Category: xzaxxukosfye

Hobbled Robitaille still has drive to play

first_img Robitaille didn’t officially commit to playing this season until the lockout ended, but he had spent the previous months training hard in order to be sure he would be ready to play. “That was the toughest I worked in the summer in eight or nine years,” Robitaille said. “I knew it wasn’t going to be easy, so I did a lot of skating in July, which is something we usually don’t do. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week “If you’re not (prepared) mentally, it’s tough. If Brett wasn’t there mentally any more, there’s no reason to play. The reason I am back is because I knew I was willing to do all that. The grind of going through the games and workouts and injuries, I like all that. I love the game so I had no doubt I would come back.” Robitaille signed a one-year, $1 million contract and has one goal and two assists in five games. According to the Kings, Robitaille hadn’t missed a game with an injury since the 1999-2000 season. He hurt his groin late in Thursday’s game, when a stick got caught up with his legs and he twisted the wrong way. Robitaille said he will attempt to skate today or Tuesday. Welcome back: Taking Robitaille’s place in the lineup was Ken Belanger, who played his first NHL game since he suffered a potentially career-ending concussion on Nov. 5, 2002. Belanger played one game in the United Hockey League last season but said he left the team because his NHL background made him feel like a target for young players who wanted to make a name. Belanger asked the Kings if he could attend training camp as a non-roster invitee and he made the team. “I almost mentally prepared myself with the thought that I was going to come here and win a spot,” Belanger said. “I think the odds were probably against me, because a lot of guys played in Manchester (last season) and there were a lot of new draft picks, but I didn’t even pay attention to that. “I just had it in my mind that I was going to play here.” Belanger previously played 47 games with the Kings over two seasons and said he didn’t inquire about trying out for any other teams. “It didn’t even cross my mind to play for another team,” Belanger said. “(My wife and I) kind of sit and home now and think, ‘What would we be doing?’ ” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!center_img Luc Robitaille missed Sunday’s game with a sore groin, but a little perspective came with the injury. The day before, Brett Hull, Robitaille’s former teammate and fellow future Hall of Famer, announced his retirement and explained that he could no longer play to his high standards. Robitaille, who at 39 is Hull’s junior by just 17 months, pushed himself during the lockout to avoid the same feeling. last_img read more

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Heroku’s Security Slip-Up – Is It Time for a PaaS Security Certification Standard?

first_imgklint finley Today Heroku, a Ruby platform-as-a-service which was recently acquired by Salesforce.com, disclosed a serious security issue. The vulnerability has been fixed, and there is no evidence that it was ever exploited. Earlier this week, NodeFu had its databases deleted when admins revealed its CouchOne password on Github. Missteps by PaaS providers leave customers at risk and jeopardize the reputation of the public cloud.Is it time for a PaaS security certification standard?First of all, credit where credit is due. The Heroku security issue was discovered by David E. Chen, the founder of Heroku competitor Duostack. Chen notified Heroku and didn’t disclose the issue on his own blog until Heroku issued a statement about it. Heroku also deserves credit for publicly disclosing the issue.I’ve written before that the public cloud can be more secure than on-premise solutions. That still holds true. But no solution offers perfect security, as these incidents demonstrate. Infrastructure-as-a-service gives customers more control over their data. There are government standards for software-as-a-service that private companies can also use to assess the security of a service. PaaS customers usually have less transparency into how the system works than IaaS customers, but more power (and therefore more room for error) than SaaS customers. Although providers should be responsible for customer’s security, Chen notes that customers shouldn’t be helpless when it comes to their own security on platforms:Take security into your own hands. Users should be responsible for verifying that their providers meet their needs. Ask questions. Ultimately, you are responsible for your app and it’s up to you to find out what your provider really does for your app’s security behind the shallow promises of marketing materials.That’s a good starting point, but what questions should be asked? If PaaS really is the future, as we’ve predicted, then we’re going to need some some good questions.One particular question to ask is suggested by Chen: how are users partitions segmented from each other? Chen writes:There are two strategies for providers to partition the resources for each user I would like to discuss: virtualization, or operating system/runtime privileges. In the first, each user is provided with a contained copy of what appears to be a complete machine dedicated to their use. In the latter, many users share one machine (which may be virtualized itself). Heroku has chosen the latter approach, though this is likely not apparent to many users.That’s a good starting point. However, “Have you ever posted your database password in Github?” is probably not going to be a helpful question. There are still going to be slip-ups, and gauging a providers reputation and security procedures is going to be increasingly important. What if there was a way for providers to receive certification? A set of best practices for PaaS security, along with an independent auditing organization, could be just the thing the industry and its customers need right now.Image credit: Bichuas (E. Carton) Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… IT + Project Management: A Love Affair Tags:#enterprise#Products center_img Related Posts 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of…last_img read more

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Facebook Pushes Location: Adds Event Check-Ins, Places Maps

