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Capitol Watch: Vacation week ahead of legislative storms

first_imgIn the latest from Albany and Washington … both Congress and the New York Legislature were on break last week, but battles are brewing in both bodies. Rep. Tom Reed and the House will vote on President Trump’s national emergency declaration. Albany gears up for budget season, which, could be contentious even with full Democratic control over all three negotiating bodies.Rep. Tom Reed (23rd Congressional District)The House will vote on a resolution which would rescind President Trump’s proposed national emergency under the National Emergency Act of 1976. Rep. Tom Reed, after initially indicating he might buck the President by voting to rescind his declaration, doubled back last weekend. He said at a town hall event in Groton on Saturday that while he doesn’t agree with President Trump’s decision to declare the national emergency, legally, he has the right to do so.“I believe the President has the emergency authority to do what he’s done given the nature of the crisis and the concerns that we see at the border,” Reed said.Reed more precisely disagrees with the National Emergency Act as it’s currently written and said he would like to see any action to amend that law as part of this whole situation.“I would like to do is have a better resolution that pulls that authority, not only away from President Trump, but just like President Obama in certain areas went over executive overreach, executive action that I disagreed with. I would like to see if we rescind that authority under the National Emergency Act of 1976 and replace it with a more narrowly drafted piece of legislation so that we don’t have this open ended use of emergency authority by any president,” Reed said. Want more political coverage? Problems to Solve: Rep. Tom Reed discusses navigating a Democrat-controlled HouseCapitol Watch: Reed bucks Trump on emergency declaration, Lifton weighs in on recreational weedCapitol Watch: Child Victims Act, guns bills in Albany, mid-east treaties and a Green New Deal in Washington Reed was also asked about the ongoing situation in Venezuela, where the U.S. has formally recognized opposition leader Juan Guaidó as the interim president over Nicolas Maduro. Over the weekend, shipments of humanitarian aid were intercepted by the Maduro regime. One constituent asked at Reed’s town hall if he would support war in Venezuela.“Generally, I’ve been hesitant to support any type of military engagement overseas,” Reed replied. “I believe we’ve had too many of these long-term entanglements and so anytime there’s a discussion of that, I’m very skeptical to support it.”Reed then pivoted to criticize the socialist government of Venezuela under the Maduro regime. It’s also worth noting that Reed voted against removing U.S. support for Saudi Arabia in its war in Yemen a few weeks ago.As people across the country have begun filing their tax returns, many finding a much smaller check from Uncle Sam, Reed has taken to defending the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act which he helped write. He told Cheddar last week the savings from the tax cuts were up front, and weren’t meant to be reimbursed as part of tax returns.“I haven’t heard any concern. I’ve spoken with the chair, Assemblyman Cusick, and he was very positive about the bill. He said he was eager to do it.”Assemblywoman Barbara Lifton (D-125th Assembly District)A bill that would permanently halt plans to build a highly controversial trash incinerator in the Seneca Army Depot facility between Seneca and Cayuga lakes in Romulus is going before the Assembly Energy Committee this week. Assemblywoman Barbara Lifton helped craft the bill which she also cosponsors, but it is technically sponsored by chairman of the energy committee, Staten Island Assemblyman Michael Cusick. Republicans like state Senator Pamela Helming have also signaled support against the trash incinerator.Despite some early confusion on who would draft the legislation and how it would be worded to be pushed through and signed into law, Lifton says the bill is making progress and she hasn’t heard of any major hurdles in its way.“I haven’t heard any concern,” Lifton said in an interview last week. “I’ve spoken with the chair, Assemblyman Cusick, and he was very positive about the bill. He said he was eager to do it.” Your government news is made possible with support from: Tagged: Albany, andrew cuomo, barbara lifton, capitol watch, chuck schumer, kirsten gillibrand, politics, Tom Omara, tom reed The majority of the Legislature’s time over the next few weeks will be absorbed with negotiations surrounding the state budget. One of the ideas put forward by Gov. Andrew Cuomo as part of his executive budget proposal would cut the Aid and Incentives for Municipalities (AIM) or state revenue sharing with local governments. He has since revised the idea to have counties disburse newly collected internet sales tax revenues to make up for the loss.