operational impacts of that kind of a deployment. If you’re going to deploy 20,000 devices and there is a security problem with those devices how do you update them, for example?See also: If data is the new oil, who is your refiner?And so scalability is also about operations. And then scalability is also across time. Nothing is ever static. Possible changes that may occur are: You may need to change a vendor out because they go out of business or a vendor becomes not suitable for something you want to do in the future. You may need new kinds of devices that support more features that you might be considering to improve your applications. So you need to support scalability across time, and across vendors, and you should think of scalability across efforts.This last point needs a little more explanation. If you’re a company that has multiple IoT activities that you’re going to deploy over time, how do you ensure that by the time you get to the second, third and fourth business objective that requires a new and different deployment, that you’re actually leveraging what you did in that first deployment? When you take this into consideration, scalability is a big deal to ensure that your future deployments are less cumbersome and more efficient.Frank Ploumen: I’ll have a few words. I want to particularly stress the point of multi-vendor interoperability. A lot of times when we talk to customers, the question that we get is, I can buy a solution from vendor XYZ that is turnkey and does everything from the application to the device, why would I want the hassle of this whole platform? And the discussion we usually get into is, ‘The last time I deployed a major platform or network, once it was finally deployed some things had changed causing higher hardware; higher integration costs; device OEM changes or all of the above.So the cost of ownership over the whole lifetime heavily depends on the ability to mix and match hardware devices for many vendors to a single application, and we’ve become very used to this in other industries. If I’m talking about Wi-Fi for example, the fact that Wi-Fi on one side of the device needs to talk to a specific router on the other side doesn’t matter. Wi-Fi is Wi-Fi. Ethernet is Ethernet. Windows is Windows. So we’ve become very used to mix and matching anything. We all want the same mix and match capability in IoT solutions which require a horizontal platform capability. However, in the IoT space, we’re still stuck in very proprietary solutions where only certain permutations and combinations work.RW: If that’s the case and obviously interoperability is the biggest challenge.  I mean I literally spent two hours yesterday, just talking to three different folks at this conference yesterday who were doing different mesh network related hardware deployments for a certain basket of industries. And we should talk about that, I can feel them pulling back and saying I can’t sort out everything about interoperability, I’m trying to cover this space, for me to be able to explain it to my client. So in your minds what does the ideal platform look like, given that…?JC: That’s exactly why you have a layered model. As an example, look at something as simple and well-known as the OSI network model. The fact is that there are already standards around the Internet but the way it starts is that you actually have a lot of different connectivity technologies and different layers that hide the complexity and hide the lack of standards from the layer beneath.So part of this is, yes we need to have standards out of the bottom end of this platform, but another consideration is, the platform needs to be able to adapt to the standards and proprietary protocols that are there, and also account for the standards that are coming up.FP: Let’s review some of the key layers that come with an IoT solution.At the bottom layer, you have devices or sensors, and they are the source of the data. Then you have networks, and network is a very broad term for local networks, long distance networks, wired, wireless, licensed or unlicensed and so on, or a combination of any of the above, but ultimately networks.Then you have a layer where networks feed into a data mediation or brokerage layer.Then at the top level, we have the stuff that we all know very well and that’s the applications, the dashboards, the very visible stuff.A very important design goal when we talk about scalability and horizontal platforms is that we basically figured an application should be completely agnostic on what happens underneath. Data is data. Temperature is temperature. You, as an application developer should not have to worry where temperature came from, what protocol is used, what device generated it. Your application cares about temperature, that’s all you need to know. Creating this level of segmentation will make interoperability easier.JC: And by the way to that point, if you look at something like IoT versus a generic Internet application, the IoT application is different… because of things like battery life and the size and kinds of data that you’re getting from the devices. Actually, what most people in this industry are used to dealing with which is IP because it’s been around forever…but IP doesn’t actually become a good way of accessing devices as you go lower in the stack.  So there’s a reinvigoration of the need to have an adaption layer because everybody is going to be analyzing and transporting this data using the IP layer and above once it hits the core network. Meanwhile, below that, when you get to the devices IP makes no sense because you’re running out of battery in a week.FP: That’s a very interesting observation. The implication here is that the number of use cases in IoT is so vast, that it’s unrealistic to expect that there’s a one size fits all network typology type of solution. There will be many answers to many different things.What I do on a battery constrained device that runs in the field (e.g. in oil and mining) versus a powered device used in the connected home is different from the physical layer point of view. But the application should not have to be tailored because otherwise, you keep redesigning and re-architecting applications for hybrid environments.RW: You’re turning a hardware problem into a software problemFP: Exactly. So if I build very simply let’s say an asset tracking application. In one city, I might be tracking over a cellular network. Why would