first_imgIf you’ve ever thrown a party and invited all your friends on Facebook, then you’re well aware: RSVPs mean nothing. If you’re on the other end of things and you want to know whether a party’s happening or a dud – again, RSVPs mean nothing. Today, Facebook updated its iPhone app, adding two new features – the ability to check in to events and a map for seeing where all your friends are checked in. Now, if you’re wondering if that party’s happening or not, you might be able to just look and see if your friends have checked in there. Of course, that all depends on whether or not Facebook can really bring location to a critical mass of popularity. While that still seems to be a big “if,” this update is certainly a push in that direction.TechCrunch’s MG Siegler first noticed the features, noting that users could only previously check in via Facebook Places. The new feature takes into account the time, the time of the event and the user location to determine whether or not to allow the user to check in. Once a user checks in, that information gets posted to their wall and their friends’ timelines, as well as shows up in the list of users checked in on Facebook Places.The most obvious user benefit, it would seem, is being able to see not only where your friends are, but what event they might be at. They don’t simply check in to the restaurant down the street, but to the trivia night that’s happening that they were invited to on Facebook. The real benefit, we have to imagine, will be for the companies and brands throwing events that want to gather data on who actually attended an event. Imagine the possibilities for all of those companies who throw parties at events like SXSW, with thousands of RSVPs. They have a list of people who were interested in the event, but not necessarily those who attended. Now, they could potentially have both. What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement As part of this same update, Facebook added the simple ability to view where all of your friends are checked-in on a map. On the Places page of the iPhone app, there are now two options – activity and map. The map shows any friends that are checked in. It’s a simple, but potentially fruitful, feature for seeing where your friends who use Facebook Places are.Unfortunately, the event check-in appears to be a bit broken, at the moment. We created a test event, checked in, and went to the map, only to find that it had placed the event somewhere in the ocean off the coast of Africa. If you click on the address of the event in the event itself, however, it appropriately takes you to exactly that location in Google Maps. Hmm.Problems aside, why does any of this matter? It could be another inroad for Facebook to convince mainstream users that checking in, both to places and events, is a normal and customary thing to do. And in doing so, it could offer brands another reason to host events on Facebook instead of the plethora of other invite and event sites, such as Eventbrite or Plancast. RSVPing only indicates a basic interest, or a desire to hold your place, just in case. Actually checking in to an event means that you were indeed there, which could be a valuable piece of information for event organizers. Beyond that, if people are further encouraged to check in, they may begin doing it at other times to. Something like Facebook Places is, after all, only useful if people actually use it. Related Posts The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Tags:#Facebook#Location#mobile#news#NYT#web mike melanson Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaceslast_img read more

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When you’re thinking IoT expansion, think horizontal

