Day: May 3, 2021

Physician- Ophthalmology, Cornea -133

first_imgWest Virginia University School of Medicine and the Department ofOphthalmology seeks a BC/BE Cornea/Refractive Specialist who has apassion for providing excellent patient care, educating futurephysicians, and moving medicine forward through research andcontinued program enhancement (ranks available: Assistant,Associate, or Full Professor). The expected candidate will beexpected to practice in Morgantown, WV.Duties: The successful candidate will practice in the areas ofCornea Ophthalmology. In addition to providing excellent patientcare, the successful candidate will also be actively involved inthe teaching of medical students, residents, and fellows.Opportunities exist to participate in clinical and translationalresearch.Qualifications: Applicants must have an MD, MD/PhD or DO degree orforeign equivalent and be eligible to obtain an unrestricted WestVirginia medical license. Candidates must be board certified/eligible in ophthalmology. For appointment at the AssociateProfessor or Professor rank, a demonstrated track-record ofleadership, excellent communication skills, and publications inhigh-impact journals are required. All qualifications must be metby the time of appointment.At the WVU Eye Institute you will treat a diverse population andhave exposure to clinically challenging cases. Our state-of-the artfacility houses all subspecialties of ophthalmology as well as anactive research program. This University-based practice is rapidlyexpanding with a vast patient population offering the opportunityto be busy quickly.WVU Medicine is West Virginia University’s affiliated healthsystem, West Virginia’s largest private employer, and a nationalleader in patient safety and quality. WVU Medicine includes thephysicians, specialists, and sub-specialists of the West VirginiaUniversity School of Medicine; four community hospitals; threecritical access hospitals; and a children’s hospital, all anchoredby a 645-bed academic medical center that offers tertiary andquaternary care. WVU Medicine has more than 1,000 active medicalstaff members and 15,000 employees who serve hundreds of thousandsof people each year from across the state of West Virginia and thenation. Morgantown is consistently rated as one of the best smallmetropolitan areas in the country for both lifestyle and businessclimate. The area offers the cultural diversity and amenities of alarge city in a safe, family-friendly environment. There is also anexcellent school system and an abundance of beautiful homes andrecreational activities.Build your legacy as you serve, teach, learn and make a differencefrom day one. To learn more, visit https://medicine.hsc.wvu.edu/and apply online at http://wvumedicine.org/morgantowncareers.For additional questions, please [email protected] Virginia University & University Health Associates are anAA/EO employer – Minority/Female/Disability/Veteran – and WVU isthe recipient of an NSF ADVANCE award for gender equity.Notes To Applicants Equal Opportunity Employer/Protected Veterans/Individuals withDisabilities.Please view Equal Employment Opportunity Posters provided byOFCCP here .The contractor will not discharge or in any other mannerdiscriminate against employees or applicants because they haveinquired about, discussed, or disclosed their own pay or the pay ofanother employee or applicant. However, employees who have accessto the compensation information of other employees or applicants asa part of their essential job functions cannot disclose the pay ofother employees or applicants to individuals who do not otherwisehave access to compensation information, unless the disclosure is(a) in response to a formal complaint or charge, (b) in furtheranceof an investigation, proceeding, hearing, or action, including aninvestigation conducted by the employer, or (c) consistent with thecontractor’s legal duty to furnish information. 41 CFR60-1.35(c)last_img read more

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Keble PemBroken

first_imgBefore the Blues game against Oxfordshire on Friday evening, it was the turn of the colleges to try 20/20 cricket as last year’s cuppers winners Pembroke defeated Keble by 7 wickets. Coloured clothing and music may have been the order of the day but Pembroke’s victory was largely thanks to a disciplined bowling and fielding performance. Having won the toss and elected to field Pembroke skipper Paul Ramsay led the way making a breakthrough with his third ball removing Booth for a single. When Chris Stearn nicked his next ball to Jonathon Fennell at slip, Keble were reeling at 3-2. They took time to recover with captain Rafe Roylands (23) and Ross Bland (14) putting on 31, but were unable to score quickly. Ramsay, who finished with figures of 4-1-10- 2, was ably supported by offspinner Adam Hunter (4-1-6-2). A rally from Stuart Drury (29) and Alan Bannister (22) boosted the Keble score to a competitive 116 with 31 runs coming from the last two overs. Keble required early wickets to put pressure on the Pembroke but had to wait until the eighth over when Dan Fox was caught superbly at backward point by Booth off the bowling of Stearn for 13. Any hope of a Keble fightback faded with Laurence Parker-Brown (39) and Nick Warrillow (22) adding 44 runs for the second wicket in just 6 overs effectively ended any Keble resistance. Warrilow fell in the 14th over, attempting to repeat a huge six off Roylands getting stumped by Tim Oliver in the process, the same bowler finding the edge to remove Parker-Brown two overs later. Fennell and Tom Bullock required just 3 overs to score the remaining 23 runs, with Fennell squrting the winning run to third man with on over to spare.ARCHIVE: 6th week TT 2004last_img read more

