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“READERS FORUM” JULY 12, 2019

first_imgTodays “Readers Poll’ question is:  Do you feel when Scott Danks resigned from the Vanderburgh County Democratic party Chairmanship it will hurt current Democratic City Council candidates election chances? If you would like to advertise in the CCO please contact us at City-County [email protected]: City-County Observer Comment Policy. Be kind to people. Personal attacks or harassment will not be tolerated and shall be removed from our site.We understand that sometimes people don’t always agree and discussions may become a little heated.  The use of offensive language and insults against commenters shall not be tolerated and will be removed from our site.Any comments posted in this column do not represent the views or opinions of the City-County Observer, our media partners or advertisersFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare,We hope that today’s “READERS FORUM” will provoke honest and open dialogue concerning issues that we, as responsible citizens of this community, need to address in a rational and responsible way.,Todays “Readers Poll’ question is:  Do you feel when Scott Danks resigned from the Vanderburgh County Democratic party Chairmanship it will hurt current Democratic City Council candidates election chances? We hope that today’s “READERS FORUM” will provoke honest and open dialogue concerning issues that we, as responsible citizens of this community, need to address in a rational and responsible way.WHAT’S ON YOUR MIND TODAY?center_img If you would like to advertise in the CCO please contact us at City-County [email protected]: City-County Observer Comment Policy. Be kind to people. Personal attacks or harassment will not be tolerated and shall be removed from our site.We understand that sometimes people don’t always agree and discussions may become a little heated.  The use of offensive language and insults against commenters shall not be tolerated and will be removed from our site.Any comments posted in this column do not represent the views or opinions of the City-County Observer, our media partners or advertisers,Todays “Readers Poll’ question is:  Do you feel when Scott Danks resigned from the Vanderburgh County Democratic party Chairmanship it will hurt current Democratic City Council candidates election chances?last_img read more

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“READERS FORUM” JANUARY 31, 2018

first_imgWHATS ON YOUR MIND TODAY?We hope that today’s “Readers Forum” will provoke honest and open dialogue concerning issues that we, as responsible citizens of this community, need to address in a rational and responsible way?”Todays “Readers Poll” question is: Do you feel that President Trump did a credible job presenting his State Of The Union speech last night?Please take time and read our articles entitled “STATEHOUSE Files, CHANNEL 44 NEWS, LAW ENFORCEMENT, READERS POLL, BIRTHDAYS, HOT JOBS” and “LOCAL SPORTS”.  You now are able to subscribe to get the CCO daily.If you would like to advertise on the CCO please contact us City-County [email protected]’S FOOTNOTE:  Any comments posted in this column do not represent the views or opinions of the City-County Observer or our advertisers. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Winter Weather Advisory in Effect for Wednesday Morning

first_imgThe National Weather Service issued a winter weather advisory in effect for Ocean City from 4 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday (Feb. 26).Light snow is expected to begin by dawn and continue through the morning. While accumulations are not expected to exceed an inch or two, forecasters warn that snow, sleet or freezing rain could create hazardous driving conditions as people travel to school or work on Wednesday morning.The high temperature is predicted at 33 degrees with a northwest wind 8 to 18 mph. The low on Wednesday night will fall to 12 degrees. And temperatures in the 20s and 30s will stick around at least through the weekend.Tidal flooding is not expected to be an issue with this storm, but high tides are at 5:21 a.m. and 5:50 p.m. at the Ninth Street Bridge. Snow covers the Ocean City Boardwalk after a January 29 storm.last_img read more

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Lukas Prize Project Awards announced for 2010

first_imgThe Nieman Foundation at Harvard and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism recently announced this year’s recipients of the J. Anthony Lukas Prize Project Awards for exceptional nonfiction.The Lukas Prizes, established in 1998 and selected by committee members from Harvard and Columbia, recognize excellence in nonfiction writing that exemplifies the literary grace and commitment to serious research and social concern that characterized the work of the awards’ Pulitzer Prize-winning namesake J. Anthony Lukas, who died in 1997.Winners for 2010 include David Finkel, for his up-close examination of the human costs of making war; James Davidson, for his study of the homoerotic culture of ancient Greece; and Jonathan Schuppe, for his account of life in inner-city Newark, N.J., which focused on the efforts of an ex-con and former drug dealer to help impoverished children in the city’s most depressed neighborhood.To read the full story, visit the Neiman Foundation Web site.last_img read more