I have to redesign that if I am deploying the same application in mining on a custom proprietary network. It’s the same application. Or maybe I have hybrids. I have networks that have some devices coming in over one network and then devices coming in over a new network. Like when we roll out 5G we will start rolling out devices. You don’t want to have to deal with applications that work in the old world and then different applications that work in the new world.RW: A lot of what you just pointed out there is a story that I see over and over again. Some company has to do IoT strategy, so come let me explain it to you. And when I sit down with them and it’s a brand that you wouldn’t think of as being IoT right out of the box, it’s not one of the sort of pillars of IoT around communication or some aspect of big data or a specific hardware industrial, smart home marker, whoever, who you can see why they’d want to provide better connections or to create a network out of their core product.You can see that they want to dig out the corner of the world that they can understand. if you were to say how do you build a horizontal platform, do they need to be told that, do they need to just be made aware that they already have one, how do you picture that conversation going? Obviously, it’s client specific, but do they really know what they have already?You can see that they want to dig out the corner of the world that they can understand. if you were to say how do you build a horizontal platform, do they need to be told that, do they need to just be made aware that they already have one, how do you picture that conversation going? Obviously, it’s client specific, but do they really know what they have already?What do you need as an enterprise client to build a horizontal platform? Do you just need to be made aware that you already have the beginnings of this and how to jump off from there?JC: I would say the first thing is becoming convinced that you actually need a platform.  So you see a lot of people going out and building siloed applications which I think is fine as long as all you’re doing is an experiment. It’s when you actually stop and think about how this will answer a real business problem and positively impact your business longer term, is when you should think about a need for a platform that can exist for the next 10 years or more and expand to meet my needs. When you start thinking about scalability issues you quickly come to the conclusion that you shouldn’t be just haphazardly bringing up siloed applications. It is the equivalent of a simplified analogy that goes like this: “I need these two computers to communicate with each other, so therefore I’m going to a string a wire down the wall and then down the hallway.”In the short term that could be fine, until you realize what you wanted to do is to provide everybody in the office with PCs on their desktops and be able to do email. Suddenly you think, ‘Well, maybe stringing a wire isn’t the best idea. Maybe the first idea is to hook up the first two executives to see if they use e-mail as an application, but not such a good idea for actually deploying email for an enterprise.So convincing somebody that they need a platform is first, and then I would say that you probably don’t want to build your own platform because there’s a lot of platforms out there. I should be looking for what I can hook into that already exists that could give me a leg up. And I should start that conversation by thinking about the things we’ve been talking about.  Standards, support for existing proprietary stuff, data mediation: what’s going to make it easier for me to build applications on top of that? What’s going to make it easy for me to hook up my particular devices now and as we move forward into an unknown future?It’s something that we haven’t talked about because I think we’ve been focused kind of on the data mediation piece of the whole problem, but device management is also really, really key to think about–and doing it in standards-based way so that as I increase the size and numbers and kinds of deployments, that I have a way of accessing these devices and doing updates and monitoring battery life in a way that is hidden from the application layer.It’s something that we haven’t talked about because I think we’ve been focused kind of on the data mediation piece of the whole problem, but device management is also really, really key to think about–and doing it in standards-based way so that as I increase the size and numbers and kinds of deployments, that I have a way of accessing these devices and doing updates and monitoring battery life in a way that is hidden from the application layer.FP: The examples that Jason gives are all examples that have to do with operations and the cost over the lifecycle of the service. First enterprises need to understand if they want to pursue IoT or not. Most people have already made that mental decision. And then they jump straight to the use case, like how awesome would it be if I can control or automate or analyze etc. and the operations often become an afterthought. Which is why the platform discussion doesn’t get a front row seat. We’re going to get started, we can control a few things, we hook up a few things, it looks really awesome. Like Jason’s analogy when we strung the two computers together we could get email and I’ll just roll it out to everybody.If you don’t think about that operations problem up front, then you’re really going to get burnt down the road. And here’s where you see two different types of customers. The customers that either have been burnt before and start very carefully to delve into those operational questions. They’re very easily convinced they need a platform. And others are maybe a bit naive in operations and just focus on the use case per se and consider operations something that will come down the road. And that’s a very difficult conversation to have.The second observation here is whether to build it ourselves or whether to buy it, and this is also not a new discussion. If you remember several years ago when a lot of embedded devices had their own custom operating systems and there was a lot of fragmentation in that area. The mindset of the developers often was ‘well I want to avoid paying for licenses, how hard could it be, I download some open source software to build my own version of what I need. We’ve all been there but at some point, you realize