Tag: 深圳环保体验报告

USS The Sullivans Sails for Exercise Joint Warrior

first_img September 23, 2015 Back to overview,Home naval-today USS The Sullivans Sails for Exercise Joint Warrior View post tag: Joint Warrior Authorities USS The Sullivans Sails for Exercise Joint Warrior View post tag: europecenter_img View post tag: Exercise View post tag: USS The Sullivans Share this article The guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) departed Naval Station Norfolk Sept. 21 to participate in Exercise Joint Warrior off the coast of Scotland.Besides The Sullivans, other U.S. Navy units participating in the exercise include the guided-missile destroyer USS Ross (DDG 71), the fleet replenishment oiler USNS William McLean (T-AKE 12), and U.S. maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft from Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11.Also participating are maritime, land and air units from nine countries including Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Spain and the United Kingdom.Exercise Joint Warrior, course-designed and led by the Joint Tactical Exercise Planning Staff (JTEPS) in the United Kingdom, is intended to improve interoperability between allied and partner navies and prepares participants for a role in a joint maritime environment during deployments.As one of the largest concentrations of allied and partner forces in one integrated training event, Joint Warrior addresses the full spectrum of maritime and joint warfare mission areas.The Sullivans is named in honor of the five Sullivan brothers, who were killed when the ship they were assigned to, USS Juneau (CL-52), was sunk on November 13, 1942 and is homeported in Mayport, Florida.Image: US Navylast_img read more

