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Utah Men’s Basketball Faces Washington State Saturday

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSALT LAKE CITY-Saturday, Utah men’s basketball (11-7, 2-4 in Pac-12 play) hosts Washington State (12-8, 3-4 in Pac-12) as the Utes and Cougars are middling in the conference standings ahead of the tilt at the Huntsman Center.In his ninth season at the helm of the Utes’ program, Larry Krystkowiak (166-118, .585 at Utah; 208-138, 601 as a collegiate head coach) led Utah to a 67-66 win over Washington Thursday.The Utes score 75.3 points per game as Utah ranks 89th nationally in scoring offense.Sophomore forward Timmy Allen leads the Utes in scoring (19.4 points per game) and rebounding (7.6 boards per game).Sophomore guard Both Gach (10.9 points per game) and freshman guard Rylan Jones (10.4 points per game, and team-bests in assists [86] and steals [18]) also score in double figures on-average for the Utes.Freshman center Branden Carlson continues to lead the Utes in blocked shots on the season with 15 swats.Utah gives up 72.4 points per game as the Utes are tied for 252nd nationally in scoring defense with Cal Poly.Washington State is coached by Kyle Smith who is 12-8 (.600) in his first season at the helm of the Cougars’ program.Washington State scores 71.6 points per game as the Cougars rank 173rd nationally in scoring offense.Sophomore forward CJ Elleby leads Washington State in scoring (18.8 points per game), rebounding (7.1 boards per game) and steals (33).Junior guard Isaac Bonton (14.3 points per game) leads the Cougars in assists (72) and Slovenian national, forward Aljaz Kunc has a team-best 11 blocked shots.Washington State surrenders 67.5 points per game as the Cougars rank 138th nationally in scoring defense.The Utes lead the Cougars 25-4 all-time and 17-1 at Salt Lake City. Utah has won the last 11 games overall in the series. Tags: Utah Men’s Basketball/Washington State Men’s Basketball January 25, 2020 /Sports News – Local Utah Men’s Basketball Faces Washington State Saturday Brad James Written bylast_img read more

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How ABB’s ‘game-changing’ subsea power system will impact the offshore oil and gas industry

