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Frost preparedness

first_imgby Emily Emshoff Many a gardener has spent a sunny October afternoon admiring his mums only to wake up the next morning to a winter wonderland and frostbitten flowers. Georgia’s first frost usually hits in the middle of November, but sometimes it sneaks into the state a little earlier. When it does, University of Georgia experts say it is good to have some supplies on hand and a game plan. One of the most effective ways to shield plants from frost is to cover them with any of a wide variety of materials, from high quality frost fabric, to blankets and sheets, to newspapers, baskets and straw. A supply of old comforters or heavy blankets — maybe purchased from local thrift store — will allow you to be ready for that first frost without spending much money. Gardeners should never use plastic sheeting to cover plants because plastic can trap too much heat when the day starts to warm up and actually cook or scorch the covered plant. It’s best to cover plants before sunset to retain some of the heat that is trapped in the soil and to remove the coverings in the morning to prevent the plants from suffocating. Simple mulches — like dead fall leaves or straw — are some of the best materials for protecting small plants and flowers, said Paul Thomas, a UGA Extension horticulturist. Gardeners can completely bury their flowers in either the leaves or straw, and then uncover them after the weather warms back up. The flowers will be fine, he said. Some gardeners save and store the first fallen leaves from their landscapes to use to protect their flowers from the frost during the fall or the next spring. “It sounds crazy, but if its your prize dahlia and you have a dahlia show coming up, then it’s definitely worth it,” Thomas said. There are also preventive measures you can take before the frost approaches. Stop fertilizing container gardens six to eight weeks before the first frost date. Finally, water plants two days before the frost is expected — or even the night before — because wet soil retains more heat than dry soil. Also add pine straw or other mulch to planting beds to keep your plant’s root systems from freezing. The same rules apply to vegetables. First, identify the plants that are most vulnerable to frost. If you’re lucky enough to still have tomatoes, cucumbers, beans, melons and squash growing in late October, keep in mind that they are very susceptible to frost damage. Many fall crops, like broccoli, pumpkins, carrots and beets, can handle a light frost. Whether the frost is expected, or not, it is important to be prepared and know what to do to save your garden. A few preventative measures and planning will keep you and your garden warm and happy.last_img read more

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5 video marketing trends to guide your credit union’s marketing strategy post-COVID