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Bishops to inspect Wycliffe

first_imgTROUBLED PPH Wycliffe Hall has come under further pressure after the Church of England announced this week that it had brought forward a scheduled inspection earlier than planned.The Bishops’ Committee for Ministry is to carry out its inspection next October, three months before the original date of January 2009.Wycliffe Hall’s Principal, Dr Richard Turnbull, denied suggestions that the inspection had been brought forward because of concerns about recent events at the Permanent Private Hall.He claimed that the earlier date of inspection “allows the normal inspection of Wycliffe at the beginning of a wider inspection of the Anglican theological institutions in Oxford”. He added, “There is no urgent or rapid inspection since there is no need for such.”Inspections at the Hall, a leading centre for evangelical training, normally occur every five years.The PPH, which can present students with Oxford degrees in the same manner as colleges, has become mired in controversy surrounding its leadership. Earlier this year, three former Principals called for the resignation of current Principal Richard Turnbull. In September, a University panel concluded that Oxford’s seven PPHs were at risk of not providing a broad liberal education. Referring to Wycliffe, the report raised concerns that it did not offer an “an Oxford experience in its essentials” and was not “a suitable educational environment for the full intellectual development of young undergraduates”. It recommended that school-leavers be barred from going to Wycliffe to study for their undergraduate degrees. Last month Council member Clare MacInnes resigned, and five other staff members have also left in the last year.Louis Henderson, a spokesperson for the Church of England’s Communication Office, said that it was unlikely Wycliffe Hall would lose recognition from the Church, which would advise on management and how to rectify any weaknesses. Henderson said, “If an institution is failing so seriously, appearing unable or unwilling to rectify the faults identified by the inspection, the Bishops’ Committee’s ultimate sanction is to recommend the House of Bishops, to which it reports, to withdraw recognition of the institution for training for ordination. This, I might add, is almost inconceivable, and certainly has never happened in my time.”By Mohsin Khanlast_img read more