first_imgIn the next interview in our series on the IoT ecosystem, we tackle what enterprise market participants need to consider when using IoT to help build out their business value beyond a single application — and for that, you need to think hard about your horizontal platform.We spoke with Nokia’s Jason Collins, vice president of IoT marketing, and Frank Ploumen, IoT new product introduction and strategy, to get their take on how you might be limiting your IoT value with short-term thinking of you’re not thinking horizontal.Readwrite: So, Jason, define how you see scalability for our enterprise clients that you guys may be talking to already; think in terms of product expansion or extension.Jason Collins: When most people think about scalability in the IoT space they would initially start thinking about the size of a deployment. In thinking about size they would take into consideration the problem they are trying to solve. For example, I want to measure temperature across a geographic landscape and I’m going to have X number of devices to do this. And that’s certainly one aspect of scalability, but more importantly, I think the first thing they should think about are the operational impacts of that kind of a deployment. If you’re going to deploy 20,000 devices and there is a security problem with those devices how do you update them, for example?See also: If data is the new oil, who is your refiner?And so scalability is also about operations. And then scalability is also across time. Nothing is ever static. Possible changes that may occur are: You may need to change a vendor out because they go out of business or a vendor becomes not suitable for something you want to do in the future. You may need new kinds of devices that support more features that you might be considering to improve your applications. So you need to support scalability across time, and across vendors, and you should think of scalability across efforts.This last point needs a little more explanation. If you’re a company that has multiple IoT activities that you’re going to deploy over time, how do you ensure that by the time you get to the second, third and fourth business objective that requires a new and different deployment, that you’re actually leveraging what you did in that first deployment? When you take this into consideration, scalability is a big deal to ensure that your future deployments are less cumbersome and more efficient.Frank Ploumen: I’ll have a few words. I want to particularly stress the point of multi-vendor interoperability. A lot of times when we talk to customers, the question that we get is, I can buy a solution from vendor XYZ that is turnkey and does everything from the application to the device, why would I want the hassle of this whole platform? And the discussion we usually get into is, ‘The last time I deployed a major platform or network, once it was finally deployed some things had changed causing higher hardware; higher integration costs; device OEM changes or all of the above.So the cost of ownership over the whole lifetime heavily depends on the ability to mix and match hardware devices for many vendors to a single application, and we’ve become very used to this in other industries. If I’m talking about Wi-Fi for example, the fact that Wi-Fi on one side of the device needs to talk to a specific router on the other side doesn’t matter. Wi-Fi is Wi-Fi. Ethernet is Ethernet. Windows is Windows. So we’ve become very used to mix and matching anything. We all want the same mix and match capability in IoT solutions which require a horizontal platform capability. However, in the IoT space, we’re still stuck in very proprietary solutions where only certain permutations and combinations work.RW: If that’s the case and obviously interoperability is the biggest challenge.  I mean I literally spent two hours yesterday, just talking to three different folks at this conference yesterday who were doing different mesh network related hardware deployments for a certain basket of industries. And we should talk about that, I can feel them pulling back and saying I can’t sort out everything about interoperability, I’m trying to cover this space, for me to be able to explain it to my client. So in your minds what does the ideal platform look like, given that…?JC: That’s exactly why you have a layered model. As an example, look at something as simple and well-known as the OSI network model. The fact is that there are already standards around the Internet but the way it starts is that you actually have a lot of different connectivity technologies and different layers that hide the complexity and hide the lack of standards from the layer beneath.So part of this is, yes we need to have standards out of the bottom end of this platform, but another consideration is, the platform needs to be able to adapt to the standards and proprietary protocols that are there, and also account for the standards that are coming up.FP: Let’s review some of the key layers that come with an IoT solution.At the bottom layer, you have devices or sensors, and they are the source of the data. Then you have networks, and network is a very broad term for local networks, long distance networks, wired, wireless, licensed or unlicensed and so on, or a combination of any of the above, but ultimately networks.Then you have a layer where networks feed into a data mediation or brokerage layer.Then at the top level, we have the stuff that we all know very well and that’s the applications, the dashboards, the very visible stuff.A very important design goal when we talk about scalability and horizontal platforms is that we basically figured an application should be completely agnostic on what happens underneath. Data is data. Temperature is temperature. You, as an application developer should not have to worry where temperature came from, what protocol is used, what device generated it. Your application cares about temperature, that’s all you need to know. Creating this level of segmentation will make interoperability easier.JC: And by the way to that point, if you look at something like IoT versus a generic Internet application, the IoT application is different… because of things like battery life and the size and kinds of data that you’re getting from the devices. Actually, what most people in this industry are used to dealing with which is IP because it’s been around forever…but IP doesn’t actually become a good way of accessing devices as you go lower in the stack.  So there’s a reinvigoration of the need to have an adaption layer because everybody is going to be analyzing and transporting this data using the IP layer and above once it hits the core network. Meanwhile, below that, when you get to the devices IP makes no sense because you’re running out of battery in a week.FP: That’s a very interesting observation. The implication here is that the number of use cases in IoT is so vast, that it’s unrealistic to expect that there’s a one size fits all network typology type of solution. There will be many answers to many different things.What I do on a battery constrained device that runs in the field (e.g. in oil and mining) versus a powered device used in the connected home is different from the physical layer point of view. But the application should not have to be tailored because otherwise, you keep redesigning and re-architecting applications for hybrid environments.RW: You’re turning a hardware problem into a software problemFP: Exactly. So if I build very simply let’s say an asset tracking application. In one city, I might be tracking over a cellular network. Why would I have to redesign that if I am deploying the same application in mining on a custom proprietary network. It’s the same application. Or maybe I have hybrids. I have networks that have some devices coming in over one network and then devices coming in over a new network. Like when we roll out 5G we will start rolling out devices. You don’t want to have to deal with applications that work in the old world and then different applications that work in the new world.RW: A lot of what you just pointed out there is a story that I see over and over again. Some company has to do IoT strategy, so come let me explain it to you. And when I sit down with them and it’s a brand that you wouldn’t think of as being IoT right out of the box, it’s not one of the sort of pillars of IoT around communication or some aspect of big data or a specific hardware industrial, smart home marker, whoever, who you can see why they’d want to provide better connections or to create a network out of their core product.You can see that they want to dig out the corner of the world that they can understand. if you were to say how do you build a horizontal platform, do they need to be told that, do they need to just be made aware that they already have one, how do you picture that conversation going? Obviously, it’s client specific, but do they really know what they have already?You can see that they want to dig out the corner of the world that they can understand. if you were to say how do you build a horizontal platform, do they need to be told that, do they need to just be made aware that they already have one, how do you picture that conversation going? Obviously, it’s client specific, but do they really know what they have already?What do you need as an enterprise client to build a horizontal platform? Do you just need to be made aware that you already have the beginnings of this and how to jump off from there?JC: I would say the first thing is becoming convinced that you actually need a platform.  So you see a lot of people going out and building siloed applications which I think is fine as long as all you’re doing is an experiment. It’s when you actually stop and think about how this will answer a real business problem and positively impact your business longer term, is when you should think about a need for a platform that can exist for the next 10 years or more and expand to meet my needs. When you start thinking about scalability issues you quickly come to the conclusion that you shouldn’t be just haphazardly bringing up siloed applications. It is the equivalent of a simplified analogy that goes like this: “I need these two computers to communicate with each other, so therefore I’m going to a string a wire down the wall and then down the hallway.”In the short term that could be fine, until you realize what you wanted to do is to provide everybody in the office with PCs on their desktops and be able to do email. Suddenly you think, ‘Well, maybe stringing a wire isn’t the best idea. Maybe the first idea is to hook up the first two executives to see if they use e-mail as an application, but not such a good idea for actually deploying email for an enterprise.So convincing somebody that they need a platform is first, and then I would say that you probably don’t want to build your own platform because there’s a lot of platforms out there. I should be looking for what I can hook into that already exists that could give me a leg up. And I should start that conversation by thinking about the things we’ve been talking about.  Standards, support for existing proprietary stuff, data mediation: what’s going to make it easier for me to build applications on top of that? What’s going to make it easy for me to hook up my particular devices now and as we move forward into an unknown future?It’s something that we haven’t talked about because I think we’ve been focused kind of on the data mediation piece of the whole problem, but device management is also really, really key to think about–and doing it in standards-based way so that as I increase the size and numbers and kinds of deployments, that I have a way of accessing these devices and doing updates and monitoring battery life in a way that is hidden from the application layer.It’s something that we haven’t talked about because I think we’ve been focused kind of on the data mediation piece of the whole problem, but device management is also really, really key to think about–and doing it in standards-based way so that as I increase the size and numbers and kinds of deployments, that I have a way of accessing these devices and doing updates and monitoring battery life in a way that is hidden from the application layer.FP: The examples that Jason gives are all examples that have to do with operations and the cost over the lifecycle of the service. First enterprises need to understand if they want to pursue IoT or not. Most people have already made that mental decision. And then they jump straight to the use case, like how awesome would it be if I can control or automate or analyze etc. and the operations often become an afterthought. Which is why the platform discussion doesn’t get a front row seat. We’re going to get started, we can control a few things, we hook up a few things, it looks really awesome. Like Jason’s analogy when we strung the two computers together we could get email and I’ll just roll it out to everybody.If you don’t think about that operations problem up front, then you’re really going to get burnt down the road. And here’s where you see two different types of customers. The customers that either have been burnt before and start very carefully to delve into those operational questions. They’re very easily convinced they need a platform. And others are maybe a bit naive in operations and just focus on the use case per se and consider operations something that will come down the road. And that’s a very difficult conversation to have.The second observation here is whether to build it ourselves or whether to buy it, and this is also not a new discussion. If you remember several years ago when a lot of embedded devices had their own custom operating systems and there was a lot of fragmentation in that area. The mindset of the developers often was ‘well I want to avoid paying for licenses, how hard could it be, I download some open source software to build my own version of what I need. We’ve all been there but at some point, you realize it can’t be just downloading an open distribution from Linux. The real value is in not having to maintain the lower layer itself. If it is done well by someone else you are more interoperable with the rest of the world which adds significant value.RW: So that operations gap, I guess it’s been explained to me, I look at some of the Industrial concepts and I see people struggling that we are at a certain level of transparency and data awareness and usefulness. And we want to 2X that, so it’s like the same song but twice as fast. So they can string two computers together and that is functional but it is not ideal. And that pushback between the operations and the data management executive side of the discussion is a chasm that’s challenging them to bridge. Are these silos still too hard to knock down within an organization? Is it going to be a real challenge to have that internal discussion?FP: Well you realize that the history in IoT is quite long. People might have deployed proprietary systems that are basically connected and seem to be very functional. The longer a system is in place without problems, the more afraid people get about dealing with it. When you’ve got let’s say an ancient building automation system from twelve years ago, that talks protocols that no one understands, but it works fantastic even though it should have been retired a long time ago.RW: So we don’t want to open it up because we don’t know what will happen.FP: The problem that comes is if you ever want to do anything more than what is designed for or for example connect new hardware to this platform, well good luck right? It’s a closed island and it is what it is. Now you’re stuck.I’ve seen customers literally come to us, and one particular example a couple of years ago, a customer, I kid you not, told me that they had 37 different building automation systems that were gathering energy data from their real estate. And they could not come up with a way to aggregate and consolidate all of the data so that they could compare energy bills.So you get into situations where nobody wants to touch it because it works. That’s one of the sad things about this old industrial stuff. It is really good at what it does, but you’ve lost all flexibility, and the opportunity to improve it and make it interact with other things in the world. As opposed to looking at the internet with anything connected to anything and which continues growing and picking up new data sources. I’m making a very extreme case here right. But look at something like Alexa in Amazon that we all know. Alexa connects to everything and anything and can control anything. It adds a few hundred different interfaces per month so it becomes richer and more powerful.With Alexa, you’re tearing off a sheet and starting something new with being the leading voice commands platform,What they’ve done is created a really good framework for integrating islands of data. Because otherwise, it wouldn’t be very good if Alexa could just do one thing, it would be a one trick pony.The reason it’s so good is they’ve made it really easy to integrate Alexa against Philips lights, against thermostats, against you name it, so that’s the platform analogy power that you see there. If they hadn’t done that and they made it very narrowly defined, then it wouldn’t have had that power. The platform gives you that ability to very quickly and seamlessly integrate islands of data including those old legacy items that nobody wants to deal with.Published in partnership with Nokia. Internet of Things Makes it Easier to Steal You… ReadWrite Sponsors Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Follow the Puckcenter_img Related Posts Tags:#featured#hardware#Internet of Things#IoT#MWCA17#Nokia#sensors#top Small Business Cybersecurity Threats and How to…last_img read more

