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Passenger numbers continue to increase at Shannon Airport

first_imgBusinessNewsPassenger numbers continue to increase at Shannon AirportBy Editor – April 26, 2017 1308 Urgent action needed to ensure Regional Air Connectivity One of the world’s most unusual aircraft arrives at Shannon Airport WhatsApp Print Twitter TAGSfeaturedShannon airportShannon Group Linkedin New Shannon Group property shortlisted in major national awards to select the Building of the Year 2021 Shannon Airport “has been abandoned” center_img Sad day for Limerick and Mid-West following Aer Lingus announcement – Mayor Michael Collins RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Previous articleFrom classics to mod for Summer PromsNext articleUL to host International Rugby festival Editor Shannon AirportMatthew Thomas, CEO of Shannon Group plcShannon Airport has seen an increase in passenger numbers for the fourth year in succession, leading to a turnover of €67.2 in 2016, up by over 2% on 2015.Announcing his first annual results as CEO of Shannon Group following his appointment last year, Matthew Thomas said that a continuation of the company’s improving financial performance is necessary to enable it to undertake critical investments across its business units.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “The Shannon Group has a unique mix of complementary businesses that, more than any other commercial entity in the region, gives it the potential to positively influence economic development.  For example, 16 companies who announced new or expanded operations in 2016 in the Mid-West, which was the fastest growing region outside of Dublin last year, cited the global connectivity at Shannon Airport as a key influencer in their decision to invest here,” he said.Said Chairman Rose Hynes: “Shannon Group plays a pivotal role in both the regional and national economy. We provide the essential connectivity service within our wider region enabling the continued development and growth of commerce and tourism.  Shannon Group strongly supports the National Planning Framework. It is critical to delivering the environment to achieve effective regional development.  The Framework will create an environment that promotes effective economic development across the regions and relieves the pressure on Dublin.”Shannon Group confirmed that its passenger numbers  increased for the fourth consecutive year since independence in 2013, with over 1.748 million passengers flying through the airport, a 2% increase on 2015 and a 24% increase since separation in 2013.  Shannon Airport currently operates services to 35 destinations in 11 countries and last year gained new routes including to Edinburgh, winter services to Fuerteventura and Malaga, additional flights to Lanzarote and additional capacity on a range of existing routes.2016 was a positive year in terms of new business development for the airport, with four airlines – Scandinavian Airlines, Lufthansa, Norwegian Air International and Kuwait Airways – all announcing operations at Shannon. This is the first time in 10 years that four carriers, new to the Shannon schedule, announced services in one year.Shannon Heritage experienced significant growth in 2016, with visitor numbers at its day-time attractions and evening entertainment venues in Clare, Limerick, Galway and Dublin growing by 30% overall. In all, over 904,000 people visited the popular visitor attractions, which include Bunratty Castle and Folk Park, King John’s Castle and Malahide Castle and Gardens. Also included in these figures, for the first time, is the Shannon Heritage managed GPO Witness History visitor centre, which opened in Dublin at the end of March 2016 and attracted over 160,000 visitors in its first nine months. Facebook King John’s Castle Limerick reopens with new medieval themed outdoor games Advertisement Emaillast_img read more

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PDC Energy to acquire rivals SRC Energy for $1.7bn

first_img Image: PDC Energy, SRC Energy sign £1.4bn deal. Photo: courtesy of John R Perry/Pixabay. PDC Energy has agreed to acquire rival US oil and gas company SRC Energy for about $1.7bn (£1.39bn) in an all-stock transaction to create a premier mid-cap operator with peer-leading cost structure and free cash flow profile.The total consideration includes SRC Energy’s net debt of around $685m (£560.53m) as of 30 June 2019.Based in Colorado, PDC Energy operates in the state’s Wattenberg Field and also in the Delaware Basin in West Texas. The company’s operations are centred on the liquid-rich horizontal Niobrara and Codell plays in the Wattenberg Field and the liquid-rich Wolfcamp zones located in the Delaware Basin.SRC Energy, which is also based in Colorado, has been operating since 2008. The company’s oil and gas assets are located mainly in the Wattenberg Field in the Denver-Julesburg Basin (DJ Basin) in northeast Colorado.Following the merger, PDC Energy will expand its acreage in Wattenberg to nearly 182,000 net acres, of which almost 100% is located in Weld County, Colorado.The second quarter 2019 total production of the enlarged company is around 200,000 barrels of oil equivalent (Boe) per day. The combined company is expected to become the second largest producer in the DJ Basin, and will also hold nearly 36,000 net acres of acreage in Delaware Basin.PDC Energy president and CEO Bart Brookman said: “SRC’s complementary, high-quality assets in the Core Wattenberg, coupled with our existing inventory and track record of operational excellence will create a best-in-class operator with the size, scale and financial positioning to thrive in today’s market.“We remain committed to our core Delaware Basin acreage position and are confident the combined company with its multi-basin focus will be well-positioned to deliver superior shareholder returns.”Terms of the PDC Energy, SRC Energy mergerAs per the transaction terms, SRC Energy shareholders will exchange each of their shares with 0.158 of PDC Energy shares. Post-merger, PDC Energy’s shareholders will own nearly 62% stake in the combined company, while SRC Energy’s shareholders will own the remaining 38% stake.SRC Energy CEO and chairman Lynn Peterson said: “We believe that this transaction will establish the combined company as a leader in the Colorado energy industry. The transaction also provides SRC shareholders with the opportunity to participate in the significant upside potential created by a larger-scale DJ Basin producer with complementary assets in the prolific Delaware Basin.”The deal is likely to be completed in the fourth quarter of 2019. The merger of the two oil and natural gas exploration and production companies is expected to create the second largest producer in the DJ Basin last_img read more