“This is not a restoration of AIM funding,” Lifton said, joining the growing voices on both sides of the aisle against the cut.She believes that, since sales tax revenue is already collected by counties, the state suggesting that revenue be sent to other subsidiary governments is an overreach by the state trying to direct localities on how to spend their revenue. She said she believes the state should do more to fund local governments, as is technically legally required.“I think that was an important principle that was enshrined in law. We all know that local governments do so much to help create the prosperity of our state,” she said.Since the Assembly was on recess, Lifton hadn’t spoken directly with her colleagues on the matter, but thought that the chamber’s Democratic majority would oppose the proposal.Senator Tom O’Mara (R-58th N.Y. Senate District)State Senator Tom O’Mara has also strongly opposed the Governor’s proposed cuts to AIM.“It’s an outrageous move to add another unfunded state mandate on counties when they are already struggling to get out from under one of America’s biggest piles of unfunded state mandates,” O’Mara said in a written statement last week.O’Mara also added that he believes the governor is pushing the proposal as a way to work against local governments and Upstate New York.Another legislative initiative has been floating around Albany for a few months now — the legalization of recreational marijuana. Gov. Cuomo pushed the initiative as part of his early proposals on criminal justice reform. Legalization efforts have since faced some pressure in the Legislature where some members, like O’Mara say they want to tread carefully on the issue.“Let’s do this right, if it’s done at all,” O’Mara said. “A step as significant as this one cannot and should not be taken because of pure political expediency. It needs to be a more deliberative and careful legislative process that includes public hearings and a full public airing of the benefits and the dangers.”Separate from recreational marijuana, the rollout of industrial hemp was already legalized in New York State, a move that has since been echoed on the national level with Congress removing hemp, which is in the cannabis family, from the federal schedule of controlled substances. While the move opens up a lot of opportunity, it also widens competition with other states across the country.O’Mara worked on the rollout of the initial program, and is excited to see the sector developing.“The response to the foundation we have put down over the past several years has been outstanding and exciting,” he said.But, he also had criticism of Gov. Cuomo, who he claims has slowed development on hemp by lumping regulation of the crop in with medical marijuana, which is grown, processed and maintained on different standards.“The Cuomo administration and the New York State bureaucracy is dragging its feet on decoupling industrial hemp from its marijuana regulatory framework and that, unfortunately, still is a significant roadblock in the way of progress for this industry in New York State,” O’Mara said. “That needs to change, the sooner the better.”U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand & U.S. Senate Minority Leader Chuck SchumerSenator Kirsten Gillibrand and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer addressed the situation in Venezuela last week. They said they both oppose embattled President Nicolas Maduro’s blockage of humanitarian aid from being shipped into the country from the U.S..The Maduro regime must end its violence and let food and medicine get to their people from Colombia and Brazil. America should stand with the Venezuelan people and our allies to take diplomatic and humanitarian steps, and press Maduro to accept a peaceful, democratic resolution.— Kirsten Gillibrand (@SenGillibrand) February 25, 2019 Sen. Gillibrand took advantage of her week off to take another trip out to Iowa, touring the early caucus state in her bid for the presidency in 2020. However, Gillibrand’s trip didn’t enthrall one Iowa restaurant goer who was a little more interested in ranch dressing than New York’s junior senator. Vaughn Golden Vaughn Golden is a freelance radio and print reporter covering politics around the southern tier and central New York. He authors the weekly “Capitol Watch” watchdog report on Ithaca’s representatives… More by Vaughn Goldenlast_img read more

