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Limerick meeting to force action on housing crisis

first_imgNewsLocal NewsLimerick meeting to force action on housing crisisBy Alan Jacques – October 29, 2015 1168 Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Linkedin Twitter Email WhatsApp Facebook Advertisementcenter_img Previous articleSpooktacular CompetitionNext articleOpinions divided over abortion pill bus Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live by Alan [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up RENTS in Limerick are going through the roof. The housing waiting list is getting longer. And less social houses are being built, it has been claimed.A meeting will take place in Pery’s Hotel this Thursday, October 29, at 8pm to address the housing crisis and these specific issues.A teenage boy whose family was recently homeless while he was doing his Leaving Cert will speak openly about his own experiences. Jackie Bonfield of Mid West Simon Community and the Anti Austerity Alliance’s general election candidate for Limerick City, Cllr Cian Prendiville, will also speak at this free event.Cllr Prendiville feels those suffering the most from the housing crisis are being ignored. However, he believes, the water charges movement is proof that by standing together, the Government can be forced to take notice.“Rents in Limerick are going through the roof, as the housing waiting list gets longer and longer. Despite a lot of hot air, the Government still refuses to take real action on housing. They have built less social houses than any government for 45 years,” said Cllr Prendiville.“The Government has allowed the market to hold back the supply of homes and push up the prices. While over 5,000 families are on the housing list in Limerick, so far this year only 10 social houses have been built,” he added.This, the City North representative maintains, has given landlords a golden opportunity to drive up rents, while the Government refuse to implement rent controls.“With one quarter of the TDs in the Dail landlords themselves, is it any wonder?” he asked.According to Cllr Prendiville, Thursday night’s meeting is hoped to be the launch of a campaign to demand immediate action on the housing and rent crisis.“The AAA have helped coordinate protests and occupations of vacant and NAMA properties, to demand real action. We want to build a similar campaign here in Limerick to demand rent controls, and the right to a home for all,” he concluded. Print WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival TAGSAnti Austerity AllianceCllr Cian PrendivilleHousinglimerickMid West Simon CommunityNAMAPery’s Hotel RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

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‘It has even changed death’: Virus disrupts burials in Turkey

first_imgIn normal times, almost 200 people would have attended the funeral for Ahmet Ucukcu’s 95-year-old father at an Istanbul cemetery. The coronavirus which took his life has changed all that.”Many of my relatives wouldn’t come except for close family members and his sons who were authorized to attend only,” Ucukcu told AFP.  Topics : “We are just six or seven people.”The scaled-down ceremony took place at a cemetery in the city’s Beykoz district on the Asian side, which was built in March when Turkey confirmed its first virus case.It already houses the remains of over 700 people who died of contagious diseases including COVID-19.Ucukcu lost his father Ali to the virus after the old man was treated for 10 days. He also suffered from chronic illnesses. ‘Speedy burial’Ayhan Koc, head of  Istanbul’s cemeteries department, said a fast burial without traditional Islamic rituals was an efficient and correct method given the current situation.He said in the past there would have been a funeral prayer after the midday and afternoon prayers but now the aim was to ensure a speedy burial, without even taking the body to the mosque.The government shut down mosques in March for mass prayers as part of efforts to stop the spread of the virus.And rituals are no longer allowed where people visit the family of the deceased to offer their condolences and where verses from the Koran are recited.”A virus which could only be seen through a microscope has changed the world order, everything; customs, traditions and funeral ceremonies. It has changed even death,” said Koc.Turkey has recorded more than 4,200 coronavirus deaths and 153,000 confirmed cases but the daily death tolls have recently fallen below 100.center_img Gathered around the grave, Ucukcu and his close family — all wearing protective masks and standing a few paces from each other — say prayers after the coffin is buried.Before the pandemic a shroud would suffice.Only an hour earlier, the group were at a nearby morgue where the body was washed by personnel in hazmat suits before being wrapped in cloth and placed in a coffin.A small collective prayer was then held outside the morgue with those attending respecting social distancing rules. The imam — also in a hazmat suit — led the funeral prayers for the deceased before the coffin was taken by hearse to the Beykoz cemetery. ‘Damn disease’At the Beykoz cemetery, three women — a mother and her two daughters — wearing headscarves were sitting on the ground next to a headstone, reading the Koran, with tears in their eyes.  “Mosques are closed because of the pandemic. We cannot bury our deceased in the way we wanted,” said Filiz, who lost her 76-year-old father last week.He died from an infectious disease but was buried at Beykoz because he received treatment at a pandemic hospital although he tested negative for COVID-19.”Only six people could join the funeral prayer: his grandchildren, daughters and son-in-laws. We buried my dad altogether,” she said, adding the ceremony was at least “conducted in a proper fashion”.Relatives of the diseased respect the new rules “with no objections”, said Koc.Ahmet welcomed the new restrictive measures to protect people’s health.”If there was a crowd, it would be more dangerous,” he said.Cengiz Aktas was the only one to join the funeral prayer for his grandmother Faize Kilic, who died from coronavirus at the age of 85. “I have nobody who could join the rites here but me. My mother aged over 65 is not allowed to go out,” he said.”This is such a damn disease that you cannot have a proper funeral prayer at a mosque,” he lamented.last_img read more