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IOP welcomes former Chicago mayor

first_imgThe Institute of Politics (IOP) at the Harvard Kennedy School has announced the fall visiting fellowship of Richard M. Daley, mayor of Chicago from 1989 to 2011.Daley’s fellowship will occur the week of Nov. 28. Visiting fellows traditionally meet with student groups, lead discussion sessions on topical issues and their experiences in public and political service, and participate in public policy classes with students and Harvard faculty.As a former mayor with more than two decades of experience, Daley will also be a featured participant in the institute’s 19th biennial Seminar on Transition and Leadership for Newly-Elected Mayors (co-sponsored by the U.S. Conference of Mayors) Nov. 30-Dec. 2, offering incoming mayors from large cities across the country briefings on leadership and the issues they will face.“We are excited to welcome Mayor Daley to Harvard,” said IOP Director Trey Grayson. “His extensive management experience running a major U.S. city will be invaluable to students and to the dozens of new city leaders attending the institute’s newly elected mayors conference.”last_img read more

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Student body presidential candidates: Mario Markho and Charlie Ortega Guifarro

first_imgWho they are:Presidential candidate Mario Markho is a junior neuroscience major in Keough Hall from Toledo, Ohio. His running mate, Charlie Ortega Guifarro, is a Film, Television and Theatre major with minors in photography and the Journalism, Ethics and Democracy program. Ortega is a junior hailing from Miami currently living in Stanford Hall. They are joined by campaign manager and junior Tiffany Rojas, an off-campus economics major. All three are members of the Balfour-Hesburgh Scholars Program.Top Priority: Reducing dorm inequalityWhile neither Markho nor Ortega have experience working in student government, their respective experiences at Notre Dame prompted in them a desire to give back to the student body and help those with similar backgrounds feel more welcomed, especially in light of the recently implemented three-years-on-campus policy. The two created a comprehensive and practical platform based on improving student life, building on already-existing programs and providing clarity in dealings with the administration.One of the largest areas the two hope to tackle is the longstanding issue of dorm inequality, both within and across residential life. Infrastructure-wise, this includes plans to give fans to dorms without AC and to establish more sound pipelines for repairs and maintenance issues. Socially, the two hope to curb a negative drinking culture and the ever-present danger of sexual assault by establishing clear guidelines for registering parties, adjusting parietal times and implementing a first-time forgiveness policy for all parietals offenses. Holistically, the ticket also hopes to establish an art initiative within residence halls and establish regular opportunities for Confession within dorms.Best Idea: Online registration and scheduling for St. Liam’s and UCCThe Markho-Ortega ticket has a number of insightful suggestions for improving student life, but perhaps none are more practical and feasible than online scheduling for St. Liam’s. While the University already has online scheduling software in place for things as simple as booking a haircut appointment, attempting to schedule an appointment with a psychologist, psychiatrist or physician requires calling or going in person. Adopting this technology for University Health Services would not only be a welcome upgrade, it would also streamline its service and allow for scheduling beyond business hours.Worst Idea: Move parietals to 2 a.m. on Thursdays On one hand, the ticket’s rationale for parietal reform is well-intended; it was created in response to the University’s recent Campus Climate survey, which found that many individuals will choose to not leave situations that put them at risk for sexual assault for fear of punishment. However, the solution Markho and Ortega offer lacks prudence. On their platform, the two justify the time extension with the fact that “countless students have complained that [the parietals] extension does not apply to Thursdays, a night when most students still go out,” but disregard the glaring correlation between party culture and sexual assault. Rather than help the problem, the situation could potentially grow worse with such a change.Most Feasible: Promote a State of the Union / Town Hall to the student bodyAnother key facet of the ticket’s platform is promoting clarity within student government, a part of the organization that has struggled to remain consistent in recent years. The simple yet effective tool of organizing a bi-semester “State of the Union” would force the team to be transparent on its dealings with the University, as well as hold it accountable for implementing its campaign promises.Least Feasible: Establish an extra reading dayWhile not a bad idea in theory, the campaign’s hope to establish not one, but two extra reading days — one per semester — would require putting an incredible amount of pressure on the University and the provost’s office to even consider such a change. It’s extremely doubtful the administration would consider rewriting the academic calendar.Bottom Line: Well-intentioned, but lacking experienceMarkho-Ortega have clearly put work in to building what may be the most concrete platform in the election, and the ticket has many ideas which reflect a practical and insightful lens into where the University falls short. But running through many of their proposals is a common theme of naivete — the two may say they are running on the strength of their platform and not their clout with administrators, but a number of their policies realistically require a tremendous amount of influence that past administrations with much more experience have not even attempted. With just a one-year term, it would frankly be shocking if Markho and Ortega were able to move the University to forgive parietal offenses, publish CIFs or a complete breakdown of tuition. Additionally, several of the campaign’s ideas — such as section funds for resident assistants — are already standard University policy. While the ticket’s best ideas reflect an refreshing outside approach, their inexperience overshadows such proposals.Tags: 2019 Student Government Electionlast_img read more

