Tag: 一品楼 黑龙江信息

Grandmother delights Limerick

first_imgFacebook Advertisement THERE was a Mardi Gras atmosphere in Limerick City on Friday as the Royal de Luxe Giant Grandmother took to the streets. She began her journey at 10 am, greeting those who had patiently waited for her to wake up with the words, “Long live Limerick” before setting off to meet the thousands who lined the roads to greet her.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Cheers and gasps of wonder preceded the 25 foot-high Giant the 26 Lilliputians who help her to make the journey.Roars of laughter were prompted by her taking a widdle on O’Connell Street and people sat on the ground to hear her tell the story of the Vikings and Limerick. The key event in City of Culture 2014 brought crowds into the city to see her walk, sleep, tell stories through an interpreter and smile at her many fans.Up to 70,000 people are expected to turn out on Saturday and almost as many on Sunday to see the second leg of her journey and her departure by boat down the River Shannon.Most of the city centre was closed off for long periods today, but Gardai said the majority of people were very coperative and understanding. NewsBreaking newsGrandmother delights LimerickBy Bernie English – September 5, 2014 580 Print Emailcenter_img Previous articleExplosion during Granny’s visitNext articleBusiness blooming for Grandmother Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. WhatsApp Twitter Linkedinlast_img read more

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For her, home is the heart of the matter

first_imgThis is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.When Dana McKinney was a girl, her family drove every week from their small town in Fairfield County, Conn., to Sunday dinner at her grandmother’s home in Newark, N.J. To a child who loved dance and art, the changing scenery on those trips revealed stark contrasts that stung of economic inequality.“I was going back and forth between a very comfortable lifestyle in Connecticut to a very depressed environment in Newark and became really inspired to look at how people can affect the built environment,” McKinney said. “I want to be able to fix this! — That was my immediate reaction — I’ll be an architect!”After studying architecture at Princeton University, McKinney came to Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) in 2012 to earn master’s degrees in architecture and urban planning. It’s an unusual and demanding course of study, but one McKinney felt would merge her design work with her interest in social change, social justice, and the power of architecture to transform people’s lives.“I want to make beautiful spaces and buildings, but I don’t want … the pitfall of only working with elite clients, and I think a lot of times architects end up serving a very high-income population. A majority of housing is done by developers in the U.S., [so] good architecture barely reaches outside a certain economic class,” McKinney said.Much of her academic work has focused on how design and living interact: improving elderly housing and studying the effects from the abrupt closure in 2014 of a large homeless facility in Boston.But with one in four Newark residents likely to spend some time in prison, McKinney’s thesis focused on “sensible and sensitive” design alternatives to prison that would help break the cycle of incarceration and poverty. It was an unconventional choice. When she put her idea before her faculty advisers, “I could hear the crickets in the room,” she said. But “by the end of it, they were all about it.”While McKinney doesn’t believe architecture alone can end homelessness or poverty or incarceration, she does believe the field has something important to offer. “Everyone has a role in social development and in making sure that our society is a reflection of what we want it to be.”Indeed, though “spatial justice” is often thought of as an enterprise in the public realm, like the construction of parks and community centers, it’s not as frequently addressed in the private realm. Because housing is essential to well-being, McKinney hopes to eventually create spaces that promote not just equality, but equity. “Your self-worth and what you need to do well as a person starts with the safety and comfort you feel in your own home,” she explained.Outside the classroom, McKinney has been active in bringing together African-American students at GSD and shining a spotlight on black women and men in a field where only 1 percent of architects are African-American.Having sometimes found herself one of only two black students in a class of 80, McKinney was among the earliest members of the African-American Student Union five years ago, serving last year as its president. The group grew from six to 30 members, promoting the work of black design professionals, doing outreach to high school students considering architecture as a career, strategizing ways GSD could recruit more black students, and offering guidance to prospective applicants.Perhaps most important, the group afforded its members respite from feelings of isolation. “For a lot of us, it made life at Harvard go by a little bit faster [to] know that we had a really supportive community for one another,” McKinney said.In 2013, McKinney and some of her classmates orchestrated a clandestine visit to Harvard by rapper Kanye West and his wife, Kim Kardashian. West, who started a design firm in 2012, spoke privately to students about his interest in architecture and his belief that design “can save the world.” (This started with the hand-delivery of an invitation to West’s lawyer in New York. McKinney said, “There was maybe about a month of lag, and then on a Thursday afternoon, we get a phone call from Kanye’s … manager, who said, ‘He’s going to be here on Sunday. He has a concert in Boston. You have two hours.’ And he came!”)In 2015, McKinney helped organize the School’s first Black in Design conference. The event hosted hundreds of designers, architects, and urban planners from across the country to showcase their work, share experiences, and discuss issues in the field. It was so successful that a second conference is planned for the fall.With her graduate work complete, McKinney moved to Los Angeles in March to work as an architectural designer for Frank Gehry, the Pritzker Prize-winning architect.After spying Gehry, GSD ’57, Ar.D. ’00, sitting alone during his visit last spring to receive the 2016 Harvard Arts Medal, McKinney struck up a conversation about architecture and community development. She left with his phone number and a request to call when she graduated. Although best known for splashy, undulating structures that disrupt the surrounding landscape, Gehry also has been credited with bringing about social change by jump-starting local economic and cultural revitalization efforts wherever he builds.For McKinney, leaving Harvard for this next chapter has been exhilarating — and emotional.“I feel like I’ve made an impact on the School and I think the School’s made an incredible impact on me, my worldviews … re-engaging me in things that I hadn’t really thought about in the past few years. Also, it’s given me much more of a voice,” she said, reflecting on her many leadership roles.“I’ve really come into my own and have been so incredibly thankful and fortunate to have had that experience.”last_img read more