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Group discusses diversity, inclusion

first_imgIn Wednesday night’s Student Senate meeting, senior Luis Llanos, chair of the diversity council, and junior Carolina Ramirez, student government liaison to the diversity council, presented the council’s resolution in support of recent changes to community life and its recommendations to the University for moving forward. Ramirez said the resolution praises the University’s many useful resources for combating discrimination and harassment on campus, including speakup.nd.edu. “We’ve also received a lot of great feedback for the new training that rectors and hall staff went through,” she said. “Our goal is to make sure everyone feels welcome in the dorms regardless of their backgrounds.” However, Llanos said the resolution proposes suggestions for improvement in these areas. “We’re requesting that a visible statement of inclusion be placed in each classroom,” Llanos said. “This is about making sure everyone – students, faculty and staff – feels ‘at home under the dome.’” The resolution also recommends Halal and Kosher foods be made accessible to students with dietary restrictions, that it be made mandatory for faculty and staff to attend diversity in-services, that the University add a “cultural enrichment” course requirement, and that Notre Dame increase efforts to recruit and retain ethnically and culturally diverse faculty members. Senior Daniel Colston, director of internal affairs, said the crucifix that already hangs in each room on campus is already an effective symbol of inclusion.  “If I were to say a racially insensitive slur, seeing a piece of paper up on the wall wouldn’t prevent me from doing that more than Jesus would,” he said. The resolution also suggested rectors be “required to collaborate in the process of choosing a Freshman Orientation staff.”  “We want to get the word out to students – especially students from diverse backgrounds – that it’s important to be a part of their dorms. … What we hope to do is to push them to be a part of the Frosh-O staff so that the freshmen have a better time,” Llanos said. “… Frosh-O can really play a huge role in how your freshman year goes, and we really want everyone to have someone not only they can trust, but who can empathize with them.” Alumni Hall senator Juan Jose Daboub said the suggested changes to Frosh-O are too extreme. “I feel like we’re trying to put people in a bubble and protect them from all of this. And it’s great that we’re trying to help them, but what if in the end we’re actually hindering them?” Daboub said. “What if they get into the real world and they realize they’re not going to be babied?” Llanos said he does not think these measures “baby” students.  “The only thing we’re looking for is for people to feel at home. It’s not babying, it’s just saying, ‘Hey, don’t transfer. Why are you miserable?’ I think that’s the Catholic thing to do,” Llanos said. Contact Margaret Hynds at [email protected]d.edulast_img read more

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Student body presidential candidates: Mario Markho and Charlie Ortega Guifarro