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Not fine by me

first_imgElsewhere, the money goes towards bursary funds. Peter Mitchell, St. Hugh’s Dean, explained that, “All decanal fines at St Hugh’s are directed into the funds available to the College for student hardship cases.”Despite this justification, one St Hugh’s student who was fined £150 for mess and £150 for an accidentally smashed window said, “I would have rather done community service than paid a fine, because £300 for me affected me more substantially than it would have done someone in a more stable financial position.’‘My money went to a hardship fund but now I’m £300 out of pocket I’m suffering hardship.”He added, “The college tries to make it seem like an official procedure, but it seemed to me that similar offences produce varying punishments.”Similar confusion about what consequences to expect for a single offence is also evident at other colleges.A spokesperson for Worcester said that decanal responses ranged from, “requests to send letters of apology, cost of repairing damage, fines, community service and requirement to improve academic standards”.Few colleges said that they had a standardised system of punishments for specific misdemeanours, although some, such as Brasenose, make exact figures available. BNC’s Student Handbook details the penalties their students should expect should they break the rules. For example “kindling of naked flames” carries a fine of £100.Even when outlined, college decanal systems are often inconsistent with one another. While Brasenose students can expect a £100 fine for climbing on college buildings, at Jesus in the academic year 2009-10, a student was left £150 poorer for the same offence.Nick Seaford, a St John’s student, was fined £50 for tampering with a fire alarm, whereas St. Catz records a punishment of “1 hour community service, suspended, for removing battery from room’s fire-alarm”. In another incident, a St Anne’s student only received a £30 suspended fine for “setting off the fire alarm by cooking in my room”.Seaford, a first year, said he thought it was “reasonable” for colleges to respond to incidents in different ways. He said, “I think it’s fair enough … it depends on the atmosphere and the ethos of the college”.This is true of Mansfield, whose “progressive, informal environment” and “relatively small student body” makes punitive action a last resort. Dr Eleftheriadis, Mansfield’s Dean, said, “When things get very wrong, which is very rare, a fine will be the appropriate response.’‘But I have found that our students are always reasonable. I have very rarely been called to intervene.”He added, “There is no ‘community service’ or other ‘forced labour’ form of punishment, nor indeed any form of coercion. I try to resolve issues through discussion with the parties involved and by encouraging those involved to apologise or otherwise make up for their mistakes.” [mm-hide-text]%%IMG_ORIGINAL%%3318%%[/mm-hide-text]Graphics: Nick Taylor An investigation by Cherwell has uncovered vast discrepancies between decanal punishments at different colleges.Fines levied for offences in recent years range from an average of £62 per year at St Catz to a colossal £2,447 at St Edmund Hall.The figures from the sample of colleges which replied to Cherwell’s Freedom of Information request suggest that cumulatively, undergraduate colleges across the University are likely to collect around £30,000 in fines over the current academic year.By far the largest proportion of punishments relate to behavioural offences and setting off fire alarms.University College’s records showed some particularly unexpected misdemeanours, such as a student who was punished in 2006 for having a bale of hay in their room.The fine imposed was “£20 plus £58.07 for cleaning”. Elsewhere, a student received a warning for keeping “chickens in student accommodation”.Fines for ICT misconduct are particularly steep, with Univ fining up to £200 a time for “the use of P2P software on the University network”, and charges related to file sharing accounting for 27% of the total amount raised in fines by Jesus since 2008.Univ also gave out three warnings to different students for “improper comments” on the Facebook group, “Univ Incoming Class 2010”.Illicit room parties also often result in a depleted bank balance or even an educational course. In February 2009, an “illegal party, excessive noise and smoking” resulted in one student from Univ being instructed to attend a “seminar with fire safety officer” and do “community service in the form of five sessions cleaning up the area around the recycling and rubbish bins outside the kitchen/works department.” The student in question was told, “Specifically, you will next week report to the Hall Manager in time to obtain rubber gloves and aprons and begin cleaning at 8am. You will absolve this task for 5 days (Monday to Friday inclusive).”Students looking forward to the tradition of “trashing” following exams this summer should also beware of severe penalties. Records showed that this can carry heavy fines, with some colleges regularly imposing £200 charges on students who flout the rules.In an apparently unique case, one St Anne’s student reported receiving a warning from the Dean for “having really loud sex and trashing my room”.Teddy Hall, the highest-grossing college of those surveyed admitted, “punishments are generally in the form of fines.”The current Teddy Hall Dean, Professor Robert Whittaker, commented that, “The level of the figures may perhaps reflect inclusion of reparation costs alongside fines in the strict sense.”He said, “Fines (in the broad sense, i.e. charges) go towards the costs incurred as a result of the action that resulted in the fine (e.g. replacing damaged fittings) and otherwise towards welfare.“Welfare and disciplinary provision and issues are interrelated, and as Dean I am keen to reflect on issues that arise and to work with the JCR and MCR to find ways to avoid repetition of problems and to ensure a responsive welfare system within the college.” ‘A student received a warning from the Dean for loud sex’ ‘Illicit room parties and excessive noise often result in fines’ Mary Kerr, Bursar of St. Hugh’s, which has been criticised in the past for its hefty financial penalties, told Cherwell, “We do not impose community service or other similar forms of punishment”.At other colleges however, a policy of community service is popular. St Hilda’s said of their decanal system, “There is a community service element in place which is always preferable to monetary fines.”Figures for St Catz show an average of 46 hours of community service a year given out as punishment since 2005. In a single year, 2005-06, 121 hours were doled out.As a result, income from fines are low, although the Home Bursar notes that, “Administrative charges (connected with car-parking without permit, computer network misuse, damage to property) are not recorded, unless punitive.”Offences at Catz include “misuse” of the car park, warranting 20 hours of community service, and “pranking another student”, which earned the culprit temporary exclusion from the bar.Other incidents brought harsher consequences; in 2007, two students were caught “throwing eggs in residence” and, as repeat offenders, were given “10 hours community service, barred from Entz [and] denied privilege of choosing a room in the following year”.Some students have said they would rather their college adopted a similar system of community service. One first year, who was fined for misbehaviour at another college and for mess, commented, “The financial punishments are unfair and extreme.’‘I asked to do community service or another form of punishment but this wasn’t allowed. There was no other option than to pay the £100 fine each time.”But some see fines as beneficial. Clifford Webb, Merton’s Finance Bursar, emphasised that money raised from student punishments was put to use. He said, “The College retains the income from fines that are imposed in respect to damage to College property.“All other fines, including fines of a purely disciplinary nature, are made available to the undergraduate common room and may be paid to charities nominated by them.”last_img read more