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The Powerful Beliefs of a Successful Sales Manager

first_imgThere are all kinds of beliefs a sales management or sales leader might hold, some healthy, many more unhealthy. If you want to turn in your best performance, those results will start with your beliefs, your mindset. Here is a good set of beliefs to consider.Everything Is My FaultYou cannot be an effective leader without first accepting that everything is your fault. You are the leader, and that makes you responsible for the people in your charge. It also makes you responsible for the people one level above you on the organizational chart.If your team’s performance isn’t what it should be, you are the one with the authority and responsibility to remedy it. If an individual is negative and infecting others with harmful beliefs, they are only wreaking havoc because you haven’t done anything about it. If you don’t protect your team from negativity, the infection will eventually take hold.If people on your team lack the mindset, skill sets, or tool kits, those things are your responsibility. If they need to improve, you need to improve them (and if you don’t like this group you refuse to develop, I promise you won’t like the next group any better. There is nowhere to hide from your duty as the leader.)You are also responsible for the people to whom you report. If they don’t understand the situation on the ground in your market, you haven’t done an effective job informing them in a way that compels them to act. If your team is missing the things they need, you are the one who has to acquire these things for them. That means persuading the people to whom you report to give you what you need. You are responsible for informing your leadership with what they need to know so that they can help you lead your team effectively.The price of being an effective leader is responsibility. You cannot blame anyone or anything else.I Set and Keep the StandardsOver the last few years, more companies find themselves “opportunity-starved.” They don’t have enough opportunities because their salespeople don’t prospect (or don’t prospect enough, or don’t prospect effectively). Too many of these “non-prospecting,” “alleged” salespeople have spent too much time reading posts on LinkedIn. As a leader, you are responsible for setting and keeping the standards by which your team operates.If the standard is that everyone prepares for sales meetings, believing the gift of time is too important to waste, you will have better meetings with your dream clients and improve how you are perceived. If you leave success to chance, you effectively have no standard. When you allow people to decide for themselves how they will approach both creating and capturing opportunities, the lack of a standard allows people to do less than what is necessary to win.If you think back to the best leader you have ever worked for, one of the first things you will find true is that they required you to raise your standards. They believed you were capable of more than you believed at the time. They didn’t accept mediocrity. They wanted you to be your best and turn in your best performance.If there is going to be a standard, you have to establish and maintain it. If you don’t decide what the standard is, it will be lower than you need it to be by default.We Are All Accountable to Our MissionYour goal or quota does not belong to your company or your leadership. It belongs to you. As the leader, you were given responsibility and resources with which to produce some result. You are accountable for the mission you have accepted. For you to succeed, everyone on your team has to also be responsible for and to the mission.You have to talk about your goals. You have to share why they are important to you, your team, your clients, and your company. You also have to hold people accountable for the outcomes they need to produce to reach those goals. When one person isn’t accountable, very soon, more will follow.The mission cannot belong to you alone. The mission has to be the mission of everyone on your team. You cannot succeed without your team also succeeding.I Must Grow and Develop My TeamThere are sales managers who believe the people that work for them are their employees, something that is technically true, but not the healthiest view of the people in your charge. Instead, you have to believe that they are your team, and you are their leader. The lens through which you view your relationship with your team has an enormous impact on your results.If your people are merely your employees, you have a transactional view of leadership. If they are your team, they are going to be what you build them to be. If you want them to improve their results, you need to first help them improve themselves. If you want them to grow, you have to provide them with the opportunities to do so. You have to provide them with coaching, training, and development. You also have to provide them with your personal attention.Your team is going to play the game as well as you teach and coach them to play it. If everything is your fault, then you are empowered to do what is necessary to make things better. You cannot and need not wait for anyone’s permission to grow and develop your team for you.If your people cannot say that they grew under your leadership, then you will have failed them as a leader.I Set the TempoThere is an old saying that “the speed of the team is the speed of the leader.” You have to set the tempo for your team. Perhaps an example here will help.Maybe you have decided that you need to look at the new opportunities created once a month, not wanting to hold people accountable for creating new opportunities each week. The tempo now suggests new opportunities must be created each month (and maybe based on your long sales cycles and super small market, that might be appropriate, but I am doubtful).Another leader has decided the tempo requires creating new opportunities each week. Their view is that they need to pull opportunities forward in time, and an opportunity acquired this week is better than opportunity acquired seven weeks from now. All things being equal, the leader with the more aggressive operating tempo is going to produce better results than the one who leaves the outcome to chance.Too many leaders offer suggestions, which is to say, they want their people to do something, but are unwilling to hold them accountable. None of this requires you micromanage your team. It does, however, require you to lead and to set standards of performance.What You BelieveYou know that the mindset of the individual on your team matters. The same is true for what you believe about your role as a manager, a leader, and a coach. Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