first_img 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Jackson Bolstad Details Videos under two minutes long get the most engagement. 85% of Facebook videos are watched without sound, while 60% of Instagram Stories are watched with the sound on. 33% of viewers will stop watching a video after 30 seconds, 45% by one minute, and 60% by two minutes. When viewing videos, 75% of people prefer to watch horizontally. 82% of people find it annoying to watch videos with a “black bar” where the video hasn’t been properly optimized to display in their chosen orientation.  Over the last few months, we’ve seen an explosion of video content across platforms like YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, and more. For the most part, quarantine has been a golden age for organic video content; and, if you’re like me, you’ve likely caught yourself in a YouTube spiral or the Instagram/Facebook vortex (watching video after video with no concept of time) more than once this quarantine. The power and reach of video has completely transformed the way we consume information and entertainment, thanks in part to an increased reliance on social media and digital technology, as well as the relative ease with which to make viral video content. Last year alone, individuals consumed on average 84 minutes of online video per day. With that number predicted to hit 100 minutes in 2021, and climb even higher in the coming years, a major part of your credit union’s marketing strategy now and beyond COVID-19 should definitely be focused on gaining a larger share of members/consumers’ extremely valuable screen time. Because online video is a dynamic and rapidly evolving marketing delivery channel, it’s vital to stay on top of the latest insights that can help your credit union create a stronger digital video marketing strategy for your members. Here are some important video marketing trends and statistics you should keep in mind as you plan your marketing and video strategy for a post-COVID world: Consumers prefer video ad content – With more than 57% of millennials watching more video ads on social media than on TV, video content has quickly morphed into the most effective tool for your credit union to build recognition, relevancy, and trust with young, new members in your community. Additionally, studies show that 54% of consumers want to see more video ad content from a brand or business they support, especially on social media. This trend bodes especially well for credit unions, who often have very loyal and engaged members/fans. Achieve a better ROI with video – When it comes to marketing your credit union’s products and service, video content has proven to be one of the most effective ways to engage new members and secure loans. With 73% of consumers claiming that they have been influenced by a brand’s social media presence when making a purchasing decision, video is critical to the ongoing success of your brand and credit union. In fact, the majority of of consumers visit a brand’s social media pages before visiting their website, with YouTube (#1), Facebook (#2), and Instagram (#3) being the top 3 purchase-driving platforms. Overall video ads are the #1 way consumers discovered a brand they later made a purchase from. To that end, 62% of people said they were more interested in a product after seeing it in a Facebook Story, and 1 in 4 consumers made a purchase after seeing a story on Instagram. Additionally, don’t underestimate the power of LinkedIn when it comes to your credit union’s business marketing efforts, as it is by far the number one lead generation platform for B2B.Video can help educate your members more effectively – Video has proven to be the best way to teach current and potential members about your products or services. In general, consumers retain 95% of a message when viewed through a video, versus 10% when reading it in text. Additionally, a study by HubSpot found that 72% of customers would rather learn about a product or service by way of video. This is being reflected in the fact that video marketers are choosing to develop more 30 second clips for video advertising than 15 second clips.  Video can increase your digital footprint and drive conversions –  With the algorithms of most major digital platforms now favoring video, it’s essential to start developing video content for both your website and social media. A video is 53 times more likely to show up on page one of Google than a traditional web page. Properly optimized video content can also help to increase your organic search traffic to your website by 157%, as well as boost the conversion rates on your product and service landing pages by up to 80%. And, on the social media front, videos generate 1,200% more shares than text and image content combined. Social media networks have long recognized the power and high engagement that comes with video content. Many have even altered their algorithms to prioritize video content on your members’ feed. Of note, if you regularly send emails to your members, adding video to your emails can potentially increase the click rate back to your website or landing page by nearly 300%.Make video content part of your long-term marketing strategy – Video is here to stay and your credit union would be wise to capitalize on its power and reach. It’s estimated that by 2022, 82 percent of the global internet traffic will come from video streaming and downloads. However, as you work to build out your strategy, there are a number of things to keep in mind regarding consumer preference and behavior, including:center_img Despite the prevalence and success of video content marketing, many credit unions and marketers continue to avoid it, often citing lack of time (23%), not knowing where to start (21%), too expensive (12%), and more. A good mixture of in-house and externally sourced video production can help to reduce the time and expense associated with video content. Additionally, marketers should be more focused on regularly developing and publishing engaging and creative video content, rather than production quality and technical aspects that can inhibit and bog down your video strategy.With just your iphone, a basic point-and-shoot camera with video capability, or even a base-level DSLR camera, as well as some simple tools (tripod, basic microphone, and ring light) it’s easy to get started. From there, you can start developing a variety of quick and easy video to bolster your social media and website, including educational videos, how-to product and service videos, news content, blog/article recaps, event promotion videos, thank you videos, testimonials, behind the scenes, Q&As with employees, mini-case studies, and more. A few pieces of advice for those of you just starting out: Be sure to plan out/storyboard your videos; also, consider developing a plug-and-play content series that you can publish on a regular cadence (check out this simple video series I created for Black Hills Federal Credit Union); and, finally, have fun!last_img read more

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Syracuse offense gets off to strong start but struggles late; Orange snaps 7-game losing streak to Pitt