first_imgAt depths of 3,000 metres, in a region known as the abyssal plain, little to no light finds its way to the ocean floor. Strange, jelly-like creatures subsist on decaying organic matter raining down from above, while atmospheric pressure 300-times that experienced at the surface exerts itself in every direction.Yet despite these hostile conditions, ambitious oil and gas explorers have sought to extract fuels from the deep reaches of the sea – constructing elaborate equipment capable of extending thousands of metres down from the surface to breach the seabed.Delivering the necessary power to this subsea equipment has proven a tricky obstacle to overcome, requiring the construction of surface-level platforms to accommodate the tools for generating and distributing electrical energy to pumps, compressors and other devices.The great vision for many firms pursuing this kind of deep-water resource exploration is for an underwater factory capable of sitting on the sea floor near to the well, operating autonomously to carry out the various operations needed to support extraction. Subsea power system is the end result of a $100m joint industry projectThe culmination of the $100m underwater power project was a successful 3,000-hour test run of the equipment at the remote harbour town of Vaasa, Finland – which ABB claims proves the commercial viability of its creation.The subsea technology has been developed to operate at depths of up to 3,000 metres and to deliver up to 100MW of continuous power through a single cable over distances reaching 600 kilometres.ABB’s equipment being lowered in the harbour in Vaasa for underwater testing (Credit: ABB)These parameters dramatically widen the scope of existing deep-water power infrastructure, offering a range of financial and operational benefits, including lower risks and energy intensity, fewer costs associated with topside construction and a lower cost of decommissioning at the end of a project.“You have in principle new a technology that can reach 3,000 metres deep, reaching assets far from any infrastructure and reaching wells much farther out than we could manage before,” says Per Erik Holsten, ABB’s head of energy industries in northern Europe.“And you can provide this technology with green or hybrid energy that really gives the benefit of environmental friendliness.“There are productivity and energy savings that you can achieve by putting the energy source close to the well. You don’t have to transmit electricity through many cables over long distances — instead, you have just one cable and then distribute the power in the vicinity of the system.“And if you consider that it’s almost a completely autonomous unit – you don’t need to intervene for thirty years – you can only imagine the calculation of financial benefits you could get out of this.” Subsea tech had to be designed to withstand hostile conditions of the deep oceanOnce power has been deployed to the sea floor through the long-distance cable, it is then regulated by infrastructure designed specifically to withstand the harsh environment of the deep sea.Developing and testing mechanical equipment that can survive the conditions of the abyssal plain, particularly without significant maintenance for up to 30 years, was a challenging venture – one that required a concerted effort of trial and error with various components and manufacturing techniques.The vision for a subsea power unit controlling oil and gas production in the deep sea (Credit: ABB)ABB research and development principal engineer for subsea technology Henning Nesheim explains: “The deep sea is comparable to outer space in several ways – but especially the remoteness and unknown conditions.“Our equipment has to withstand the immense pressure of the ocean. The electronic modules are filled with nitrogen at atmospheric pressure levels and the equipment is protected by very thick steel walls.”The infrastructure’s core components comprise a control hub for remotely managing and monitoring the system, medium voltage switchgear for distributing electricity to the various parts of the substation, and variable speed drive (VSD) units which control the motor torque and speed of pumps and compressors. Deep-sea power equipment will open up new opportunities for oil and gas companiesTotal, Chevron and Equinor partnered ABB throughout the six-year process, providing their end-user expertise of offshore exploration to the manufacturer, and giving regular feedback throughout the development period.This involvement naturally allows them early access to the subsea technology – although now fully-developed the equipment is commercially available to any company that wishes to use it.Head of Total’s research centre in Stavanger, Norway, Jeremy Cutler says: “This is what we call disruptive technology.“It’s a transformative technology that is going to allow us to put power subsea where we need it, without the expensive solutions of the topside variable speed drives and the different power cables.A topside offshore oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico (Credit: Office of Response and Restoration/Flickr)“It’s going to enable us to open up some of the unexplored areas of the ultra-deep down at 3,000 metres, bringing in new reserves – and who knows what the future applications could be in terms of the renewables industry?“Ultimately, it’s about putting the subsea production system as close as possible to the reservoir, to achieve the drawdowns you need from a pressure point of view to maximise the economic recovery of the oil and gas fields.“It’s about the bigger vision of a subsea factory, which opens up all sorts of vistas for opportunities in the deep water.“This technology means we no longer have this heavy equipment on the platforms – instead we have a more efficient system that should see better use of energy and a reduction of carbon emissions by putting everything subsea.” ABB’s subsea power technology signals a ‘new era’ for offshore oil and gas productionLast week, Swiss-Swedish industrial engineering firm ABB announced it had reached a key milestone in realising this vision – the commercial development of a complete subsea power substation, capable of operating independently in the deep ocean to distribute electricity to drilling equipment.The achievement was the result of a six-year joint industry partnership (JIP) with oil majors Total, Chevron and Equinor, and was celebrated as a significant step forward in the mission to develop a fully-operational subsea factory.ABB senior vice president and managing director for energy industries Kevin Kosisko says: “This signals a new era for oil and gas operations — an era in which we can go into deeper and more remote waters, and place equipment on the seabed without maintenance for more than 30 years.“Full subsea electrification has been a long-time coming. It’s not easy, but we’ve done it. Oil and gas companies now have access to technology that will completely transform how they operate.”Illustration outlining how the subsea system works (Credit: ABB)The autonomous subsea power substation has been heralded as a “game-changing” development for an oil and gas industry under pressure from environmental campaigning and global initiatives to reduce reliance on fossil fuels.ABB claims the new equipment will allow firms to halve emissions created during existing offshore extraction processes — due in large part to the fact that a single umbilical cable, which can be tied back 600 kilometres to land, enables power generated onshore to be deployed to the underwater drilling site.This opens the door for these companies to use clean, renewable supplies of energy to run their deep-water operations, rather than needing to burn hydrocarbons out at sea to generate power.ABB vice-president and global industry manager for oil and gas Martin Grady explains: “With the arrival of long-distance subsea power transmission and distribution, we are enabling a step-change in the offshore oil and gas industry.“Just as new power transmission capabilities transformed cities globally in the early nineteenth century, the ability to transmit power subsea, over longer distances, and then distribute it locally, will truly transform the way offshore oil and gas developments are designed, built and operated.“We really are at the start of a new epoch in cleaner, safer, more energy-efficient hydrocarbon production using technology that will open up access to power for all users in the ocean space.” ABB’s subsea technology can deliver 100MW of stable power to deepsea drilling equipment at depths of up to 3,000 metres, more than 600 kilometres from shore ABB has developed autonomous power distribution infrastructure for deep-water oil and gas operations (Credit: ABB) Industrial technology manufacturer ABB has completed final testing of an autonomous subsea power system, which has been designed to improve oil and gas production from deep-water locations. Andrew Fawthrop travelled to the harbour town of Vaasa, Finland, to see the equipment in its final stages of development.last_img read more