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The beauty of Smartwool Socks

first_imgSplash…splash, splash, slosh, splash.These were the sounds that accompanied my run through the Shenandoah National Park. A rainy previous day and melting ice and snow had generously provided me some wet and cold conditions for my 15-mile trail run.Normally this type of trail condition would have me upset, and contemplating cutting a run short. Not that I am soft or anything, but my feet get cold, and the added wet could really make for a rough day. Luckily, as shown to me during my 24 mile New Years day run earlier this year in the ice, slush, and snow Smartwool socks have a few tricks up their sleeves.Socks are one of those items that normally we don’t give the most thought to. We just wear them, shuck them off at the end of the day, and don’t give them the credit they deserve. On these runs however I was thanking my Smartwool socks with just about every stride. Not only are they soft and incredibly well tailored, they also are made of wool and therefore keep your feet warm no matter if they are wet or dry.I have been able to try three different variations of Smartwool socks, and now I want to go a bit more in depth on each one.PhD Run Ultra Light MiniThe Ultra Light is just that ultra light. It has padding where it’s necessary then cuts away any excess from there. They are extremely comfortable and hug the foot. Despite being lightweight they do not feel like 5 runs from now they are going to fall apart, a problem I have found with other lightweight offerings. I found these best for runs lasting under an hour and a half, and as the description states they are good for mild weather. Don’t wear them in the bitter cold, they are not meant for it. $15.95PhD Run Light MicroThis sock is a bit more cushioned than the Ultra Light Mini. With a thicker wool construction the sock keeps your keep warm in cold weather without feeling bulky or cumbersome. The people at Smartwool are well smart. The fit is great and again is tight where it needs to be keeping the sock in place no matter what the trail throws at you.PhD Run Graduated Compression Ultra LightThe running crowd is an odd one, and just like most sports we have our own unique dress code. A popular fashion trend is wearing taller socks with shorts. Why you ask? Well the taller socks keeps your shins a bit more protected from thorns and other debris, while also not being as hot as a pair of tights. The Ultra Light is a great choice for this if you’re looking for a pair of longer socks.  I wore them quite a few times on both road and trail and they never slipped down, which was critical. It would surprise you how a small thing like a falling sock wears on you 3 hours into a run. They are soft and fit great just like the other two models. $37.95compressionIf you give Smartwool a closer look, they really are an interesting and neat company. They believe in the “power of comfort” which as they say is “a simple idea: when you’re comfortable, your body performs better, allowing you to forget about what you’re wearing and enjoy the moment.” If there ever were a product that falls under the “Power of Comfort” it would be socks. They keep us warm, comfortable, and allow us to spend more time enjoying the trail than fretting over the elements.The PhD Micro is not yet available online, so I was not able to find a link or picture.Bottom line: Picking socks doesn’t have to be a tough choice, go with Smartwool and make your feet happy.last_img read more