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4,500 Tech Workers, 1 Mission: Get Democrats Elected

first_imgIt was four months and eight days until the 2018 midterm elections, and Anna Eskamani had not spent a penny to promote her political campaign online.Eskamani, 27, is running to represent Florida’s 47th District in the state Legislature. Like many state-level candidates, she writes her own fundraising emails and manages her own social media accounts. And with her busy schedule on the campaign trail, advertising online is an afterthought.“My budget is zero for it right now,” Eskamani said. “It just hasn’t been necessary.”One recent morning, Eskamani attended an hourlong phone conference with volunteers from a group called Tech for Campaigns, who hoped to change her mind.Dozens of progressive groups are organizing for Democrats in this year’s midterms. But Tech for Campaigns has focused on a particularly challenging assignment: dragging Democratic campaigns into the digital age, before it is too late.In a year and a half of existence, Tech for Campaigns has become a kind of Democratic Geek Squad — a national volunteer network consisting of more than 4,500 tech workers with day jobs at companies like Google, Facebook, Netflix and Airbnb. These volunteers, who include engineers, marketers and data scientists, are matched with Democratic campaigns across the country to provide training on digital skills, such as how to promote themselves on social media, build their email lists and use data analytics to identify potential donors.“What’s at stake if we don’t build a true centralized digital arm is falling further behind the Republicans and continuing to lose ground, the battles on key issues and elections at every level,” said Jessica Alter, a co-founder of the group and a longtime tech executive. “If we don’t start now, it will be too late in 2020.”One of the group’s biggest tasks, Alter said, is persuading candidates to campaign heavily on social media, rather than relying solely on TV ads and printed mailers. Many Democrats running in 2018 are spending a much smaller percentage of their ad budgets on digital ads than their rivals, sometimes as little as 10 percent versus more than 40 percent for Republicans, according to two political consultants with ties to multiple campaigns.Tech for Campaigns has advised Democrats in about 60 races since it started, including Justin Nelson, who is running for attorney general in Texas, and Rob Quist, who was narrowly defeated in a special congressional election in Montana last year. The group plans to work with 200 campaigns by the end of the year, with a special focus on helping state-level candidates like Eskamani, who typically do not have the budgets to hire dedicated digital teams.“We do a lot of things that digital consultants don’t,” Alter said. “The most common question we get asked is, ‘What’s the catch?’”When Alter started contacting campaigns last year, she was shocked at how prosaic their technology was. Some campaign workers spent hours manually copying and pasting voter information into email lists. Others were not using basic social media capabilities, such as call-to-action buttons that can be used to ask followers to sign a petition, attend an event or make a donation.“They have all these really ingrained habits from pre-2016 that are very, very hard to unlearn,” Alter said.Democrats are often thought to be tech-savvy, because the Obama campaigns of 2008 and 2012 were celebrated for their online touch and because much of Silicon Valley backs the party’s candidates. In fact, Alter said, Democrats in congressional and state-level races have been outmatched by their Republican rivals, who benefited from the party’s heavy tech investments during the Obama years and their enthusiastic embrace of targeted ads on platforms like Facebook and Google.“People don’t understand how not far along we are as a party,” Alter said. “Obama was really good at tech, but it never trickled down to a Senate race, let alone the state-level stuff.”In 2016, state and federal Republican campaigns outspent Democratic campaigns 3-1 on Google ads, according to a presentation made to political ad buyers by Google’s election team. From April to July of that year, the period when many campaigns were building their email lists and garnering early support, Republicans outspent Democrats 20-1, according to the presentation, which was obtained by The New York Times. Brad Parscale, the digital marketing executive who developed the Trump campaign’s social media-centric strategy in 2016, has been tapped as his campaign manager for 2020.Democratic officials say they are catching up. The Democratic National Committee hired Raffi Krikorian, a former Uber executive, as its chief technology officer last year. Dan Sena, executive director of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, said that the group’s digital budget had tripled, and that the party was “light-years ahead of where it was” in 2016 because of new investments in its digital capabilities. Democrats are also getting help from outside groups like Higher Ground Labs, which finances startups that build campaign technology.Alter, 38, who sold her startup last year and now works as an entrepreneur-in-residence at the venture capital firm Social Capital, came up with the idea for a tech volunteer network in early 2017, just after President Donald Trump issued his travel ban targeting residents of several Muslim-majority countries.Outraged about the policy, and looking for a way to help, she enlisted Peter Kazanjy and Ian Ferguson, two friends in tech who shared her liberal politics. They agreed that Silicon Valley tech workers would jump at the opportunity to apply their technical skills to campaigns. How different is selling a candidate online, after all, from selling shoes or shaving kits?“This is not rocket science,” Kazanjy said. “Campaigns are online/offline e-commerce plays, where the transaction is a vote.”They sent a Google form to their friends in the tech industry to gauge interest. Within three days, more than 700 people had signed up. The group has since grown to more than 4,500 volunteers, raised more than $100,000 in a crowdfunding campaign, and moved into an office in downtown San Francisco that it shares with a venture capital firm.Nick Hobbs, 29, first heard about Tech for Campaigns while working at Google. Hobbs, who left the company last year, had always been politically active, but Tech for Campaigns gave him a way to channel his efforts into something productive.“Instead of coming home and watching Netflix, we come home and go to work,” said Hobbs, who is helping redesign the campaign website of Elizabeth Thomson, a Democrat running in New Mexico’s 24th District.Other left-wing advocacy groups, such as Swing Left and Indivisible, are helping to recruit volunteers and generate grass-roots support in competitive districts. Tech for Campaigns sees its role as behind-the-scenes amplification. Its work is mostly remote, and volunteers use a Slack channel to coordinate as well as regular calls with campaign officials.The group has not been universally welcomed by the party. It has irked some officials and media consultants, whose turf it is edging in on. And the group’s volunteers have learned to give advice to candidates gently, to avoid coming off as arrogant know-it-alls.“We’re very conscious of Silicon Valley having a savior complex,” Alter said. “We don’t walk in saying, ‘We’re the experts. Let us run your campaign.’”Chris Hurst, a first-time politician who was elected to Virginia’s House of Delegates last November, worked with Tech for Campaigns beginning several months before Election Day. The group redid his website, tweaked his online ads and coordinated a mass texting campaign to get out the vote.In the end, Hurst defeated his Republican opponent by 8 points.“I know, 100 percent, that they made a difference in our campaign,” said Andrew Whitley, Hurst’s campaign manager. “I was very surprised these Silicon Valley folks were willing to donate their time like that.”By the end of the recent conference call, Tech for Campaigns had persuaded Eskamani, the Florida House candidate, to start running ads on her social media accounts. In the coming days, the group said, it would audit her other social media accounts to see which types of posts generated the best engagement and give her tips for increasing their impact.Eskamani gushed with excitement.“I love it,” she said. “Oh, my gosh, so much structure. It’s great.”© 2018 New York Times News Service Related Itemslast_img read more