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20 Classic John Lennon Videos Were Just Uploaded To YouTube [Watch]

first_imgYou can watch the new videos in the playlist below, and navigate through them using the icon on the top left of the player. Enjoy! John Lennon remains one of the most influential musicians to this day, as his music proudly symbolizes the hope for peace and justice in the world. Through his work with The Beatles and as a solo musician, Lennon’s revolutionary music has lived proudly for years after his untimely death.It is with this legacy in mind that we happily share a new series of videos, released by Lennon’s widow Yoko Ono just a few days ago. Taken from the 2003 LEGEND DVD, the videos were created for some of Lennon’s most well known songs, including “Imagine,” “Instant Karma!” and more. Ono released twenty of these videos onto YouTube, where they’re streaming for free – just in time for the holidays.last_img read more

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The Groove Orient Shares Soulive Cover Video And Announces Tour Dates

first_imgFlorida jam group The Groove Orient are firing things up in 2017, with a major tour announcement and a very fun video! Check out their newly released cover of Soulive’s funky track “Cannonball” below.You can see the band’s full tour announcement in the poster below as well.last_img

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The Weissman Center at work

first_imgThe Weissman Preservation Center, an arm of Harvard Library that recently hosted a group of Russian conservators for training, celebrated its first decade last year. A glimpse of the center’s conservation work during 2009-10:More than 2,000 rare books were treated, including a bound volume of Emily Dickinson’s favorite sheet music.More than 6,000 paper objects were treated, including 407 large-format drawings by Harvard College undergraduates from 1782 to 1839.Approximately 1,500 rare photographs were treated; another 17,000 were assessed; and more than 29,500 were “rehoused” using archival materials.More than 3,500 daguerreotypes were included in a new online collection launched last December, “Daguerreotypes at Harvard.” Included are some of the earliest photographs of the moon, portraits of Africa-born American slaves, 19th century Harvard class albums, and vintage pictures of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and others.More than 3,000 audiovisual items were documented using a new survey tool. A third were flagged for preservation reformatting.last_img read more