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Four in ten state school teachers rarely or never recommend Oxbridge

first_imgThe Sutton Trust report accompanying the survey data emphasised that “those from more advantaged educational backgrounds are more likely to receive higher quality support and to be able to draw on more relevant forms of social and cultural capital”.The proportion of state secondary teachers unwilling to recommend Oxbridge to their students has not changed since 2007 when the same survey was conducted, while the proportion of successful state applicants has risen steadily in the same period from 47 per cent to 55.6 per cent.Eden Bailey, OUSU Vice President for Access and Academic Aff airs, said, “There are some problems which are specifi c to Oxford, but it is often the case that teachers’ preconceptions of Oxford are (mis) informed by experiences many years ago, and by second-hand received ‘knowledge’. Further to this, there is little outside recognition of how exceptionally proactive Oxford’s student body is in providing and improving services that students need in response to issues faced here.“Above all, it is important that prospective students are in control of their application – not their teachers, parents, or anyone else. Although concerns may stem from good intentions, it is a serious problem when teachers preclude students from educational opportunities without giving students themselves to explore them and make their own minds up.” she said.Dr Samina Khan, Director of Undergraduate Admissions and Outreach at Oxford, said, “Our outreach activities and commitment in reaching out to teachers prioritises those most in need of support, and includes a newly launched Sutton Trust summer school for teachers from state schools.“We are increasingly reaching out to teachers of younger pupils to help them understand how best to support talented students from early on. At the moment we work with about 2750 state schools every year to address misconceptions about Oxford.”In its report, the Sutton Trust drew attention to its own work with state school students. “The Sutton Trust has run Teacher Summer Schools at Oxford and Cambridge this year, free courses that aim to dispel common myths about Oxbridge and other leading universities and to provide support to state school teachers to help bright students to apply,” it said. Over 40 per cent of state secondary school teachers rarely or never advise their academically gifted students to apply to Oxford or Cambridge, according to a survey released yesterday by the Sutton Trust. The survey, of a nationally representative 1,607 teachers, also found common perceptions of the proportion of state-educated students Oxbridge, despite increases in state school numbers in recent years.Only 21 per cent of state secondary teachers said they always advised their bright students to appl. When asked to guess the proportion of state-educated students at Oxbridge, just one in a hundred overestimated it.Sir Peter Lampl, Chairman of the Sutton Trust, said, “Today’s polling tells us that many state school teachers don’t see Oxbridge as a realistic goal for their brightest pupils. The reasons are they don’t think they will get in and if they get in they don’t think they will fit in.”Sir Lampl’s comments are supported by the data, which suggest that a fi fth of teachers who don’t encourage bright students to apply do so because they feel applications will be unsuccessful, and 13 per cent because they expect students to be unhappy there. Sixty per cent say they never advise on university choice.James Brackin, a second-year Magdalen student who went to Worthing Sixth Form College, said, “The teachers at my college were very keen to encourage us to apply to Oxbridge – they ran a scheme called Aspire that was aimed at getting more academically gifted students (with 5 As at GCSE) into competitive universities. We were each given an UCAS adviser to help us with the application, and my Physics teacher (I was applying for Physics and Philosophy at Oxford at the time) spent two lunchtimes a week helping me prepare for the Physics Aptitude Test.“The programme included trips to the Oxford and Cambridge Student Conference at Epsom Downs, as well as to the Oxford September Open Day.”last_img read more

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Exeter College’s Cohen Quad formally opened