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García Will Try to Prevent a Leftist from Governing Peru

first_imgBy Dialogo July 30, 2010 Congratulations to the Army of Paraguay these scumbags have to be exterminated from the face of the earth; terrorist groups, narco-traffickers, kidnappers, and murderers taught by FARC, enemies of the Colombian population and friends and associates of Hugo Chavez. Peruvian president Alan García will do everything he can to prevent a leftist from taking the reins of one of Latin America’s fastest-growing economies and will lead an offensive in favor of a conservative or centrist candidate in the 2011 election campaign. The conservative leader is expected to attack the opposition with fierce criticism in the last year of his unpopular administration, the free-market policies of which have nonetheless put Peru high on the list of the world’s most dynamic economies, analysts said. One of his victims is Ollanta Humala, an ultranationalist who almost defeated García in the 2006 presidential election and is in fourth place in the polls, but who has complained that he has been unfairly described as an opponent of private investment and who is now trying to moderate his radical rhetoric. García, who will complete the fourth year of his second term on Wednesday, is on his way to surpass a disapproval rating of 65 percent, according to surveys, which will make it an uphill struggle for him if he tries to return for a historic third term from 2016 to 2021, observers agree. His posture as a fervent promoter of private investment and the free market contrasts with the state control of his first term between 1985 and 1990, which ended in an economic crisis, and has marked a divergence from the advance of leftist governments in Latin America. The sixty-one-year-old leader has sought to shake off a past also tarnished by the rise of leftist guerilla groups that reached their height at the end of the 1980s. One of his tactics has been to exploit voters’ memories in recalling the violence of that period. Internal warfare and the rebels’ attempts to overthrow the state left around 69,000 dead or missing, including civilians and military personnel, during the 1980s and 1990s. “The issue of terrorism is a very sensitive one in Peru, and this issue is being used as a propaganda tool,” according to Fernando Tuesta, a political scientist at the Catholic University of Peru and a former head of the state election commission. “The administration has succeeded in placing the terrorists on the same level as its opponents or its enemies, whoever they may be,” he added.last_img read more

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Baldwin Burglary Suspect Sniffed Out by Police Dog

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A police service dog chased down an Elmont man allegedly responsible for three burglaries last year, Nassau County police said.Friday’s early-morning arrest came after police responded to a home on Central Avenue in Baldwin for a burglary in process, police said. When officers arrived they discovered that 23-year-old Troy Deans had fled on foot before entering the house, police said.That’s when police received a second call for a burglary, this time on Clinton Avenue. A Nassau County K-9 officer was called to the scene with his dog, Gehrig, who sniffed out Deans’ location and apprehended him as he fled a yard on foot, police said.During an investigation after Deans’ arrest, police were able to connect him to three other burglaries in the area: Sept. 21, 2012 at a business on Grand Avenue in Baldwin, Nov. 5, 2012 at a home on S. Bayview Avenue in Freeport and Nov. 9, 2012 at a Kings Parkway home in Baldwin, where Deans allegedly also stole a 2011 Toyota Rav4, police said.He was charged with four counts of varying degrees of burglary, two counts of attempted burglary, grand larceny and criminal trespass. Deans will be arraigned Saturday at First District Court in Hempstead.last_img read more

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Everybody’s On Board as Long Island Rail Road Commuter Council Opens First Office on LI–While Capital Funding Is Delayed

