Category: cdyynqebjjon

A suggested model for the IRI plasmapheric distribution

first_imgA model has been constructed which grafts IRI topside profiles to field-aligned diffusive equilibrium profiles at a “reference level” near 650 km altitude. For different values of geographic latitude, longitude, sunspot number, season and time, the properties of the plasma distribution in the equatorial plane are investigated. These are compared with observations made by satellite (particularly GEOS and ISEE) and also with deductions made from whistler observations.last_img

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Personal Water Craft Accident in the Bay Sends 4 to the Hospital

first_imgOcean City Fire Department At approximately 12:54 hours on Sunday, August 14th, 2016, Ocean City Fire Department was dispatched to a personal water craft accident in the back bay between 34th St Bridge and Corson’s Inlet.A deputy chief, engine company, ambulance and water rescue unit initially responded. The fire department units staged at the bay access under the 34th street Bridge.The two personal water crafts appear to have collided in between the old train bridge and the Intercoastal Waterway south of the 34th Street Bridge.One of the crafts with two riders was able to make it to the access under its own power with damage to its hull.  The two riders on the second craft were removed from the water by a passing boater and were brought to the access area.Three of the patients were treated and transported by ambulance to Shore Medical Center. The fourth patient was transported by helicopter to Atlantic City Medical Center – Trauma Division for treatment.Other agencies involved in the incident included US Coast Guard, State and Local Police Marine Units, Atlanticare Paramedics, Atlanticare Medivac helicopter, & OCBP.No additional details are known at this time.last_img read more

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Independent report: Priority groups for coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccination: advice from the JCVI, 30 December 2020

first_imgThis advice is provided to facilitate the development of policy on COVID-19 vaccination in the UK.last_img

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Watch Nikki Glaspie Crush Vocals On “Killing In The Name” With Galactic On Jam Cruise

first_imgJam Cruise is packed with one-of-a-kind collaborations, and fans certainly got more than they bargained for when drummer Nikki Glaspie took the stage with Galactic. Glaspie treated fans to lead vocals on the Rage Against The Machine track “Killing In The Name,” riling up the audience during this particularly political time. There was even a fake Hitler on stage, silently symbolizing the outrage most Americans are feeling.Watch a video of Glaspie with Galactic below, courtesy of Samantha Goodal.[Cover Photo by Keith Griner – Phierce Photo]last_img read more

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Baker/Kohler to head Saint Mary’s Student Government Association

first_imgSaint Mary’s College Student Government Association (SGA) announced the incoming student body president and vice president, Kaitlyn Baker and Maddie Kohler, on Friday.Election week was exciting and stressful, but Kohler felt particularly confident during her speech in the dining hall Wednesday during dinner, she said.“We were always anxious to see how the other candidates were going to campaign,” she said. “But Wednesday night, when we gave our speeches, I was so proud to be telling the students what we want to do, if elected, and express our love for the College.”Kohler said she and Baker plan to attend SGA meetings and shadow the College’s outgoing student body president and vice president, McKenna Schuster and Sam Moorhead, to prepare for their term, which officially begins April 1.Baker said she and Kohler will begin the board application process for student-run organizations like Student Diversity Board (SDB), Residence Hall Association (RHA) and Student Activities Board (SAB). Students were elected into such positions prior to this year, Baker said.Though they both have SGA experience, Kohler said she and Baker look forward to working with Schuster and Moorhead to guide them into their new positions.Kohler said she and her partner intend to add a function to the new BelleMobile app that would track Blinky, a nightly shuttle service sponsored by Saint Mary’s Security to transport students safely around Saint Mary’s campus, as well as back and forth from the Grotto.“There’s a lot of questions that need to be asked and a lot of research to figure out how we could create such a function,” Kohler said. “I’ll have to reach out to IT and try to develop that over the summer.”Baker said they want to begin promptly on some of their larger initiatives, such as the Blinky tracker and diversity within SGA.In addition, Baker said they want to talk with security about transporting students during the day.“The issue seems to be that girls come home with groceries and luggage, and they need a little help getting from point A to point B, so maybe we can talk with security about being more available during the day,” Baker said.Kohler said she wants students to know she and Baker are interested in their concerns.“We’ve already had students reaching out with ideas, and students feel like they can communicate their wants and needs to us,” Kohler said. “ I really want students to know we are approachable.”Baker said she and Kohler hope to recruit a diverse group of students to be in their presidential cabinet.“I want to make sure minority groups are represented and reach out to some of the diverse clubs to find out what their needs are,” she said. “I want to make sure their voices are heard.”SGA added an “International Chair” to ensure the needs of all students are met, and Baker said she thinks including SGA representatives within that addition may help.“We can’t really cater to the needs of diverse students if we don’t have any diversity in SGA,” Baker said.Baker said she also wants SGA to maintain its transparency while she and her partner are in office.“In our platform, we tried to be really honest and highlight ideas we know we could work towards,” she said. “We really want to hear from students and keep Senate meetings open to students to voice their concerns.”Baker and Kohler both said they are excited for the “Big Belle, Little Belle” Program to begin next fall. The program will pair up current sophomores and juniors with incoming first-year students and give new students a guide for their first year of college and beyond.“Right now, the program is voluntary and the Office of Student Affairs is in charge,” Baker said. “We hope students will want to share their Saint Mary’s experience with new students and serve as a mentor and friend.”Kohler said, overall, the elections were a good example of friendly competition amongst classmates.“All of the candidates did a great job campaigning and getting their message out there,” Kohler said. “Now I’m really excited to meet with [the] administration and communicate our ideas and figure out what plans are already in the making.”Tags: Kaitlyn Baker, Maddie Kohler, sga, sga electionslast_img read more