first_imgExeter College has officially opened the newly built Cohen Quad on its Walton Street site. It was due to open in August, but delays meant that 86 students were forced to move into hotel accommodation for the duration of Michaelmas.Designed by architect Alison Brooks, there are 90 student bedrooms, a lecture theatre and a café, as well as teaching and archive space. The college purchased the site in 2010 from Ruskin College, with the redevelopment made possible by eighteen million pounds worth of donations.The building has been named after the parents of lead donor and alumnus Sir Ronald Cohen, who graduated with a PPE degree from Exeter College in 1964. Sir Ronald said: “It is at Exeter College that I really learned to think. Education is the one possession that cannot be taken away and I am lucky that I can help future generations of Exeter College students to live in a collegiate environment where their minds are best nurtured and inspired.  The stunning design by Alison Brooks will greatly enhance our College’s life.”Isabella Neil, a third year English student, said: “It is less obvious how great an impact the new building will have on students’ everyday lives. The extra living space that Cohen Quad offers means an end to Exeter students desperately scrambling to find private housing that is ‘adequate’. We now have the option to avoid 52-week rents, hefty deposits and administration fees, and potentially difficult landlords.”Exeter College said in a statement released on their website that Cohen Quad “Will have a significant impact on encouraging students to apply to Exeter College and the University of Oxford. It will help to alleviate pressure on Oxford’s private housing market and will provide students with pristine and affordable accommodation designed around the needs of modern students, including 30-week rather than 52-week lets. Cohen Quad therefore makes an Oxford education both more affordable and more enjoyable.”last_img read more

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Trinity’s Welfare Turmoil

first_imgLast term, as reported by Cherwell, an email on behalf of Trinity’s JCR President wasaccidentally leaked, revealing sensitive information about welfare to the JCR. The survey also found issues with the JCR’s welfarepositions, namely Peer Supporters and Welfare Reps. It stated: “The mainbarrier to improving the approachability of the JCR Welfare Representatives andPeer Supporters was that as these roles are filled by current students… inturn, JCR members may feel this is a less confidential means for support, dueto its greater informality, particularly if you know the peer supporterssocially.” A section on sexual harassment asked respondents whetherthey thought there was a clear way of reporting harassment issues in college.Only 8.8% of those who answered gave a response of “yes”, with 34.1% answering“no”. Asked whether they would feel comfortable doing so, only 10% of peopleanswered “yes”. A spokesperson for the College told Cherwell: “Ensuring Trinity’s welfare provision is as effective aspossible is an important priority for Trinity – the JCR welfare survey raisedimportant concerns around provision, which we are committed to addressing in apositive and decisive way. These proposals include a revising of the College safeguarding policy to clarify the route through which students can be referred to outside agencies, a College policy on sharing information to solve confidentiality issues, consideration of the provision of Mental Health First Aid training for key personnel, and a regular review of the College Harassment policy. The results of the survey were also shared with the Dean and Welfare Dean. One section of the survey asked respondents whether theyagreed or disagreed with the statement: “Trinity is a place that cares aboutits students’ welfare.” The results concluded: “Out of the 93 responses, 30students either disagreed or slightly disagreed, with a further 13 having noclear opinion on the matter, suggesting that nearly half of all JCR members donot feel that Trinity is a college that strongly cares about its students’welfare. This is particularly striking given that only 16 students fully agreedwith the statement.” Another student was reported to have “expressed confusion about the way [College President Dame Hilary Boulding] and Anil (then the Equalities Fellow) were surprised by the findings of the report, given that from their experience, a multitude of issues have been reported over the past year. This suggests a major issue with lack of transparency of where information goes from the initial point of contact.” The results of the survey prompted a series of proposedsolutions, both in terms of JCR and College welfare. The JCR’s action to betaken included urging College to recognise “the extremely low levels ofconfidence students generally have in approaching college staff members aboutmental health issues” and creating a Google Form to allow JCR members to submitanonymous complaints or concerns about specific Peer Supporters, whilst alsocreating a more thorough screening process for candidates who wish to becomePeer Supporters. However, it was also emphasised that the lack of an“approachable system” provided by College put a “huge strain” on the JCRwelfare team who were not qualified mental health professionals