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Unintended Extras

first_imgA dam in a village 100 kms. from Mumbai was the location for the climax of Rakesh Chaudhary’s film The Eclipse of Taregna. On reaching there early one morning, when a shoot was scheduled with some 50 villagers, his heart sank to find no one.When Joseph Mathew began shooting Bombay Summer in Mumbai, he wanted to work with a small crew. He hired the key people and thought that would be it. But when he turned up on the set the first day, there were more than 100 people.Making a film in India comes with its quirks and eccentricities. One runs the risk of being force-fed in Indian homes, dealing with extraneous crowds on the sets, and perpetually running behind schedule. Yet both these NRI filmmakers went back to India to shoot their projects, and have returned with success stories, a bagful of anecdotes, and, most importantly, lessons that they will remember for future projects.“Working in India comes with its own set of rules. In India everyone brings their own ‘people.’ I’ll keep that in mind the next time,” says Mathew whose 2009 film Bombay Summer won awards for best film, best director and best actress at the MIAAC New York 2009 Film Festival.Chaudhary decided to proceed with the shoot at the dam with his assistants doubling up as extras. “It was a funny incident. I found out from the location manager later that the reason no women or children turned up was because there was a big religious event in town, and all the women had to attend that,” he says.“Making a film in India has taught us patience. We had no choice but to produce on an Indian schedule, not ours,” says Priya Giri Desai, who won a documentary program grant from Sundance Institute recently for her film Match + : Love in the Time of HIV, with Ann S. Kim. She believes that even if it takes longer, it will prove to be valuable for the film in the long run.So, what set these filmmakers on a quest across the shores leaving behind their work and convenient settings in America: curiosity for their homeland, an assuaging sense of familiarity, or a little bit of both?The Indian connectionGiri Desai, whose documentary is about a matchmaker for HIV+ couples, is constantly reading stories from India. She is attracted by stories that are multi-layered and complex and even look contradictory or hypocritical in their details.She came across the story for her movie on the BBC and pointed it out to her associate Ann Kim when they both worked at public television together. She thought it would make a good film years before she actually shot it in India.The San Francisco based filmmaker was born and raised in the United States and grew up visiting her extended family in India every other summer.“Indian culture is so rich, so vast, so old, and so new all at once, that I find myself drawn to them again and again,” she says.Chaudhary, a computer engineer who migrated to the United States in search of a job in 1997, on the other hand, never set out to make anything Indian. His starting point is a theme or a character, and when it comes to providing a setting for it, familiarity brought him to India.His parents lived in Mumbai and he had a strong social network there. “It is a very real possibility that I’ll move back to India at some point. So I wanted to test the waters there.” Chaudhary’s short film is the story of a man and his grandson woven around a solar eclipse in a small town called Taregna.But Joseph Mathew, who considered the very idea of filmmaking preposterous while he was growing up in India, was convinced about setting his debut feature in India.Bombay Summer is the exploration of the friendship between three young people in contemporary Mumbai. “I was fixated about setting it in Bombay. From the time I was a kid, the city has had a mythic hold on my imagination,”Mathew says.But there is much more to a film than just setting it in an Indian city. One dabbles in the milieu of the place and feels a compelling need to capture it fittingly on celluloid.Across culturesNew York-based Mathew says that filmmakers can only approach their subjects with artistic and personal integrity and give it everything they have got. And then viewers decide if justice has been done to the place. He was very comfortable setting his film in contemporary Mumbai even though he settled in the USA in 1994. However, he admits that the city is no longer what he knew it to be as a child.The closed, quasi-socialist country of the 1980s has given way to a different nation. “Whenever I went back over the last 10 years, I was blown away by how quickly the country is changing.” It was not just about new cars, highways and buildings, but the rearrangement of a whole social order. All this was happening in a society that is still fiercely conservative and class and caste conscious, says Mathew.Chaudhary too felt the pinch of a changing India. Things had changed so dramatically in a short span of time that it felt to him like a generational difference. He was astonished at the fact that the average age of his crew was below 30.“But on a macro level, things are deteriorating. People are too busy trying to make it for themselves, and nobody has the time to notice how bad our cities have gotten,” he laments.Giri Desai, unlike Mathew and Chaudhary who have spent considerable parts of their lives in India, had a different set of concerns altogether. She was worried about staying true to the Indian culture without employing stereotypes. She was very conscious of not being a parachute film-maker. “I think curiosity and respect go a long way in ensuring that you don’t just drop into a country and extract a story and leave,” she says.However, all three of them vouch for how difficult and capricious India can be for filmmaking.Incredible India!Giri Desai admits that the pace at which India works is different from America, and one has to respect that. Personal relationships are important in India and it is nearly impossible to work on sensitive stories without spending enough time getting to know people. “It is inherent in Indians to invite you in, feed you, chat with you and ask you questions about your life. We have to be as open as we are asking our subjects to be in some ways,” she says.It took three years for her subjects to open up to her. In several instances, she and her associate brought the camera into a scene and never turned it on, or waited hours before they got the go-ahead. She spent her first three visits to India getting to know people over several cups of South Indian filter coffee.Chaudhary opted for a different path. He moved in with his parents in India to make his film. He had a hard time knocking at producers’ doors to secure financing for his short film and eventually had to produce it himself. However, he maintains that it wouldn’t have been any easier for him in America.Mathew arrived in Mumbai not knowing anyone. From his hotel room, he contacted people who could make the film happen. And when it did, Mathew enumerated the challenges he faced: “Two things happen when you shoot on the streets of Bombay — a crowd forms instantaneously followed by cops who have an uncanny knack for sniffing out a five hundred rupee bill. No getting away from either.”When he rented a camera, it was accompanied by two guys who took care of it. They even had veto power over certain shots they considered “too risky,” he adds.On the other hand, Chaudhary and his crew were adopted quickly by the residents of a chawl they were shooting in, who invited them into their homes and helped them with everything, including providing them with an unlimited supply of extras. The Eclipse of Taregna won the Grand Jury prize for Best Short Film at the International Film Festival of Los Angeles 2011.  Related Itemslast_img read more