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Educating families

first_imgBy Sam Fahmy University of GeorgiaA father hugs his daughter after a long day of work. A motherwashes a load of clothes. A child plays dress up in mommy’s ordaddy’s work clothes.For migrant agricultural workers, these typical scenes of familylife can expose loved ones to dangerous pesticides brought infrom the fields. Even a single pesticide exposure can cause askin rash, nausea or vomiting.Chronic exposure can cause nervous system problems and certaincancers. In all cases, the dangers are especially great tochildren and infants.Simple precautionsTo help migrant workers protect themselves and their families,University of Georgia Cooperative Extension will begin abilingual outreach program that teaches migrant workers howsimple precautions and proper laundering techniques can reducethe health risks that stem from pesticide exposures.”We want them to see that if they take some very simple stepsthey can improve their children’s health and protect themselves,”said Sharon Gibson, the state coordinator for UGA’s Children,Youth, and Families at Risk (CYFAR) program and a member of theUGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences faculty.Beginning in September, FCS extension agents will place pamphletsin doctors’ offices, child care facilities, churches and stateaid offices that encourage workers to remove contaminated clothesand shoes before entering the home and to shake their clothesoutside to dislodge pesticides. The pamphlets, along with postersat laundromats and grocery stores, will encourage people to washwork clothes separately from other clothes and to pre-rinseclothes and use high water levels, hot water and detergent tominimize cross-contamination. One-on-one guidanceSpanish-speaking extension assistants will also provide in-homedemonstrations of pesticide reduction methods during routinevisits that also cover topics such as nutrition, money managementand safety.Karen Leonas, professor of textiles, merchandising and interiors,said that 97 percent of pesticide exposures come directly throughthe skin and that a single, acute exposure can be enough tosicken a child.”For children, even a little bit is a problem because their skinis more porous and more open,” Leonas said. “And children havelower body weights, so small amounts are going to impact themmore significantly than adults.”The idea for the program originated in 2005, after the directorof a rural health clinic spoke to Debbie Purvis, the ColquittCounty FCS extension agent, about the widespread andlong-standing problem of pesticide exposures in migrant workers andtheir families. Meeting a needPurvis relayed the community’s need to the university, whereGibson’s expertise in multicultural outreach was coupled withLeonas’ expertise in protective apparel. Gibson and Leonasenlisted the help of June Griffin’s technical writing class inthe UGA Franklin College of Arts and Sciences to create a servicelearning experience for students.”The students really understood the dangers that the children andfamilies faced with these pesticides and put in more time andenergy into what they produced than I’ve ever seen for anyproject for this class,” said Griffin, now at the University ofNebraska. “They really felt like what they were doing wasimportant, so they rose to that and got very involved.” The project, funded by a grant from the UGA Office of the VicePresident for Public Service and Outreach, will be piloted inheavily agricultural Colquitt, Candler, Houston, Sumter andToombs counties and then widened to other Georgia counties.”It’s really giving a new emphasis to something that we in thisarea have known is a concern for quite some time,” Purvis said.”By passing this information along to the families, we hope toprotect our children and make them safer.”last_img read more