and are“limited in both training and power.” In response to the reportedly “shocking” statistics on thehandling of sexual harassment, the JCR has urged the College to create theposition of at least one “Harassment Officer/Women’s Officer” among the Fellowsthat was separate from both the Dean and the Welfare Dean. The JCR also statedtheir intention to “make both Trinity’s stance on and processes of managingclaims of sexual harassment clearer to all students” and to “formally increasethe number of sexual harassment responders in Trinity.” An emergency JCR meeting called just days after the surveywas published led to the College launching an independent review into theirwelfare provision. A new member of the welfare team was also appointed to helpimprove the college’s welfare capacity to deal with welfare concerns. The JCR Secretary responded by telling attendees that shehad been “encouraged” by the meeting with the College President, and statedthat “she does seem to really recognise the issue” but has to be “pragmatic”when carrying out changes. The minutes of the meeting record how: “[the JCR Secretary]emphasised how JCR members can share their concerns about either the temporarymeasure or the longer-term review of the welfare system with the Exec Committeeand the Welfare Reps, who will respect confidentiality. The minutes record the response of the JCR President: “Thisis also a really important issue that needs to be recognised and should not be overshadowedby the other findings of this report. He stated that the new Equalities FellowMaria is extremely willing to deal with these problems and promote a moreinclusive community.” Another question asked “If you have approached a collegestaff member about a mental health issue, how satisfied were you with the waythe issue was dealt with?”. In response to this, 9 out of 31 students said thatthey would rate their satisfaction as a 1. On the other hand, none of the 19students who responded rated their encounter with JCR welfare representativepeer supporters as a one. Trinity JCR, the Trinity Welfare Dean, and the college’sPresident were contacted for comment. In light of the review, a new member of the welfare team hasbeen appointed. In an email from last week, the President said: “Please notethat we have slightly different welfare arrangements in place for this term. Inorder to create some additional Welfare capacity, we are pleased to welcomeMark Bezerra Speeks who will be available to students on Mondays and Fridays.” “It is our goal with this review to get underneath thegeneral impressions of welfare at Trinity and understand specific instanceswhere support was needed and how the college responded. These will be used todevelop appropriate responses to the issues raised. “We are grateful to students for working with us and hope tocontinue working positively and constructively to ensure our welfare provisionis robust in serving all students who need support.” The minutes of the emergency meeting state that TrinityCollege “seemed to take the findings very seriously” and confirmed that variousplans which were presented to the Governing Body. When asked “How confident would you feel approaching acollege staff member about a mental health issue?” half of students said theywere not confident, rating the college either one or two on a scale of one tofive. Only three students gave a rating of five. In contrast, for confidence inapproaching a JCR peer supporter about a mental health issues the averageresponse was a 3.2. The College President later announced, in an email on 28thFebruary, the Governing Body’s intention to conduct an “independent welfarereview” of Trinity’s welfare provision, which will be carried out this term.Deputy Head of the University Counselling Services Maureen Freed was announcedto be conducting the review, which was to start at the beginning of Trinityterm. On 29th January 2019 an Emergency JCR Meeting was called in which the results of the survey were discussed, having been sent out to JCR members via email. The survey was a volunteer sample of 93 members of the JCR. It was made clear that because of this: “the figures should not be taken to be a completely accurate representation of the JCR at large, however they shall give an indication of general feeling on certain key issues.” “As a next step, the College has engaged the Deputy Head ofCounselling at the University to conduct an independent review of welfare atTrinity; she is an experienced organisational consultant who has worked with othercolleges on similar reviews. “It was also emphasised how this temporary measure is by nomeans all that is being done to reform the Trinity welfare system – and thereview will help to usher in further changes for the new academic year.” The email stated: “out of 12 people identifying asBlack/African/Caribbean/BlackBritish (4) and Mixed/Multi-Ethnic (8) (somepeople however also said prefer not to say) 9 people said in the survey thatthey “faced any specific issues or incidents” at Trinity with regards ofrace/ethnicity and 5 people said that worries/issues about race have adetrimental effect on their mental health.” Serious concerns have been expressed by Trinity studentsabout the performance of the College’s welfare provisions in Michaelmas,according to survey results obtained by Cherwell.last_img read more