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Commission studies how many justices are enough

first_img December 15, 2000 Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Regular News Commission studies how many justices are enough Commission studies how many justices are enough Senior Editor Expanding the Florida Supreme Court from seven to nine members might help with writing opinions but probably would delay decisions as well as be more expensive, according to the chief justice of the Washington Supreme Court. Chief Justice Richard P. Guy spoke by telephone to the November 17 meeting of the legislature’s Supreme Court Workload Study Commission. The commission also heard from First District Court of Appeal Judge Marguerite Davis on the history of the Supreme Court’s jurisdiction and from the chair of The Florida Bar’s Appellate Practice Certification Committee. Members also discussed a report on the court’s caseload and about beginning to make recommendations at their next meeting, tentatively set for January. “The advantage to having nine [justices] is if you have a large caseload, you can distribute the workload, and so perhaps it is done more quickly,” Guy said. “From a purely administrative standpoint, it takes longer to get cases out the more judges you have,” because it’s harder to get the increased number of judges to agree on an opinion. He noted he’s sat pro tem on a three-judge intermediate court of appeal panel, and it was much easier and faster to get consensus. Commission Chair Stephen Grimes, a former Florida Supreme Court justice, asked Guy if he would recommend a nine- or seven-justice court for Florida. “If you’re talking about from an administrative standpoint, I would stay at seven,” he replied. “It’s a lot easier to work together collegially.” Guy touched on several other issues, including death penalty cases. He prompted chuckles when he said Washington has 13 people on death row. Commissioners were told at their last meeting that Florida has more than 370 death row inmates, and handling their cases takes 30 to 40 percent of the Florida Supreme Court’s time. “We’ll trade you,” Grimes dryly told Guy. While complex, Guy said, death appeals, both direct and collateral, don’t take up an inordinate amount of the court’s time, and it handles an average of six such appeals a year. He also said the average time to handle a direct appeal is a year and about six months for a collateral appeal. Guy noted that if the justices don’t handle an appeal within a year, they are required to explain why to the governor’s office. In the report presented to the commission, statistics showed the typical direct appeal takes about two years and nine months inlast_img read more

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Eric Hall: Former football agent dies aged 73 | Football News

first_imgHall, believed to have suffered with underlying health issues, died peacefully with his nephew Michael by his side. Eric Hall worked closely alongside former England boss Terry VenablesImage:Hall worked closely alongside former England boss Terry Venables He also represented former England manager Terry Venables.- Advertisement – Former football agent and music promoter Eric Hall has died aged 73 after a short battle with coronavirus.Hall, often spotted with a cigar and using his catchphrase ‘monster monster’, began his career in the music industry as a record promoter and worked with the likes of Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, Marc Bolan, the Sex Pistols and Queen.- Advertisement – Lord Alan Sugar led tributes on Monday, posting on Twitter: “Football agent Eric Hall has passed away. He was a real character RIP.”Former Liverpool and Tottenham striker Paul Walsh added: “Very sad to hear of the passing of monster monster Eric Hall a real character. My thoughts are with the family, a monster RIP to Eric.” Former footballer agent Eric Hall has passed away Image:Hall was often spotted with a cigar and using his catchphrase ‘monster monster’ He then returned to his original passion of music and up until his death, worked as a radio presenter on a weekly show playing classic hits from the 1950s and 1960s.- Advertisement – He then got his break in football after a chance meeting with former Tottenham player Steve Perryman and went on to represent some of the biggest names in the early years of the Premier League.Players on his books included Dennis Wise, Tim Sherwood, Paul Walsh, John Fashanu and Neil ‘Razor’ Ruddock. – Advertisement – Football agent Eric Hall has passed away. He was a real character R.I.P.— Lord Sugar (@Lord_Sugar) November 16, 2020 As a football agent, Hall claimed to have secured the first-ever goals and appearance bonuses for players – even securing a goal bonus for Newcastle United goalkeeper Dave Beasant.In 1997, he was forced to take six months off work after contracting E.coli and that put an end to his career in football.last_img read more