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New mobile application by former Caribbean resident empowers citizens

first_img Tweet 9 Views   no discussions NewsRegional New mobile application by former Caribbean resident empowers citizens by: – September 22, 2011 Share Sharecenter_img Share Sharing is caring! Image via: columbiasc.netHOUSTON, USA – Sharon Hodge, sole proprietor of Trafalgar Solutions and former Caribbean resident, has announced the launch of a new smart phone application. The new application, titled iGot’em, will empower citizens and reduce crime and allow users to combat crime within their communities by uploading a recorded incident to the nearest law enforcement office. The application will notify law enforcement of the date, time, and location of the crime in progress. The combination of this information along with the general images taken by users will allow accurate reporting, while protecting the identity of the user.Hodge credits her creative spirit and her love for the Caribbean to iGot’em. Born in Dallas, Texas, and raised in the heart of South Central Los Angeles, she is no stranger to crime. “Where I grew up, crime was rampant, protection was light, and citizens were too afraid to come forward. This same behaviour exists in countries throughout the world,” said Hodge. Living in the Caribbean’s with her husband, remnant fears from her childhood brought an automatic sense of awareness and the will to fight for change. “By freeing citizens from the fear of retaliation, we might be able to catch some of our most violent offenders,” she said.Hodge is pleased to be expanding her role in the field of technology. She is inspired by Mark Zuckerburg’s (creator of Facebook) passion for change and, with her entrepreneurial frame of mind and success, she has a great future in the development and design of software.iGot’em is available for purchase through iTunes. Smart phone devices such as the Android and Blackberry will be added in the near future.Caribbean News Nowlast_img read more

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NFL teams huddling up to devise plans for social change