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IS IT TRUE AUGUST 29 See what capital…

first_imgCONNECTTWEETLINKEDINCOMMENTEMAILMOREEVANSVILLE, Ind. — Funding for Mesker Park Zoo, blight elimination, affordable housing, road repairs and 20 new police cars are at the forefront of the 2019 city budget.The proposed budget made its official appearance Monday afternoon.Mayor Lloyd Winnecke presented his budget recommendations to the City Council finance committee Monday. The total proposed budget is $395.2 million — an increase of more than 15 percent from 2018.“The proposed budget, even though it is a balanced budget, does account for a two percent pay raise for employees,” he said.The highest proposed expenditures fall into three categories: sewer (29 percent), public safety (20 percent) and water (17 percent). Nearly 11 percent of this year’s budget increase is attributed to water and sewer utility expenses, Winnecke said.The city expects to pull in $402.5 million in revenue from taxes and various streams. Property tax and utility rates (water and sewer) are prominent revenue streams, according to city administration. The increase in revenue is 8 percent higher than in 2018. The new Public Safety Local Income Tax is expected to bring in $4.4 million in new revenue next year, Winnecke confirmed.He emphasized the importance of investing in the city’s transportation infrastructure, continuing the Land Bank blight elimination program, investing in Affordable Housing projects, providing public safety with new tools and protecting Mesker Park Zoo and Botanic Garden’s accreditation status and the continuation of new exhibits or attractions there.“We are requesting that they fund the Affordable Housing Trust fund with $500,000,” he said. “We think this is a really critical request. I can tell you that there is some really dynamic affordable housing initiatives that will be rolled out in the broader community in the coming weeks.”Finance Chair Jonathan Weaver said the Mesker Park Zoo additions will be great for the City of Evansville. He is also excited for the affordable housing projects and public safety upgrades.“It would be nice if more money was donated to the zoo, and this is probably a good example of why it should be privatized,” he said. “People don’t realize it costs $5 million to run the zoo, and that’s just the bare bones of it.”Excluded in the 2019 budget is: Lloyd Pool replacement and upgrades to Mesker Park Amphitheatre and Roberts Park. Although replacing Lloyd Pool is not in the 2019 budget, Winnecke said he would announce an alternative plan to replace Lloyd Pool soon.Council members are excited about the proposed capital projects but question why a year-to-date expense column for 2018 wasn’t provided by the administration in the 2019 budget proposal book.Ward 2 Councilwoman Missy Mosby said the year-to-date column is usually present on annual proposal budgets.“We’ve always received that,” she said. “How can we look at a budget and actually do our jobs when we’re not given all the information that we need. I have a lot of concerns about overtime. I want to look and see what department heads are spending year to date on overtime.”Winnecke addressed Council members’ concerns regarding year-to-date updates Monday. He said the year-to-date column was left out because it’s not a part of the automatic operating system, and the administration was pushing to meet the Aug. 17 budget deadline.Although Mosby has a few concerns, she is excited to see budget projections, stating, “there’s a lot of things I want for our city, but we have to make sure we can afford them.”Winnecke said the 2019 budget is a collaborative effort among city administration and the Council.“We don’t expect that we will agree with City Council on everything we propose, and I don’t expect I will agree with everything they’d like to counter with,” he said. “We do understand that our citizens expect local government to run smoothly, and we need a good budget to be passed.”Budget hearings will continue at 3:30 p.m. for the remainder of the week at the Civic Center, 1 N.W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. The final budget vote is scheduled for Oct. 8.Proposed Capital Projects$500,000 – Investment in the Affordable Housing Trust Fund$460,000 – Humboldt Penguin exhibit at Mesker Park Zoo and Botanic Garde$403,000 – 20 Evansville Police Department vehicles and safety vests$940,000 – purchase/replacement of 5 METS Transit Busses$570,000 – Engine 1 fire truck replacement $444,000 – Final phase of Central dispatch radio/console communications system upgrade$4.9 million – Street resurfacing /drainage and new road projects$180,000 – Purchase of new snow removal truck$1.7 million – Blight elimination and trash /debris removal $34 million – West Waste Water Plan expansion$29 million – Westside 6 million-gallon storage equalization basin (sewer)$29 million – Effluent pump station (sewer) at Kids Kingdom Playground site$28 million – 15-mile waterline  replacement $4.3 million- Waterworks Road relocation  $20,000  – 7 new emergency sirens  See what capital projects are proposed for 2019 in Evansville city budgetBuy Photo(Photo: Zach Evans / Courier & Press)center_img Evansville Courier & PressPublished 5:57 p.m. CT Aug. 27, 2018 FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Vanderburgh County Commissioners to Present “The State of Our County”

first_img Vanderburgh County Commissioners Bruce Ungethiem, Cheryl Musgrave and Ben Shoulders will present the annual “State of Our County” speech followed by a question and answer session at the Evansville Rotary Club’s weekly luncheon Tuesday April 10. The Commissioners will present updates on a variety of topics on county departments, infrastructure and economic development. Lunch begins at 11:30 a.m. followed by the presentation at noon in the Walnut Room of the Tropicana Executive Conference Center, located at 421 NW Riverside Drive in downtown Evansville.The public and members of the media are invited to attend. Those who would like to attend that arFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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STUDY SHOWS CHILDREN IN THE TRI-STATE ARE MORE LIKELY TO FACE HUNGER THAN…