first_img Published on October 7, 2012 at 11:57 pm Contact Ryne: [email protected] This time, the Syracuse offense clicked from the start. The Orange rolled down the field on its first drive, mixing four rushes and four passing plays to score the game’s first touchdown.“We were ready to go. We’ve had two weeks to prepare for this and we were just ready to go,” quarterback Ryan Nassib said. “We were anxious to get out there and start playing.”The eight-play, 70-yard drive was an impressive start as Nassib went 4-for-4 for 51 yards, and running back Adonis Ameen-Moore punched it across the goal line from 1 yard out. It was a stark contrast to SU’s first four games when it struggled to find its rhythm in the first half. The uncharacteristic fast start proved to be enough offense for SU in its 14-13 victory over Pittsburgh on Friday night, thanks to a stellar performance by the defense.Running back Jerome Smith took two straight carries 14 yards to get the offense going on the drive. Smith nodded his head as he walked confidently back to the huddle after his second carry, feeding off the energy generated by a three-and-out forced by the defense to open the game.Then Nassib went to work, moving SU to the 18 yard line with three completions. Three plays later, Ameen-Moore capped it with his first career touchdown.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I think when you come off a bye week, you want to go out early and have some success,” SU head coach Doug Marrone said. “Now, we didn’t maintain it during that game offensively. But to come out early and do that, I would have expected more.”But as Marrone said, the SU offense sputtered for the remainder of the game. The team marched inside the 10 in the second quarter, but ended in disappointment when Nassib’s pass for Marcus Sales in the end zone was picked off.Nassib said the team was too hyped up throughout the game and never found its focus. And Marrone said the unit is still searching for consistency.“You work on a bye week, you work on those things, you get the ball, you do a nice job and then bam, you want to get it again and keep going,” Marrone said. “We have a lot of work to do.”Syracuse ends Pittsburgh’s streak of dominanceJustin Pugh and the rest of the Syracuse seniors had yet to defeat Pittsburgh in their careers heading into Friday night’s matchup. They were part of a seven-game losing streak to the Panthers dating back to 2005.The Orange ended that streak with its victory over Pitt in the team’s Big East opener at the Carrier Dome.“It’s amazing. I looked back. We haven’t beaten them in eight years,” Pugh said. “So to go out there and beat that team and win it in like, a gritty way that we did, we kind of put the game on the offense’s hands and we feel good to come out and get that win.”The win also ended a five-game losing streak in the Big East. It was a much-needed victory for a team that appeared to be on its way to another losing season after a 1-3 start.Nassib said he hadn’t thought about the building pressure on the team to earn its first conference and Football Bowl Subdivision win since it defeated West Virginia on a Friday night last October.His focus was on the Panthers.“The only thing I wanted to do was come in today and beat Pitt,” Nassib said. “That was one of my personal goals this year and I’m glad I achieved it.”Broyld watches from the sidelinesAfter seeing time in each of Syracuse’s first four games, freshman running back Ashton Broyld wasn’t in the team’s plans on Friday night.“Our philosophy is that we play the best players that we feel give us the best chance to win,” Marrone said. “And that’s not just only Ashton Broyld, that’s a lot of other players on this team too.”The freshman remained on the sidelines for the duration of the Orange’s victory over Pittsburgh. Though he arrived as a talented playmaker after a year at Milford Academy, Broyld is still trying to carve out his role with SU in his first season.He was used as a receiver against Northwestern, making four catches for 28 yards. Against Stony Brook, he formed part of an efficient three-player rushing attack and finished with 61 yards and a touchdown on 10 carries. But Broyld was used sparingly against Minnesota and lost a fumble in the red zone. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Higginbotham and Smith return, Salakaia-Loto switches to six

first_imgThe pair will return on the bench, with Queensland also making two changes to their starting XV.Harry Hockings will start at lock, with Lukhan Salakaia-Loto shifting to flanker, while Angus Scott-Young will start at No.8 with Caleb Timu on the bench.Izack Rodda will also play, determined to help the Reds try and arrest the Crusaders record 17-game winning streak despite the death of his father last week.With each Super Rugby team having to rest its Wallabies at times in the lead-up to the World Cup, there had been some thought Rodda would take time off this week.But as he was last week, Rodda was determined to play and the Reds have respected his wishes. Queensland’s backline remains unchanged after causing headaches for the Highlanders in Dunedin.Coach Brad Thorn said it was good to have Higginbotham and Smith return.”They bring good experience and provide us with a strong bench,” he said.”Harry (Hockings) has been working hard at training and deserves his spot in the starting side this week.”Attack coach Jim McKay said thought had been given to starting Higginbotham and Smith, given their experience, but the starters had deserved to retain their places after the effort against the Highlanders.”There were discussions surrounding that but the other guys have done very well and on the back of last week where we played quite well — obviously we didn’t get the result we wanted to — we needed to recognise and reward that effort,” McKay said.”We’re confident in (the starters) but equally, we’re confident in the guys coming off the bench and doing a job for us as well.”last_img read more

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