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Tests confirm 5th BSE case in Canadian cow

first_imgApr 17, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – A 6-year-old dairy cow in British Columbia, Canada, has been confirmed as that country’s 5th case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Testing conducted at the National Centre for Foreign Animal Diseases in Winnipeg, Canada, showed the cow had BSE, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) announced yesterday. No part of the animal has entered the human food or animal feed chain, Canadian authorities said. The CFIA is investigating how the cow became infected, with special attention to feed practices early in the cow’s life. The cow was from a farm in Fraser Valley. She was identified through Canada’s nationwide BSE surveillance efforts. Four BSE cases have been found in Canada, the first one in May 2003, CIDRAP has reported previously. The last confirmed case was identified in Jan 2006 in a 6-year-old cow in northern Alberta. The first case led to a 2-year ban on shipments of live Canadian cattle into the United States. The US border was reopened in July 2005 to Canadian cattle younger than 30 months old. See also Because of government safeguards, the case does not affect the safety of Canadian beef, another CIDRAP story cited the CFIA as saying last week. Tissues where BSE is known to concentrate in infected animals are removed from all cattle slaughtered in Canada. In addition, cattle at increased risk are tested, and the use of cattle protein in cattle feed is banned. Apr 14 CIDRAP News storyhttp://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/other/bse/news/april1406bse.htmllast_img read more

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Space to work, rest and play

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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Historic ice cream factory set for cool makeover in urban revitalisation project

first_imgArtists render of Factory LaneWEST End could soon have two new laneways, a park and a water play area following the lodgement of a development application from Sekisui House. The developer lodged the application with Brisbane City Council for a major public space at the West Village project. Artists render of The Common Artist render of Wilson LaneMore from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus21 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market21 hours agoArtist render of The Common West Village project director Andrew Thompson said Sekisui House aimed to have the project open to the public by the end of 2018. The new works will include an open space known as The Common, two laneways called Factory Lane and Wilson Lane, and a dedicated community space. “These parkland and community spaces will create a point of difference for West Village by providing open green spaces in the inner-city for residents to enjoy,” he said.Mr Thompson said The Common would reinstate the historic forecourt of the 1920s Peters Ice Cream Factory.center_img A historic picture of the Peters Ice Cream Factory at West End.“The Common will be a cool, green entry statement that embraces the heritage-listed building,” he said. “The Common will be a 1585sq m, 24-hour public space designed to draw in pedestrians and provide a focal point for the residents of West Village and the broader West End community.”The Common will also feature a water play area adjacent to Boundary Street.Mr Thompson said the proposal included the development of Factory Lane and Wilson Lane – the first of four public laneways at West Village.“Both laneways will include deep plantings, landscaped market gardens and innovative lighting,” he said.“Wilson Lane will extend from Wilson St, running alongside the heritage-listed Ice Cream Cone Factory, and will include 10 bicycle parking stands.“Factory Lane will be built between the Peters Ice Cream Factory and our first two residential buildings and will be a vibrant, green laneway connected to The Common.”The new works will also include a community space, to be known as the Centre Activities Space, for uses such as an art gallery, conference space, fitness classes, dance classes, theatre or cinema.last_img read more

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WHOI: Alvin Submersible Makes 5000th Dive in Gulf of California

first_imgWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)-operated human-occupied research submersible, Alvin, has made it’s 5000th dive at the end of November 2018.Alvin made its 5,000th dive during an expedition to the Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California.The Navy-owned sub has been through a series of upgrades and advances that have completely re-made the vehicle and vastly expanded its capabilities.“Alvin revolutionized our understanding of the extremes that life can tolerate and caused us to re-think the origin of life on our planet,” said Adam Soule, chief scientist for the National Deep Submergence Facility (NDSF), which operates the sub. “The sub also continues to expand our knowledge of where and how life might exist on other planets.” Alvin, which is supported by funding from the National Science Foundation, executes about 100 dives per year, and over its life has accounted for more than half of all of the scientific dives carried out by human-occupied submersibles worldwide, WHOI noted.Currently, Alvin reaches a depth of 4,500 meters, and soon the sub will complete the final phase of its current upgrade, which will enable it to dive to 6,500 meters, putting 98 percent of the seafloor within its reach.“Alvin helped inspire the development of new generations of deep-submergence technology and vehicles,” said Andy Bowen, director of the National Deep Submergence Facility at WHOI. “And it continues to inspire generations of future scientists, engineers, and explorers.”last_img read more

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