Read More

Speech: Building public trust for the use of patient data

first_img the Health Secretary’s tech vision has laid out a road map for interoperability and better digital standards we are investing in the digital infrastructure at different levels in the NHS from Local Health and Care Record Exemplars (LCHREs) to digital pathology and radiology I am delighted to be here. As many of you will know, this is an agenda which has personal significance for me.Although it may feel to us that data ethics and health data sharing are 21st century challenges, it is hardly a new concept that human progress is built on our ability to gather accurate information, share it ethically and, finally, critically analyse it so we can transform raw data into actionable knowledge.Since before the establishment of the NHS in 1948 we have sought more and better ways to record, share and structure health data for patient benefit.Indeed, many of the scientific, ethical and regulatory challenges we are debating today in relation to patient data have their heritage in the evolution of clinical trials in which UK researchers have always been world leaders.From James Lind’s famous 1747 scurvy trial, which already contained most elements of a controlled trial.To the Medical Research Council’s (MRC) first double blind trial of patulin (for common cold) in 1943.To its first randomised control trial of streptomycin in 1946 – which was a landmark trial for its systematic enrolment criteria and data collection compared with the ad hoc nature of other contemporary research.We should be proud to have led the way in so much groundbreaking medical discovery.But we must do more than celebrate our successes. We must recognise these highly meticulous and ethical standards that have become deeply ingrained in our medical research and clinical systems is an exceptional national asset.And they are principles which stand us in good stead to realise the huge potential of patient data to improve health, care and services across the NHS.Long Term PlanAnd that is exactly what the Long Term Plan recognises. Developed with frontline staff, patients and their families, it calls for targeted investment in health data infrastructure and analysis to help deliver better prevention, earlier diagnosis and more targeted treatment.But it’s easy to forget that a key benefit of using health data more effectively though is safer, more responsive services to enable clinicians to spend less time administrating and more time treating patients. What they were actually trained to do, in other words.This is why: And why we are building on the great success of the 100,000 Genomes Project – which crucially translates into clinical care with the Genomic Medicine Service – with a National Genomic Strategy to draw together our world-leading strengths from the UK biobank to the commitment to sequence 5 million genomes in 5 years.Even with all this activity though, we all know we are just at the beginning of this journey and that is why we are so determined to start on firm foundations.One thing we have learnt through long, hard experience since that first 1747 trial though, that we have heard clearly today, is that the precondition for all medical innovation and clinical care is patient trust.National Data GuardianThat is why I am so pleased to be here today to mark the role of the National Data Guardian being placed on a statutory footing.This is an enormous achievement. It was a longstanding government commitment, but there were some challenges along the way to getting here and we would not be here without all of you – so I want to thank every one of you who played a role in getting us passed the finish line.Placing the National Data Guardian on a statutory footing strengthens the role as an independent and authoritative voice for the patient on how their data is used across the health and care system. It is right that patients are confident they have a strong champion, not only to advise them, but also to challenge the system and ensure that confidential information is safeguarded and used appropriately.In establishing this role, Dame Fiona has firmly rooted the National Data Guardian within the health and care system as an essential building block for building public trust for the use of patient data.Public trustAs Dame Fiona says, the 10 principles have been a key step in moving us forward in public and clinician trust for health data sharing.We remain absolutely committed to ensuring that the public have trust in how their data is used, that it is used effectively to support better health and care outcomes, and they understand there are robust safeguards in place to ensure it is used for purposes which they recognise as appropriate.Patients should have a clear explanation of how their data may be used for purposes beyond their individual care and of the security and legislative controls that are in place to protect their data.People want to know their privacy and rights are safeguarded and to understand how and when data about them is shared, as well as how and when they can make an informed choice about whether to share their data.We must continue the conversation we have started with the public, to build and maintain trust and confidence, recognising that there is no ‘one’ public and also that people’s views on patient data will naturally evolve depending on their personal experience and of course the advances in technology.That is exactly why the role and independence of the National Data Guardian is so vital.CybersecurityBut of course, our ability to unlock the benefits of using data relies not only on the public having confidence in the health and care system’s appropriate and effective use of data but also in their confidence that their data is held securely.Cyber threats to patient data are constantly evolving and always present. Health and care organisations must remain prepared and ready to respond.This isn’t just about protecting patients’ confidentiality by making sure that their data is secure, though of course that’s essential. It’s also about making sure the systems on which patients’ data is held can’t be disrupted or corrupted, because we want the right data to be available at the right time.For this reason we’ve worked with our arm’s length bodies to provide a range of specialist services that help organisations manage cyber risk and, if the worst happens, respond quickly in the event of an incident.Since the 2017 WannaCry attack we’ve invested over £60 million to make significant improvements in the cyber resilience of local infrastructure and we have a stronger regulatory framework to impose harsh penalties on organisations that allow data breaches to occur.We can never be complacent when it comes to ensuring the cyber security of our hospitals, ambulance services, or any of the many organisations that handle patient care and data, and there is still work to do.But this work to toughen up the cyber protection of the NHS is an essential enabler of better care, to ensure that data can be available where it’s needed, and that the public can trust that their data is secure.Role of NHS staffBut as Dame Fiona so clearly laid out, we all know this isn’t only about trust. The role of NHS staff is critical.Unsurprisingly, we’ve found that the public are most likely to listen to information about the benefits of, and their choices around the use of their data if it comes from frontline NHS staff.Medical researchers and secondary care clinicians are obviously on board with health data sharing, but the wider picture is more mixed. The Your Data Matters work highlighted that certain groups of NHS staff were less positive than the public about the benefits of data sharing. Others are unclear on how the rules apply to them. It goes without saying that if we are to realise the full potential of health data sharing – for patients, for our health system, indeed for those very NHS clinicians – this must change.Patients like me with complex illnesses and co-morbidities are crying out for a health system that shares our data better so we don’t have to explain our medical history at every appointment.Patients like me with rare diseases, who have battled through a decades-long diagnostic odyssey, are desperate for advances in data science to be applied to our anonymised health data so that others don’t have to suffer as we did and can be diagnosed and treated earlier.Patients like me want to have more control over our health data so we can manage our own long-term conditions more effectively and reduce unplanned GP and A&E visits, not to mention improve our quality of life.We are looking to the whole health and care system – including clinicians – to help us do this.Of course there are challenges. But that is the case with every medical innovation in history. The ‘challenges’ didn’t stop Lind’s scurvy trial or the MRC’s streptomycin trial or the 100,000 Genomes Project.All those achievements involved overcoming great odds and discovering new clinical standards, new protocols and effectively disseminating them – setting up new ways of working right across the whole health and care system.No health system in the world is better at this than us. We are more than equipped to respond to the challenges that health data sharing creates.And I know that because of all of you and the work you have already done.ConclusionToday I have referred to a few examples of clinical trial success, but the Understanding Patient Data website is awash with case studies of outstanding practice from across the country. Clinicians, industry, researchers, charities and government working together – all in accordance with the rules set out by the National Data Guardian – to improve patient care, patient safety and NHS services.To all of you Health Data Leaders here today – I want to offer my personal thanks. I look forward to working with all of you.I look forward to working with the National Data Guardian. Not only to ensure we keep building trust. But also that data saves more lives.last_img read more

Read More

Cameroun, Ghana Play to Stalemate

first_imgApart from that, the two sides served up a feast of misplaced passes, poor first touches and wayward finishing on another searing evening at the Ismailia stadium, while there were some unusual decisions from the referee.Ghana defender Jonathan Mensah was one of the few players to distinguish himself, making three key interventions to prevent a Cameroon goal.Five-time champions Cameroun stay top of Group F with four points while Ghana have a paltry two after their second successive draw.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Defending champions Cameroun and fellow favourites Ghana saturday played the second 0-0 draw in a row after eight days of at least a goal a game at AFCON 2019 in Egypt.Cameroon and Ghana, two of the most successful teams in Africa Cup of Nations history, cancelled each other out in their Group F match.Ghana nearly snatched the points in the 88th minute when Kwabena Owusu intercepted a wayward pass, charged forward and fired a ferocious shot against the bar.last_img read more