first_imgLast Updated: 30th August, 2020 07:54 IST NFL Teams Huddling Up To Devise Plans For Social Change Sam Darnold watched as several of his New York Jets teammates took turns speaking, many of whom got emotional. And, the quarterback did what he thought was his best play at that moment. He listened COMMENT SUBSCRIBE TO US Written By FOLLOW US LIVE TVcenter_img WATCH US LIVE Associated Press Television News First Published: 30th August, 2020 07:54 IST Sam Darnold watched as several of his New York Jets teammates took turns speaking, many of whom got emotional. And, the quarterback did what he thought was his best play at that moment. He listened.“I took the time to understand it is different growing up Black in America,” Darnold said Saturday. “And I now understand that better.”Darnold recalled how his parents always harped on him returning home before dark in Southern California so he didn’t get lost. He heard another not-so-sugarcoated side of that same curfew rule from his teammates.“They were told, ‘Hey, make sure you’re home before dark or else something bad can happen,’” Darnold said. “That’s a different conversation than what my parents had with me.”The Jets were one of nine NFL teams that canceled practice Thursday in wake of the police shooting of Jacob Blake, a Black man, in Wisconsin last Sunday. Instead of taking the field, the entire team spent more than four hours talking about racial injustice and social issues.The conversations — which included team president and CEO Christopher Johnson, general manager Joe Douglas and coach Adam Gase — were led by players detailing their experiences with racism, inequality and police brutality. They continued their discussions Friday, an off day, to begin devising plans to effect change among each other and in the community.“One of the guys in the room was like, ‘In order for us to help, we have to realize that this is a snowball and not an avalanche,’” said offensive lineman Jonotthan Harrison, who is Black. “We can’t just jump off the deep end and be like, attack this and do this and do this. No, we have to be very methodical and we have to approach it the right way, the safest way.”Many teams around the league have had similar conversations — with topics ranging from equal rights to making sure players are registered to vote — in the days since Blake, 29, was left paralyzed after being shot in the back by a police officer.The Seattle Seahawks canceled their scheduled practice Saturday after a lengthy team meeting. Coach Pete Carroll spoke to reporters later in the day for more than 14 minutes, without taking questions.“Our players are screaming at us: ‘Can you feel me? Can you see me? Can you hear me?’” said Carroll, who is white. “They just want to be respected. They just want to be accepted. Just like all of our white children and families and want to be. It’s no different because we’re all the same.“And there’s a lot of people that don’t see it that way, but there’s a lot of people that do.”Blake’s shooting was captured on cellphone video and ignited new protests in the U.S. three months after the death of George Floyd under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer touched off a nationwide reckoning over racial injustice — and discussions among NFL players and staffs about equality.“A lot of our players, a lot of our Black players, are hurting from the standpoint of this is close to home for many of them,” said Philadelphia Eagles coach Doug Pederson, who is white. “So for me, it’s about understanding, it’s about learning, it’s about gaining knowledge, and then being able to support our guys.”Bengals players, coaches, ownership and staff marched together in Cincinnati from Paul Brown Stadium to the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center on Saturday.“Together, as a unified front, we must identify, address and ultimately end those practices and policies that would deny liberty and justice to all, regardless of race, religion, or creed,” the Bengals said in a statement. “It is time for us all to take a stand! It is each of our responsibility to effect change in our communities, not only for us but for those yet to come.“We cannot turn a blind eye to the racism still experienced in this country.”On Friday night at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh, Steelers coach Mike Tomlin — flanked by team president Art Rooney II and general manager Kevin Colbert — briefly spoke on social unrest and prejudice while players locked arms behind him.Tomlin, one of three Black NFL head coaches, is the third-longest tenured coach in the league. Players and staff followed Tomlin’s speech by kneeling in prayer around the 50-yard line.“We decided to come together, lock arms and make a stand to show compassion,” linebacker Vince Williams said Saturday. “Even though we’re professional athletes, we’re still sympathetic to everything going on.”Darnold said he and his Jets teammates have not talked about sitting out any games as a form of protest, something that has happened the past several days in other sports such as the NBA, WNBA, NHL, MLS and Major League Baseball.“We have to continue playing because, quite frankly, this is the reason we have a platform, is because we play football and we are in the NFL,” Darnold said. “And that was a huge point to all the guys was, we have to continue playing, we have to continue to push our message across and get our points across to everyone because if we stop playing then that platform can be taken away from us.”Green Bay Packers center Corey Linsley, who is white, said it was eye-opening to listen to some of his teammates’ experiences — particularly offensive lineman Billy Turner and linebacker Christian Kirksey, both of whom are Black.“To hear their stories and especially know the place that they’re coming from, it’s impactful, man,” Linsley said Saturday. “It hits you different, for sure. It’s made an impact on me.”It’s made an impact on a number of guys in this locker room in the way that we view the world, the way that we view our criminal justice system, the way that we view society in general.”Image credits: AP last_img read more

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