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No. 7 Syracuse comes back to go undefeated in ACC, downs UNC, 13-12

first_img Published on April 14, 2018 at 6:31 pm Contact Matt: [email protected] Alex Bassil’s head slumped in front of his body.The junior peered down at the turf, then back up at the white ball in the back of the net, then back down at the turf. To his left, Brendan Bomberry paraded around the left corner of the end zone. Bomberry’s teammates smothered him and the Carrier Dome crowd echoed that sentiment.“It’s been that kind of season,” North Carolina head coach Joe Breschi said. “Consoling them is tough. You make a save and you’re smiling. You don’t and your miserable.”The differences in emotion encapsulated Saturday’s contest between the two teams. North Carolina (6-7, 0-3 Atlantic Coast) looked primed for an upset in the Dome, a place the Tar Heels have not won at since 1991. For 56 minutes, No. 7 Syracuse (7-4, 4-0) couldn’t match UNC’s intensity, its desperation. But with the game on the line, Syracuse rose to the occasion in overtime while North Carolina folded in defeat.The win gives Syracuse a perfect record in the ACC for the second-consecutive season and a second-straight No. 1 seed in the conference tournament in Charlottesville, Virginia, in two weeks’ time. Syracuse has not lost an regular-season ACC game in 742 days. The Orange’s prize for a perfect conference record is a date with Virginia on the Cavaliers home turf in the first round.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“We made a lot of mistakes,” Syracuse head coach John Desko said. “This is going to be a long film session on Monday, but all in all to come out with a win, this was a good experience for us.”But North Carolina narrowly missed sneaking in a win against SU in the Dome. With 7:22 left, UNC led 12-9 and still led 12-10 with 4:26 remaining.All game, SU failed to convert on its opportunities while the Tar Heels took advantage. When the scoreboard read 12-9, the game was puzzling because SU was beating UNC in nearly every facet of the game including shots, ground balls, faceoffs and penalties.During the first half, SU’s struggles came offensively. The Orange won 60 percent of its first-half faceoffs and shot 17 times, but could only convert on four opportunities, including one on a man-up opportunity, and turned the ball over seven times.“I didn’t think we had very good possessions,” Desko said. “I wasn’t happy with our shot selection. Very sloppy.”But while the offense failed to convert on its chances, the defense held UNC in check. The Tar Heels mirrored SU with 17 shots, four goals and seven turnovers in the first 30 minutes.Come the second half, UNC began to convert, while the Orange focused on playing catch-up. The two sides combined for eight goals in the third quarter, matching the total from the entire first half.Neither team played defense, Desko said, and instead, the game was focused on quick, forced shots, that often led to turnovers or wild misses. Despite scoring three goals in the period, SU struggled to keep pace with UNC. And the same happened in the fourth quarter. After two quick Nate Solomon goals to begin the final period and tie the game at 9-9, UNC rattled off three scores to take a seemingly commanding 12-9 lead.It wasn’t looking promising, Desko said. The game was coming to a close with UNC on top. Over the next three minutes, SU recorded just one shot and failed to get open looks. But with the game on the line, Brendan Curry took over.After Stephen Rehfuss cut UNC’s lead to two, Curry raced around the right side of Bassil, separating himself from his defender before turning over his left shoulder and firing a shot into the back of the net. Fifty seconds later, he used that speed to beat Cole Haverty and rip another shot past Bassil.The freshman opened up his arms for his teammates to come hug him after punching the air and screaming to the ceiling.When the game mattered most, SU battled back. After a potential UNC game-winner missed wide to force overtime, SU won the opening possession in the extra period before the two Brendans – Curry to Bomberry – connected for the game-winning goal.“You just saw how hard he was going to the goal,” Desko said. “We were feeling it with him and we decided that’s who we wanted to have the ball at the end of the game.”Syracuse won on the stat sheet but couldn’t take advantage on the scoreboard until the last four minutes of the game. In its last 15 one-goal games, Syracuse is 13-2.Despite UNC’s effectiveness for 56 minutes, and SU’s lack of it, the Orange proved itself once again in its most important moment. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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