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First Kendall, Now Kim; Vogue India Faces Backlash For Featuring Kardashian Sisters

first_imgThis would be the seventh time reality star Kim Kardashian is on the cover of Vogue magazine, and the first time she is the Vogue India cover girl, a news that has not gone down well with many netizens.Vogue shared pictures from the star’s photoshoot on Instagram where the fashion influencer is seen styled by Anaita Shroff Adajania in a beige lehenga with gota work, a red sari dress, a plain gold shimmer number and black satin gown.The 37-year-old celebrity shot for these photos in Los Angeles. Vogue quoted her as saying: “The saris, the jewelry, the clothes—everything was so beautiful! I told my show that we have to figure out how to get to India.” While many praised the photographs and the general look and feel of the dresses she wore, the magazine faced backlash for not featuring a South Asian model instead, just as it did when it featured Kim’s half-sister Kendall on their cover last May.Netizens tweeted:How many cultures can kim k appropriate #vogueindia— phoebe (@phoebe_G) February 27, 2018@VOGUEIndia so basically you wanna create a new generation of bleached head, naked Indian girls? What happened to authenticity? Bad move #VogueIndia you killing the beautiful culture and history of #India— tweetybird (@tweetiibee) February 27, 2018I have nothing against Kim Kardashian but @VOGUEIndia is really doing itself a disservice by continually neglecting to portrait brown women in their “magazine”— you’re perpetuating a detrimental cycle of underrepresentation. Stop white washing your own damn culture.— Aditi Prasad (@P_diti) February 27, 2018so many pretty Indian models out there and Vogue India somehow chooses kendall jenner and kim kardashian for their covers. How hard is it to have Indian women represent Indian culture.— n (@nxvyaa) February 27, 2018I can’t believe @VOGUEIndia featured Kim Kardashian on their cover as if we don’t see her featured on a different magazine every day. India’s vogue should embrace and feature their own south Asian women instead of choosing someone from pop culture— fari (@fariiihaa) February 27, 2018Some of them did post comments in the defense of Vogue and the Kardashian sisters:Why do y’all hate @KimKardashian & her siblings so much? Were you this pressed when Cindy Crawford was featured in 2016?@VOGUEIndia features many beautiful women, mainly from India, as well as other countries every month.🙄 It’s a beautiful cover shoot! #KimKardashian #VogueIndia pic.twitter.com/J57JmOy273— Finéssa Hudgens (@_Cakezz) February 27, 2018Kim in Indian clothes makes me happy 😍😍😍 #VogueIndia pic.twitter.com/ZwREkmiJrr— Nida Hyder (@NiderHyder) February 27, 2018A) Vogue isn’t an NGO, it’s a magazine. It is there to sell and generate sales for the featured brands & companies. B)Vogue India should be obliged to feature an Indian person as much as Vogue U.K. should be obliged to feature a British person. That is, it shouldn’t. #vogueindia— Carol C. (@TeddyGirlCarol) February 27, 2018And this whole appropriating culture thing is getting out of hand. Why can’t a non-Indian wear a lehenga? I’d hope my white friends would like to wear Indian clothes at my wedding one day. #VogueIndia— Nahida Akhtar (@NahidaTAkhtar) February 27, 2018To all those who say Vogue India doesn’t select Indian women as cover girls, please google Vogue India before making a mountain out of a molehill.#VogueIndia #KimKardashian @VOGUEIndia pic.twitter.com/xuJJEbUjUu— JustSaying (@JustMyOpinion65) February 27, 2018When the magazine faced a similar predicament over its decision to feature Kendall Jenner on the cover last year, they released a statement, saying: “In the last 10 years, Vogue India has had only 12 international covers, including Kendall Jenner in 2017. Therefore, statistically, 90% of our covers are Indian! And we are proud of that. India has given the world so many beautiful faces to admire. After all, we are Vogue, an international brand, and we want to give the love back by featuring some of the best international celebrities on our covers. Occasionally!”Kim Kardashian started as a personal assistant to former reality star, Paris Hilton. She told Vogue India in an exclusive interview about the makings of a social media sensation: “I thought I was just going to run my clothing store. I didn’t think [the reality show] would go beyond season 1 or 2. And then as things were happening, my mom and I were so excited. We didn’t even know what we were starting, but we knew we were in it together. We definitely made so many mistakes.”She also gives advice to young women entrepreneurs in the magazine: “Don’t give your name away. Stand your ground on being an owner in your company.” Related ItemsFashionKim Kardashianstylelast_img read more