first_imgWho they are:Presidential candidate Mario Markho is a junior neuroscience major in Keough Hall from Toledo, Ohio. His running mate, Charlie Ortega Guifarro, is a Film, Television and Theatre major with minors in photography and the Journalism, Ethics and Democracy program. Ortega is a junior hailing from Miami currently living in Stanford Hall. They are joined by campaign manager and junior Tiffany Rojas, an off-campus economics major. All three are members of the Balfour-Hesburgh Scholars Program.Top Priority: Reducing dorm inequalityWhile neither Markho nor Ortega have experience working in student government, their respective experiences at Notre Dame prompted in them a desire to give back to the student body and help those with similar backgrounds feel more welcomed, especially in light of the recently implemented three-years-on-campus policy. The two created a comprehensive and practical platform based on improving student life, building on already-existing programs and providing clarity in dealings with the administration.One of the largest areas the two hope to tackle is the longstanding issue of dorm inequality, both within and across residential life. Infrastructure-wise, this includes plans to give fans to dorms without AC and to establish more sound pipelines for repairs and maintenance issues. Socially, the two hope to curb a negative drinking culture and the ever-present danger of sexual assault by establishing clear guidelines for registering parties, adjusting parietal times and implementing a first-time forgiveness policy for all parietals offenses. Holistically, the ticket also hopes to establish an art initiative within residence halls and establish regular opportunities for Confession within dorms.Best Idea: Online registration and scheduling for St. Liam’s and UCCThe Markho-Ortega ticket has a number of insightful suggestions for improving student life, but perhaps none are more practical and feasible than online scheduling for St. Liam’s. While the University already has online scheduling software in place for things as simple as booking a haircut appointment, attempting to schedule an appointment with a psychologist, psychiatrist or physician requires calling or going in person. Adopting this technology for University Health Services would not only be a welcome upgrade, it would also streamline its service and allow for scheduling beyond business hours.Worst Idea: Move parietals to 2 a.m. on Thursdays On one hand, the ticket’s rationale for parietal reform is well-intended; it was created in response to the University’s recent Campus Climate survey, which found that many individuals will choose to not leave situations that put them at risk for sexual assault for fear of punishment. However, the solution Markho and Ortega offer lacks prudence. On their platform, the two justify the time extension with the fact that “countless students have complained that [the parietals] extension does not apply to Thursdays, a night when most students still go out,” but disregard the glaring correlation between party culture and sexual assault. Rather than help the problem, the situation could potentially grow worse with such a change.Most Feasible: Promote a State of the Union / Town Hall to the student bodyAnother key facet of the ticket’s platform is promoting clarity within student government, a part of the organization that has struggled to remain consistent in recent years. The simple yet effective tool of organizing a bi-semester “State of the Union” would force the team to be transparent on its dealings with the University, as well as hold it accountable for implementing its campaign promises.Least Feasible: Establish an extra reading dayWhile not a bad idea in theory, the campaign’s hope to establish not one, but two extra reading days — one per semester — would require putting an incredible amount of pressure on the University and the provost’s office to even consider such a change. It’s extremely doubtful the administration would consider rewriting the academic calendar.Bottom Line: Well-intentioned, but lacking experienceMarkho-Ortega have clearly put work in to building what may be the most concrete platform in the election, and the ticket has many ideas which reflect a practical and insightful lens into where the University falls short. But running through many of their proposals is a common theme of naivete — the two may say they are running on the strength of their platform and not their clout with administrators, but a number of their policies realistically require a tremendous amount of influence that past administrations with much more experience have not even attempted. With just a one-year term, it would frankly be shocking if Markho and Ortega were able to move the University to forgive parietal offenses, publish CIFs or a complete breakdown of tuition. Additionally, several of the campaign’s ideas — such as section funds for resident assistants — are already standard University policy. While the ticket’s best ideas reflect an refreshing outside approach, their inexperience overshadows such proposals.Tags: 2019 Student Government Electionlast_img read more

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Lawmakers pass workers’ comp legislation