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Poverty in America, 2012

first_imgScholars from across the nation gathered at Harvard on Friday to examine the persistent problems of race, poverty, and economic inequality in the United States. The conference was focused around the 25th anniversary of the publication of “The Truly Disadvantaged” by University Professor William Julius Wilson.Through his writing and research, Wilson, director of the Joblessness and Urban Poverty Research Program at the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy at Harvard Kennedy School (HKS), is credited with changing the national dialogue about the causes of and possible remedies for urban poverty in America.“He [Wilson] not only made [poverty] a topic that was acceptable and indeed important to reflect on and think about and deal with, he actually put academic rigor and frames and substance around these issues with strong, compelling hypotheses and data,” said David T. Ellwood, HKS dean and conference panelist.Conference topics ranged from social dislocation to the politics of inequality.“I want to be able to communicate, not only to the people who are at this conference, but [to] those who hear about the conference, how important the issues of poverty and concentrated poverty are and to try to provide a comprehensive understanding of these conditions and how they’ve changed over time,” said Wilson.When asked if the state of urban poverty had changed in the quarter century since his book was published, Wilson said it generally had not.“Things are qualitatively similar to the way they were when I wrote ‘The Truly Disadvantaged,’ ” he said. “But there have been some changes, and one major change has been the impact of immigration in inner-city neighborhoods, including the revitalization of some of these neighborhoods.”The first panel, “Deindustrialization and Joblessness,” set the tone for the conference with fresh data and new questions.“Policy changes in the 1990s further pushed black men out,” said Barry Bluestone of Northeastern University, referring to the fact that the black male employment rate fell from 72 percent in 1970 to 54 percent in 2010. As of three years ago, according to census information, only one in four black males was working.Conference participants discussed how the loss of manufacturing jobs has had a greater impact on the earnings of black men, and the panelists considered whether the concentration of poverty has changed since the publication of Wilson’s book.HKS faculty taking part in the discussions included Mary Jo Bane, Thornton Bradshaw Professor of Public Policy and Management; Kathryn Edin, professor of public policy and management; Christopher Jencks; Malcolm Wiener Professor of Social Policy; and Bruce Western, director, Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy.The august gathering humbled Wilson, and the one time he had trouble finding his words was when he was asked how he felt about all the intellectual firepower assembled in recognition of his work. “It’s mind-boggling,” he said.The Joblessness and Urban Poverty Research Program, the Department of African and African American Studies, the Department of Sociology, and the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research co-sponsored the conference.last_img read more

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VCE’s First Distinguished Engineer

first_imgIn an industry like ours, to stand still would be to fall behind. VCE’s inception was the result of true innovation, as leaders from our three investor companies came together in a joint venture designed to disrupt the market and provide customers with a solution that truly fits their needs. More than four years later, we’d say this venture has been extremely successful, but we haven’t forgotten our roots. VCE is dedicated to recognizing the innovative individuals within the company that are moving VCE forward. To honor the people that are truly making a difference, VCE recently introduced its Distinguished Engineers Program and announced its inaugural honoree, Dan Butzer.The VCE Distinguished Engineers Program gives the company the ability to recognize engineers who have gone above and beyond what they do on a daily basis. Through a formal nomination process, these exceptional technical leaders are identified for having helped define and develop technology that solves customer challenges. This group will contain some of the best and brightest employees in the company that have directly contributed to its success.A VCE Distinguished Engineer not only demonstrates great technical skill, but also displays great leadership qualities, freely sharing their knowledge and wisdom for the betterment of those around them and the company at large. A Distinguished Engineer inspires those around them to put their best ideas forward. They are the “go-to” people for solutions and ideas.As a member of the program, Distinguished Engineers are given opportunities for further skills development, as well as greater access to key VCE executives. The program is focused on cross-business collaboration, giving participants a glimpse into things beyond their usual day-to-day activities. The goal of the program is to then create a highly technical and innovative group that looks at VCE across its lines of business.As such, I cannot think of a more deserving first inductee to the program than my colleague, Dan Butzer, senior principal vArchitect. Dan is a “change agent” for VCE – continuously setting the pace for innovation at the company. His dedication to the company stretches far beyond a single region, with Dan lending his expertise globally, across the Americas, Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) and Asia Pacific Japan (APJ) regions to help ensure the various teams are armed with any and all information needed to address customers’ needs.Dan is highly solution oriented, and is able to approach situations from unique perspectives to provide a solution that is not just acceptable, but exceptional. He is a trusted adviser who is generous with his knowledge and time, bringing those he works with up to a higher level of knowledge and understanding. As one of his colleagues wrote, “When it comes to the data centers of today, I live by the rule that if Dan doesn’t know ‘it’ or know who knows ‘it’, ‘it’ is probably not worth knowing.” For these reasons (and many more), Dan has earned his place as a Distinguished Engineer.Not only has Dan been my right hand for more than three years, he’s become a dear friend. Dan’s dedication to the enablement of VCE staff, customers, and partners would overwhelm most people. Dan always finds time to help, always teaches and shares his extensive knowledge. Dan amazes us all daily!I want to personally thank Dan for his contributions to VCE, its customers and his fellow employees. Dan, and his future fellow Distinguished Engineers, will no doubt do some remarkable things for the company. VCE prides itself on having a culture of innovation, and it is because of every employee here who throws the status quo out the window and gets their hands dirty. We are poised for a big year ahead, and with contributions and leadership from Dan and our Distinguished Engineer honorees, I can guarantee that no one will catch us standing still.last_img read more