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York As calls for funding billions of dollars in capital projects for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority go unheeded in Albany, the Long Island Rail Road Commuter Council will have their own office on Long Island for the first time since its formation. It won’t cost the LIRR a dime, which is fortunate because the railroad doesn’t have any extra money right now to spend.In honor of the mostly symbolic occasion, the council held a ceremony on June 5 with a dozen or more local elected officials on hand to celebrate the railroad’s past, with memorabilia provided by Steven Quigley of the National Railway Historical Society’s Long Island Sunrise Trail Chapter, and to promote a better future for LIRR commuters.“The Long Island Rail Road Commuter Council’s new office will provide a great resource for commuters,” said Nassau County Executive Mangano, who reportedly donated the 300-square-foot space on the third floor of the Ralph G. Caso Executive and Legislative Building in Mineola. “My administration looks forward to working with the Commuter Council to help enhance the rider experience for residents utilizing the Long Island Rail Road.”The office, reportedly once used to store Nassau County real estate records, doesn’t come with a staff, according to Mark Epstein, the commuter council’s chairman. He reportedly said the group plans to hold meetings there but no schedule has yet been announced.Founded in 1981 by the New York State Legislature as a citizens’ watchdog group, the commuter council has 11 volunteers who regularly ride the LIRR and are willing to dedicate their time to improving service and safety, and ensuring that the stations and trains are kept clean. Though their powers are only advisory, they have been able to bring problems to light and make a difference in the daily commute. Last year, the LIRR’s ridership totaled 85.8 million passengers—a 3 percent increase from 2013—and represented the third highest ridership since 1949, according to the MTA.“I think we’ve had a number of accomplishments,” says Bill Henderson, executive director of the Permanent Citizens Advisory Committee, an advocacy group for mass transit riders that is based in Manhattan. “We improved the conditions of the stations and the hours of the stations. We’ve also gotten repairs done. One of our biggest areas has been getting more information from the railroad such as options during service diversions.”Another improvement that Henderson’s group is taking credit for is letting riders know more accurately how long train delays will last and where on the lines they are taking place.“Communication is a huge issue,” said Henderson, adding that “knowing what is going on with the railroad can also impact the commute.”Along with communication, commuters are also worried about actual on-time performance and safety, especially after the recent derailments in the last year, most recently on May 12 when an Amtrak train derailed outside Philadelphia, killing eight people and leaving 200 injured.The opening of the new office not only gives the LIRRCC a presence on the Island, but also gives the council better opportunities to establish connections with political leaders and commuters, Henderson said.“The opening of LIRRCC’s first Long Island office will help facilitate improved communication between Council members and the riding public, allowing the commuters’ concerns to be easily heard,” said Sen. Carl L. Marcellino (R-Syosset). “This will help increase their efforts in fostering a stronger and more responsive transportation system. The LIRRCC should be commended for working to improve the quality of the service on the Long Island Rail Road.”Throughout the year, the LIRRCC hosts “Meet the Commuter” days at different times and stations. During this event, the LIRRCC talks to riders about current issues affecting the LIRR and gets feedback on how stations could improve.As many Long Island commuters know, many problems need to be addressed. To address public concerns over derailment issues, the LIRR says it is working on new rail cars with improved safety systems. The LIRRCC became very interested in commuter safety after learning that during the Amtrak crash in May passengers were not able to escape from the cars.The LIRR, originally formed in 1834 to transport agricultural products, still operates essentially on the same railway infrastructure. Henderson believes the Quigley exhibit was necessary for the new LIRRCC office opening.“It’s important to understand some of the history of the railroad,” he said. “Some of the issues [facing the LIRR] today are because of how the railroad came together.”In addition to helping to improve service, the LIRRCC also monitors travel patterns and makes recommendations. Not as many people are commuting from suburban areas to Manhattan than in the past. Non-commuter ridership has declined by 66 percent, while commuter ridership has declined by 7 percent, according to studies.The MTA Capital Program 2015-2019, a five-year plan pegged at $32 billion, may have started in January but it still awaits final approval by the State Legislature. Improvements are definitely needed, according to the MTA, which noted that mechanical failures have increased delays by 35 percent, and decreased economic activity by 12.8 percent.According to the Tri-State Transportation Campaign, a nonprofit mass transit advocacy group based in Manhattan, more than 60 percent of the new 2015 capital program will be devoted to maintaining the LIRR infrastructure as well as making the rail cars safer. The capital program will also focus on improving station platforms at Babylon, Nostrand Avenue and Hunterspoint Avenue, which could cost $380 million, completing a double track between Farmingdale and Ronkonkoma to eliminate delays when trains break down, and building a new station in Elmhurst.The East Side Access is the first expansion of the LIRR in more than a century. Once finished, it will allow the LIRR to connect to Grand Central Terminal and reduce the travel time by 30 to 40 minutes each way for an estimated 160,000 riders daily. The ambitious project was originally planned to be completed by 2009 and cost $4.3 billion, according to the state comptroller’s office, but its completion date has been extended four times in 10 years while the price tag has kept going up. Now, the East Side Access is expected to be done by 2023 and run $10.8 billion.With Spencer Rumseylast_img read more

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