first_imgLawmakers pass workers’ comp legislation June 15, 2003 Daniel Staesser Assistant Editor Regular News Lawmakers pass workers’ comp legislation Assistant EditorAfter regular session and the onslaught of testimony, rewrites, and amendments, and the eventual lack of resolve, special session SB 50-A put an end to the issue of workers’ compensation — for now — when it passed near adjournment on May 27.It is an end, however, reached by a means harmful to both Florida’s workers and their attorneys, despite the projected 12.35 percent reduction in premiums, according to critics of the bill.“I don’t think it was legislation that was well thought through,” said Rafael Gonzalez, immediate past chair of the Bar’s Workers’ Compensation Section.Gonzalez’s concern was shared by Sen. Skip Campbell, D-Tamarac, who recently resigned from the Senate Finance and Taxation Committee, of which he was chair, to protest the bill.The concerns are over the decreases in benefits for Florida’s workers. Injured workers seeking permanent total disability (PTD) benefits now bear a burden of establishing that they are not capable of sedentary employment, which involves the lifting of just a few pounds. The standards by which a PTD is measured makes the burden of proving such an injury even heavier. Unless the carrier or employer finds the employee is physically capable of engaging in sedentary employment within a 50-mile radius of the employee’s residence, the employee must have one of the following injuries:• Spinal cord injury involving severe paralysis of an arm, a leg, or the trunk.• Amputation of an arm, hand, foot, etc. with effective loss of that appendage.• Severe brain or closed head injury.• Second or third degree burns to at least 25 percent of the body.• Total or industrial blindness.The bill allows for one independent medical examination per accident rather than one per medical specialty, requiring the carrier to pay for only one. In addition, preexisting medical conditions or disabilities are excluded as payable injuries.Under the bill, benefits for PTD claims will cease at age 75 unless the employee is not eligible for Social Security benefits. The supplementary cost-of-living benefits, which drop from 5 percent to 3 percent, stop at age 62, excepting the same stipulation.Impairment benefits for permanent partial disability claims, percentages determined by the Florida Impairment Guide, have been reduced to about 25 percent of the worker’s average weekly wage, if that employee is able to earn the same wage or greater after the injury. The duration of the benefit would be changed from the current three weeks for each percent of determined impairment to the following schedule:• Two weeks for each percent of impairment from 1 to 10 percent.• Three weeks for each percent of impairment from 11 to 15 percent.• Four weeks for each percent of impairment from 16 to 20 percent.• Six weeks for each percent of impairment from 21 percent and higher.Not all benefits were cut by the bill, however, with funeral expenses increasing from $5,000 to $7,500 and death benefits for dependants increasing from $100,000 to $150,000.Another thing that the bill did was raise medical fee reimbursements to 110 percent of Medicare and 140 percent of Medicare for surgical procedures.“That’s one good thing that needed to be addressed, and it was,” said Gonzalez. However, he had reservations in other areas of the bill, specifically attorneys’ fees, which, as an alternative to the contingency fee schedule, may be capped, per the determination of a judge of compensation claims, at $1,500 per lifetime of the claim, based on a maximum hourly rate of $150 per hour.“If you are a working injured worker and there are no benefits due to you and someone denies you an MRI, or whatever the medical issue may be, I think that you are going to have a hard time finding an attorney to work 40 or 50 hours for no more than $1,500,” said Gonzalez.Other issues addressed by the bill include compliance and procedural changes in a system riddled with fraud. Employers that fail to pay incur stop-work order penalties, which unless paid makes them ineligible for an exemption from coverage. Carriers are required to provide an annual report regarding losses and recoveries, and the Bureau of Workers’ Compensation Fraud and the Division of Workers’ Compensation are to provide annual reports regarding compliance and enforcement activities.Despite efforts in these areas and the estimated reduction in premiums, Gonzalez has his doubts and remembers the last major changes to workers’ comp legislation in 1993, stemming from the effects of legislation from 1989 and 1990.“It just hadn’t been enough time to see the changes,” said Gonzalez. “It just doesn’t happen that way. It will take a while to sort of cleanse away older claims. I think in a year’s time they might come back and say, ‘Look we’ve been paying the same amount.’“We have yet to hear of any carrier come out and publicly say they are going to reduce premiums,” said Gonzalez. “There is no guarantee that will happen. There is nothing in this bill to say that the carrier must lower premiums.”With no guarantees, justifying considerable reductions in both workers’ benefits and attorneys’ fees becomes a tough task, making it obvious why the issue was so hotly debated during regular session and put on Gov. Jeb Bush’s priority list for special session.“I have been talking to people on the phone who have called and who weren’t practitioners of workers’ comp and could not believe what was going on,” said Gonzalez, who realizes the impact this legislation will have on all Floridians.“I say it out loud, and still just can’t believe it.”last_img read more

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RBC Heritage: Shane Lowry holds solo lead on crowded leaderboard

first_imgDustin Johnson is three shots back at 3 under.🎯@DJohnsonPGA is now four back.#QuickHits pic.twitter.com/MMkqYhqObQ— PGA TOUR (@PGATOUR) April 18, 2019Matt Kuchar and Webb Simpson are at 2 under.Matt Kuchar leads the TOUR in Greens in Regulation (75.76%).Here’s why. #QuickHits pic.twitter.com/gdymjucIyy— PGA TOUR (@PGATOUR) April 18, 2019And Ian Poulter and Bryson DeChambeau are at 1 under. Michael Jordan: Tiger Woods’ Masters win ‘was the greatest comeback I’ve ever seen’ There’s plenty of golf left to be played but there are lots of good scores to be shot as 75 players are currently at even par or better.Two players not part of that group include Cameron Champ, who has been dealing with some injuries, and Francesco Molinari, who just last week blew a lead on the back nine at the Masters.Those two men are at 3 over for the tournament. Michael Phelps recounts viral Masters moment watching Tiger Woodscenter_img Billy Horschel and Patrick Cantlay are part of that group.Looks like @RyanPalmerPGA has it rolling.He’s just two off the lead.#QuickHits pic.twitter.com/ijIu8I2JDz— PGA TOUR (@PGATOUR) April 18, 2019Just one week removed from the Masters, a lot of big names are not in attendance, but some very highly ranked players are on the course and playing well. Related News Shane Lowry had a great day at the RBC Heritage shooting a 6-under 65 to move into the solo lead, but his first-place spot is far from comfortable.Five players, including Ryan Moore and Ryan Palmer, are one shot back at 5 under, while another eight are two shots back.last_img read more

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