it can’t be just downloading an open distribution from Linux. The real value is in not having to maintain the lower layer itself. If it is done well by someone else you are more interoperable with the rest of the world which adds significant value.RW: So that operations gap, I guess it’s been explained to me, I look at some of the Industrial concepts and I see people struggling that we are at a certain level of transparency and data awareness and usefulness. And we want to 2X that, so it’s like the same song but twice as fast. So they can string two computers together and that is functional but it is not ideal. And that pushback between the operations and the data management executive side of the discussion is a chasm that’s challenging them to bridge. Are these silos still too hard to knock down within an organization? Is it going to be a real challenge to have that internal discussion?FP: Well you realize that the history in IoT is quite long. People might have deployed proprietary systems that are basically connected and seem to be very functional. The longer a system is in place without problems, the more afraid people get about dealing with it. When you’ve got let’s say an ancient building automation system from twelve years ago, that talks protocols that no one understands, but it works fantastic even though it should have been retired a long time ago.RW: So we don’t want to open it up because we don’t know what will happen.FP: The problem that comes is if you ever want to do anything more than what is designed for or for example connect new hardware to this platform, well good luck right? It’s a closed island and it is what it is. Now you’re stuck.I’ve seen customers literally come to us, and one particular example a couple of years ago, a customer, I kid you not, told me that they had 37 different building automation systems that were gathering energy data from their real estate. And they could not come up with a way to aggregate and consolidate all of the data so that they could compare energy bills.So you get into situations where nobody wants to touch it because it works. That’s one of the sad things about this old industrial stuff. It is really good at what it does, but you’ve lost all flexibility, and the opportunity to improve it and make it interact with other things in the world. As opposed to looking at the internet with anything connected to anything and which continues growing and picking up new data sources. I’m making a very extreme case here right. But look at something like Alexa in Amazon that we all know. Alexa connects to everything and anything and can control anything. It adds a few hundred different interfaces per month so it becomes richer and more powerful.With Alexa, you’re tearing off a sheet and starting something new with being the leading voice commands platform,What they’ve done is created a really good framework for integrating islands of data. Because otherwise, it wouldn’t be very good if Alexa could just do one thing, it would be a one trick pony.The reason it’s so good is they’ve made it really easy to integrate Alexa against Philips lights, against thermostats, against you name it, so that’s the platform analogy power that you see there. If they hadn’t done that and they made it very narrowly defined, then it wouldn’t have had that power. The platform gives you that ability to very quickly and seamlessly integrate islands of data including those old legacy items that nobody wants to deal with.Published in partnership with Nokia. Internet of Things Makes it Easier to Steal You… ReadWrite Sponsors Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Follow the Puckcenter_img Related Posts Tags:#featured#hardware#Internet of Things#IoT#MWCA17#Nokia#sensors#top Small Business Cybersecurity Threats and How to…last_img read more

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Gov’t Hails $350 Million Investment by Jamaica Broilers

first_imgMinister of Agriculture and Fisheries, Hon. Roger Clarke, has welcomed the $350 million investment by the Jamaica Broilers Group into its new Best Dressed Further Processing Facility at Spring Village, St. Catherine.The Minister, who toured the facility Wednesday, May 8, accompanied by Industry, Investment and Commerce Minister, Hon. Anthony Hylton and Members of Parliament, Dr. Andrew Wheatley and Everard Warmington, said he was extremely impressed by what he saw and commended the company for its continued commitment to Jamaica through its various investments.“I must commend you for other things too, because your foray into corn production tells me that this is a company that is continuously on the move. It is saying that regardless of what happens, you have a vested interest in the growth and development of Jamaica and for that I am proud and happy,” Mr. Clarke said.The Minister said he was particularly excited about the possibilities for export being explored by the company’s management.The facility, which was relocated from Content, Bog Walk, directly employs some 50 workers. The plant is internationally certified to International Standardization Organization (ISO) 14001 and 9001 standards and, on a weekly basis, processes meat, poultry, fish and other seafood for franchises such as KFC, Tastee Limited, Mother’s and Burger King, as well as for schools and restaurants.Senior Vice President of Poultry Operations at Jamaica Broilers Group, Ian Persard, said the investment reaffirms the Best Dressed group’s commitment to producing wholesome quality products to its customers. Mr. Persard noted that the move to the new location has given the company the ability to be more cost effective. “We have been able to pass on some of those (savings) to our customers, and I can tell you that they are very grateful for it,” he said.“In addition, we are poised not only to produce a number of further processed items, which are currently being imported into Jamaica … but it also sets us up to leverage in the export market and that is a critical feature of this project,” Mr. Persard said.He informed that the company is working with one of its large customers to get into the Caribbean market.The facility also provides products for consumers in the wholesale and retail trades. These include chicken and beef burgers, frankfurters and rotisserie chicken marketed primarily under the ‘Reggae Jammin’ brand.Contact: Andrea Brahamlast_img read more

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