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UN refugee agency: Asylum ‘under attack’ on Europe’s borders

first_imgGENEVA (AP) — The U.N. refugee agency is warning that asylum is “under attack” at Europe’s borders, calling on countries to investigate and stop illegal “pushbacks” and expulsions. UNHCR said new arrivals to the European Union continue to decline each year, with 95,000 arrivals by sea and land last year — a drop of 23% compared to 2019 and by one-third compared to 2018 when over 141,000 arrived. UNHCR Assistant High Commissioner for Protection Gillian Triggs said the situation should be manageable, expressing regret that the issue of asylum remains “politicized and divisive” despite the declining numbers.last_img read more

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Odds & Ends: Baby on the Way for Amanda Seyfried & Thomas Sadoski & More

first_img View Comments Thomas Sadoski & Amanda Seyfried(Photo: Bruce Glikas) Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today. Baby on the Way for Amanda Seyfried & Thomas SadoskiHappy news for these stars of stage and screen! Amanda Seyfried is expecting a baby with her fiancé, Tony nominee Thomas Sadoski, the New York Post reports. The mommy and daddy-to-be met when they appeared together in Neil LaBute’s The Way We Get By off-Broadway last year and got engaged in September. Congratulations to the happy couple!Showtime Cancels Masters of SexThe Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan-led Masters of Sex series, which featured Tony winner Annaleigh Ashford, has been canceled, Deadline writes. The fourth season recently ended its run on Showtime; we look forward to seeing what all involved with the period drama do next!Get Tappy for the Holidays With the Dames at SeaWhat better way to usher in that most wonderful time of the year than with the Dames at Sea tapping in holiday outfits? Check out below as Broadway.com vlogging queen Lesli Margherita, Mara Davi, Eloise Kropp and more Main Stem favorites get into the seasonal spirit with Christopher Rice (The Book of Mormon).last_img read more

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Jobless rate falls to lowest level in nation

first_imgJobless rate falls to lowest level in nationThe federal Bureau of Labor Statistics has ranked Vermont’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate of 3.1 percent the lowest in the country.One month ago, the state’s unemployment rate was third lowest. Governor Douglas said this is another indication that Vermont’s hard work and commitment to economic development and job creation is paying off.The Department of Employment and Training has announced a seasonally adjusted unemployment rate of 3.1 percent for Vermont in October, down two tenths of a point from the previous month. The national unemployment rate was 5.5 percent, up one tenth of a point from the prior month.Unemployment rates for Vermonts 13 labor market areas ranged from 1.4 percent in Hartford, to 4.3 percent in Enosburg. Labor market area rates are not seasonally adjusted; for comparison, the unadjusted rate for Vermont was 2.7 percent.The unemployment picture in our state improved in October as it has throughout most of the year, said Patricia A McDonald, commissioner of the Department of Employment and Training. The job statistics continue to fluctuate from month-to-month but still show an encouraging trend.Seasonally adjusted employment retreated by 500 in October after surging by 900 in September. The latest data shows the state has a net increase of 2,600 jobs compared to one year ago. Health care and social assistance has provided the largest boost during that time. Firms providing professional and business services have also expanded. Leisure and hospitality employment was up 400 compared to October a year ago. The number of manufacturing jobs was also higher than last year, but the sector experienced modest losses from September to October on a seasonally adjusted basis.The number of nonfarm jobs in Vermont, before seasonal adjustment, increased by over 2,200 from last month. Both public and private educational services contributed to the increase as the new academic year began. Transportation services also benefited from the return to school. Leisure and hospitality employment contracted less than usual for October, but still offset some of the resurgence in education. Construction employment fell as seasonal layoffs occurred.The number of nonfarm jobs was up 0.8 percent compared to last year, which is slightly above the growth rate reported last month.last_img read more

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