Read More

McKnight runs into NCAA allegations

first_imgJunior running back Joe McKnight came under fire over the winter break, as accusations of an illegal gift from a businessman, which would be an NCAA violation, became wide-spread.Escaping pressure · While NCAA allegations swirled during winter recess, McKnight took the opportunity to declare his intent to enter the 2010 NFL Draft, forgoing his senior year of eligibility. – Daily Trojan | Brandon HuiThe Los Angeles Times ran an article just before Christmas that looked at McKnight’s use of a 2006 Land Rover that he had been seen driving. The vehicle allegedly belongs to a Santa Monica businessman, Scott Schenter, who works for the County Assessor’s office. Schenter also founded a company called USC Marketing in 2008, which he says stands for United States China Marketing and is not connected to the university.Any use of this vehicle by McKnight as a benefit from a marketing representative, agents or anyone of that nature would be a violation of NCAA rules. Accordingly, the NCAA responded to the accusations by investigating the situation.McKnight was even forced to sit out of the Trojan’s San Francisco Emerald Bowl game after he was deemed unable to play by USC’s compliance department.Schenter has reached out to the media in defense of McKnight, saying he has “nothing to do with agents, marketing players or representing athletes,” and that he has no ties to USC, as he is a University of Washington fan.Schenter continued to explain that the vehicle belongs to a young woman named Johana Michelle Beltran, McKnight’s girlfriend, and that he helped her purchase the vehicle because the Beltran family was having trouble getting qualified for a loan.McKnight has denied driving the car, though a Times reporter has claimed to see him driving it more than one time.While everyone’s focus has shifted from McKnight to the NCAA basketball sanctions and Pete Carroll’s decision to become the head coach of the Seattle Seahawks, McKnight announced his decision to enter the NFL draft and leave USC a year early.“The time is right,” McKnight told ESPN. “This was my first healthy season and I really don’t want to come back and risk injury.”The time may be right in terms of injury, but his decision also comes at a time where intense speculation follows him all over the USC campus. McKnight, however, explained that these ongoing investigations and allegations do not have an impact on the decision he has made, but that other factors, like the comparison to former Trojan Reggie Bush, have solidified his NFL verdict.“If I would have come back it would have been to pursue the Heisman,” he said. “My career was OK. It was good, but not like Reggie. There was a constant pressure to be like Reggie.”McKnight has more in common with Bush than he might have wanted after the allegations made by the Times last month. USC is already under investigation by the NCAA along with the Pac-10 about the accusations that Bush (and basketball star O.J. Mayo, as well) received improper benefits during their time at school.McKnight’s decision to turn pro during this time in USC sports may be fortuitous, since, after Carroll’s resignation settled, the focus would have shifted back to McKnight.last_img read more

Read More

SHOCKING! Powers and Banku demand GHC50,000 each for May 15 bout

first_imgMichael Ayitey Powers and Braimah”Bukom Banku” Kamoko have told box Office promotions to cough up GHC 50,000 each for the Thursday, May 15 date or they will walk out of the bout.The fighters,in a surprising show of unity told Allsports.com.gh exclusively that they felt undervalued by the promoter who had failed to live up to his promises.According to Banku,they had no intention of pulling out but their demands were irrevocable.”We are prepared to fight on the 15th of May but the money the promoter is paying is not fine. If he can pay us GHS 50,000 each,the fight is on if not we will walk away because this is the biggest fight in Africa and it is pay per view.Powers supporting Banku’s demands said Box Office Promotions was yet to fulfill some of it’s promises.”What Banku is saying is true.This promoter told me that after he got sponsors he would increase the purse but till now he has not done so and wants to sign a contract with his mouth.I cannot do that because it’s my job.He has to pay us the GHS 50,000 each.I wanted GHS 60,000 but Banku asked us to reduce.” “If he won’t pay he should forget the fight and give it to somebody who has money to promote it.”This new development comes barely a day after the promoter was able to resolve a dispute over a date for the fight after the Ga Traditional Council asked for a postponement over the performance of rites for the Homowo festival.last_img read more

Read More

Tagoe- Momba bout media accreditation process opens

first_imgMedia institutions interested in covering the upcoming boxing bout between Emmanuel Tagoe and Sidicki Momba are urged to start sending in their request for accreditation.Interested parties are to send a scanned accreditation letter from their media house with accompanying scanned pictures of reporters to [email protected] by close of day Wednesday, December 24, 2014.The accreditation requests will be processed into a computerized system and will be ready for pickup by midday Thursday, December 25, 2014.It is worthy to note that no media personnel will be admitted to the limited space of the Boxing Day bout without the authentic accreditation tags to be issued by Baby Jet Promotions.Radio stations are entitled to two accreditation tags with three for television stations.The written press – newspaper and online are also entitled to one accreditation tag per media house.last_img read more

Read More