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I won’t intentionally help my patients to end their lives

first_imgThe Age 9 October 2017Family First Comment: A great article – from a medical professional (not an ACT MP!) who knows the truth “A request to die is uncommon, and is often driven by poorly controlled pain or nausea, as well as fear, loss of function and hopelessness. Usually when pain and other symptoms are under control, good nursing care is on hand, and psychological support has been provided, patients no longer want their death to be hastened. For family members watching a loved one die, the experience can be agonising. However, with appropriate involvement of palliative care, the preparation and education of family members about the normal processes of dying (such as irregular breathing and fluctuating consciousness), and with the administration of pain relief, there is minimal physical suffering.Most patients with incurable cancer battle to the end. They exhaust all evidence-based active treatment options and clinical trials before being told that supportive care measures are now best.A request to die is uncommon, and is often driven by poorly controlled pain or nausea, as well as fear, loss of function and hopelessness. Usually when pain and other symptoms are under control, good nursing care is on hand, and psychological support has been provided, patients no longer want their death to be hastened.For family members watching a loved one die, the experience can be agonising. However, with appropriate involvement of palliative care, the preparation and education of family members about the normal processes of dying (such as irregular breathing and fluctuating consciousness), and with the administration of pain relief, there is minimal physical suffering.When a patient seeks assisted dying, it is often when they are first told they have a limited life expectancy and before they are truly unwell. They are so distressed by such difficult news that they anticipate what is to come and can be consumed with fear and an urge to regain control. They may respond by seeking assisted dying at a time of their choosing. In overseas jurisdictions where this is legal around 80 per cent of those who access it have cancer.Under the assisted suicide model proposed for Victoria, no psychiatric assessment or specialist palliative care assessment of intending patients are required. There is no need to involve the patient’s treating doctors as two new doctors with no mandated end-of-life expertise assess and authorise lethal medicine without any follow-up care.Informing family members is optional. The entire process can be completed and drugs taken within 10 days – little time for change of mind about an irreversible act. Everyone is presumed to have decision-making capacity unless they obviously don’t. Determination of a patient’s life expectancy involves an educated guess by doctors and the confidence intervals can be wide.READ MORE: http://www.theage.com.au/comment/i-wont-intentionally-help-my-patients-to-end-their-lives-20171009-gywz7j.html?platform=hootsuitelast_img read more

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Cameroun, Ghana Play to Stalemate

first_imgApart from that, the two sides served up a feast of misplaced passes, poor first touches and wayward finishing on another searing evening at the Ismailia stadium, while there were some unusual decisions from the referee.Ghana defender Jonathan Mensah was one of the few players to distinguish himself, making three key interventions to prevent a Cameroon goal.Five-time champions Cameroun stay top of Group F with four points while Ghana have a paltry two after their second successive draw.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Defending champions Cameroun and fellow favourites Ghana saturday played the second 0-0 draw in a row after eight days of at least a goal a game at AFCON 2019 in Egypt.Cameroon and Ghana, two of the most successful teams in Africa Cup of Nations history, cancelled each other out in their Group F match.Ghana nearly snatched the points in the 88th minute when Kwabena Owusu intercepted a wayward pass, charged forward and fired a ferocious shot against the bar.last_img read more

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