first_imgChild Food Insecurity Rates In Tri-State Food Bank’s Service Area Are Higher Than Overall Food Insecurity Rates Tri-State Food Bank announced the release of Map the Meal Gap 2019, the latest report by Feeding America® on food insecurity and the cost of food at both the county and congressional district level. It is the only study that provides food insecurity data at the local level.  Map the Meal Gap 2019 reveals that food insecurity exists in every county in Tri-State Food Bank’s service area. It also shows that children are more likely to be food insecure, with the child food insecurity rate at 17.7% compared to 13% for the overall population in the 33 counties in IL, IN, & KY of which Tri-State Food Bank serves.“There isn’t a single state or county in America free from child hunger, and it is within our collective power to change that and ensure that today’s children are tomorrow’s leaders,” said Claire Babineaux-Fontenot, chief executive officer of Feeding America. “The Feeding America nationwide network of food banks is investing in our nation’s future by helping to provide over 146 million meals to children every year. Still, Map the Meal Gap highlights that more must be done. Together food banks, corporations, policymakers, donors, volunteers and advocates can solve hunger.” “I encourage everyone to visit the website, map.feedingamerica.org to find out what hunger looks like in their community and get involved to be part of the solution,” Babineaux-Fontenot continued. “One way is to tell Congress to invest in kids during Child Nutrition Reauthorization legislation and increase access to food for kids during the summer. Your voice matters and we can make a difference.”Overall food insecurity in the Tri-State varies throughout the counties Tri-State Food Bank serves in Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky. Food insecurity rates in Illinois ranges from a low of 11% of the population in Edwards County up to 23% in Alexander County. The food insecurity rates in Indiana range from a low of 10% of the population in Dubois County up to 16% in Vanderburgh County. And food insecurity rates in Kentucky ranges from a low of 13% of the population in Livingston County up to 19% in Union County. Tri-State Food Bank Executive Director Glenn Roberts states, “It is positive news that, from 2016 to 2017, national and local food insecurity rates have dropped, and here in the Tri-State they decreased from 13.4% to 13.0% overall, and from 18.3% to 17.7% for children. Improved economic conditions mean that fewer people are living on the edge. However, 1 in 7 adults and 1 in 6 children still do not always know where their next meal is coming from, and this is unacceptable. And what hasn’t changed is the fervency of our work at Tri-State Food Bank because hunger continues to be a serious problem in this country, especially for our most vulnerable populations – our children, senior citizens, and those living in rural communities. Tri-State Food Bank is passionately committed to fill the gaps where hunger exists, and we invite the community to get involved in our mission by volunteering and/or making food or monetary donations.”Tri-State Food Bank is a member of Feeding America’s hunger-relief network comprised of 200 food banks and 60,000 food pantries and meal programs that together provides food assistance to more than 40 million people in the U.S. struggling with hunger.  Looking back at our work from 2018, Tri-State Food Bank distributed approximately 8.6M pounds of food (7.2M meals) through its 248 partner agencies and schools of which help carry out Kid’s Weekend BackPack food programs, Senior Meal programs, summer feeding sites, soup kitchens, and food pantries. During this time, we were able to serve over 110,000 unique individuals in the Tri-State through a 10% increase in distributions over 2017. Map the Meal Gap 2019 uses data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and food price data and analysis provided by Nielsen, a global provider of information and insights. The study is supported by The Howard G. Buffett Foundation, Conagra Brands Foundation and Nielsen. Key local findings:Child Food Insecurity in the Tri-State is nearly 1% higher than the national average (17.7% locally compared to 17% nationally)Overall Food Insecurity in the Tri-State is 0.5% higher than the national average (13% locally compared to 12.5% nationally)There are 34,990 Food Insecure Children in the Tri-StateThe study’s findings underscore the extent of need that remains in communities in the Tri-State area and across the U.S., despite national measures from the USDA that indicate overall improvement.Dr. Craig Gundersen, Professor of Agricultural and Consumer Economics at the University of Illinois, Executive Director of the National Soybean Research Laboratory and a member of Feeding America’s Technical Advisory Group is the lead researcher of Map the Meal Gap 2019. This is the ninth consecutive year that Feeding America has conducted the Map the Meal Gap study. The Map the Meal Gap 2019 interactive map allows policymakers, state agencies, corporate partners, food banks and advocates to develop integrated strategies to fight hunger on a community level.A summary of the findings, an interactive map of the United States, and the full report are available at map.feedingamerica.org. Join the conversation about Map the Meal Gap 2019 on Twitter using #MealGap.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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