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India Prepares For Lavish Wedding Estimated To Cost $100 Million

first_imgIndia is preparing for what could be one of the world’s most lavish weddings, a spectacle that could even put the fictional nuptials in “Crazy Rich Asians” to shame.On Wednesday, Asia’s richest man — oil-and-telecom tycoon Mukesh Ambani — is scheduled to give away his daughter Isha to billionaire Ajay Piramal’s son, Anand. There have been a wide range of figures for how much the week-long extravaganza will cost. People familiar with the planning estimated the expense at about $100 million, while a person close to the family said the amount is not more than $15 million. The people asked not to be identified speaking on a private matter.Invitees to the pre-wedding festivities, in the central Indian lake city of Udaipur, range from international and local celebrities such as Beyonce and Shah Rukh Khan, to politicians like Hillary Clinton and business tycoons including Henry Kravis, according to people familiar with the matter. The guest list is so long that the Ambanis and Piramals have taken over at least five five-star hotels nearby, and a war room has been set up in Mumbai to manage logistics, they said. According to local media reports, more than 100 chartered flights will fly guests to and from Udaipur’s Maharana Pratap Airport.As gratitude to the city of Udaipur, the Ambanis donated enough food to feed 5,100 people three meals a day for four days, and set up a bazaar to showcase 108 traditional Indian paintings, pottery and other art from local artisans, according to a statement from a family representative.The main ceremony will be held at the patriarch’s home, the 27-story Antilia palace in Mumbai, and post-wedding events will be held in the city.For the chairman of Reliance Industries Ltd., who overtook Jack Ma this year as Asia’s wealthiest man, Isha will be the first of his children to wed. After the festivities, the newlyweds are poised to move in to their $64-million diamond-themed mansion at the Gulita building in Mumbai, according to one of the people.A spokesperson for Piramal Enterprises Ltd. declined to comment.(c) 2018, Bloomberg Related Itemslast_img read more

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A German Coach Crossing Hurdles to Take Hockey to Rural India

first_imgA hockey turf has been cut into pieces and is being used as doormats and carpets in a Rajasthan village. The turf was brought to village Jatwara in Dausa district of the state from Germany in 2013, when Andrea Thumshirn, a primary league hockey player from the European country, began teaching the sport to children in the village. In a country with hockey as its national game and where sports infrastructure has always been an issue, the use of AstroTurf as door mats has invited national attention.Thumshirn left Rajasthan recently after a three-year stint in the area when she discovered that she was being cheated by the locals, the Hindustan Times reported. The 42-year-old hockey trainer told the publication that she had earlier suffered the same experience in another village in the state.Hockey Village India in RajasthanThe turf in Jatwara was the third one in Rajasthan, with Jaipur and Ajmer being the two places with hockey turfs in the state, the report added.Thumshirn’s foray into training village children in hockey began when she visited Garh Himmat Singh village in 2010 with some German tourists while traveling from Jaipur to Agra. She started Hockey Village India, a non-profit organisation to introduce the sport to children in the rural area. In 2014, she moved to Jatwara after finding out that her local partner was using the funds meant for the children.In Jatwara too, her plans did not fructify since the locals opposed her plans to lay out the turf, she told HT. “They gave a 14-page objection letter too. One of the reasons was that their annual fair was held in the school ground,” said Thumshirn.The turf was then shifted to the house of the Sharma family, who own the school where its pieces are now used as mats. Varsha Sharma, the wife of the school owner, told the publication that the pieces came as samples, a claim that Thumshirn denies, saying there were no samples as the turf was a second-hand one that she got from Germany. “It lay behind their house for a long time. They must have cut the pieces from there,” HT quoted her as saying.Accusations against ThumshirnThumshirn, who enrolled more than 100 boys and girls at the two schools in the Rajasthan villages, was also accused of imposing her Western culture on the local population. She was accused of trying to convert children to Christianity, and plotting to grab land in the village, Economic Times had reported in 2015.“I tried to be not angry,” she said talking to Scroll. “I don’t know if people really understand what they did was wrong. It was a clash of cultures that could not be any bigger,” added Thumshirn, who has now moved to Theralu in Coorg, Karnataka.  Related ItemsAndrea ThumshirnAndrea Thumshirn hockeyAndrea Thumshirn RajasthanGerman Hockey Village IndiaHockey Village IndiaJatwara German coachJatwara Rajasthan hockeyLittle IndiaRajasthan German hockeylast_img read more

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