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Gabriel Martinelli hopes to play alongside Bukayo Saka for many years at Arsenal

first_imgMartinelli has been excellent this season (Picture: Getty)Arsenal are on just their third winning run in the league this season after wins over Southampton and Norwich and take on Wolves on Saturday evening.‘It’s as if we are a family and everyone is united,’ Martinelli said. ‘Everyone chats to everyone and you have players like (Pierre-Emerick) Aubameyang or (Alexandre) Lacazette, who are top footballers, but they’re great people as well.‘Emi Martinez and David Luiz as well. I can’t thank them enough for helping me settle in and I’m grateful to God for this opportunity.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City‘[Mikel Arteta] helped me so much since he took over. As I’ve said before, when the ball is in midfield, I have to shape my body correctly to head towards goal.‘He’s helped me in many areas, so I think he’ll be very important in terms of my development at Arsenal. ‘I hope to contribute with lots of goals, assists, good performances and results for the club.’MORE: Wout Weghorst responds to Arsenal transfer speculationMORE: Mikel Arteta vows to address David Luiz’s ‘weaknesses’ as he hails influence of Arsenal defenderFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. For more stories like this, check our sport page. Advertisement Martinelli and Saka both signed new deals (Picture: Getty)Gabriel Martinelli admitted he was delighted to follow in the footsteps of Bukayo Saka and sign a new long-term deal with Arsenal.Arsenal finally secured the future of Saka this week after months of talks and Gunners fans were given another treat when 19-year-old put pen to paper on a new contract on Friday.Martinelli is hopeful he and 18-year-old Saka can play together at Arsenal for many years to come.He said: ‘Congratulations to Bukayo on his new deal. He’s a fantastic guy who deserves so much. ADVERTISEMENT‘We chat and have a laugh together every day, so hopefully we can enjoy plenty of success going forward with Arsenal.’AdvertisementAdvertisementMartinelli and Saka have been two bright sparks in another frustrating season for Arsenal, but the Brazilian striker said the squad remain united. Comment Coral BarrySaturday 4 Jul 2020 2:18 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link814Shares Advertisement Gabriel Martinelli hopes to play alongside Bukayo Saka for many years at Arsenallast_img read more

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Governor Wolf to Examine Overhaul of Pennsylvania’s Professional Licensing System

first_imgGovernor Wolf to Examine Overhaul of Pennsylvania’s Professional Licensing System Efficiency,  Government That Works,  Jobs That Pay,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf has signed an executive order to begin a review of the commonwealth’s professional licenses to benchmark Pennsylvania’s licensing requirements against national and regional averages. The review will ensure that professional licenses are free from unnecessary barriers to opportunity from excessive licensing requirements, fees and policies that unnecessarily block hardworking Pennsylvanians from the career of their choice, while also protecting against public harm.“Requiring a license to work in certain jobs helps to keep all of us safe, but those requirements should be fair relative to other states in our region and across the country,” said Governor Tom Wolf. “Overly burdensome requirements and fees can block some workers – especially minorities or spouses in military families who move frequently – from starting a career and supporting their families.”“With this executive order, I am tasking the Commissioner of the Bureau of Professional and Occupational Affairs within the Pennsylvania Department of State. The commissioner will work with the various licensing boards and commissions to give them the tools they need to more efficiently regulate their industry.”The commissioner will partner with the 29 boards and commissions in Pennsylvania to study each board’s licensing process, fees, training and continuing education requirements. The commissioners will prepare a report comparing Pennsylvania’s requirements with other states in our region and across the nation and include any reciprocity agreements with other states.The Bureau of Professional and Occupational Affairs within the Pennsylvania Department of State provides administrative and legal support to professional and occupational licensing boards and commissions. Approximately 20 percent of Pennsylvania workers need a license to do their job. The share of workers with an occupational license has grown rapidly since the 1950s.“We need to find the right balances in our licensing requirements so talented and skilled workers can do their jobs and support our economy as we continue to attract business to Pennsylvania and develop a strong workforce,” said Governor Wolf. “Looking for ways to modernize our licensing process for workers is an important part of that process.”The boards and commissions included in the executive order are the State Board of Accountancy, the State Architects Licensure Board, the State Board of Auctioneer Examiners, the State Board of Barber Examiners, the State Board of Certified Real Estate Appraisers, the State Board of Chiropractic, the State Board of Cosmetology, the State Board of Crane Operators, the State Board of Dentistry, the State Board for Professional Engineers, Land Surveyors, and Geologists, the State Board of Funeral Directors, the State Board of Landscape Architects, the State Board of Massage Therapy, the State Board of Medicine, the State Board of Nursing, the State Board of Nursing Home Administrators, the State Board of Occupational Therapy, the State Board of Optometry, the State Board of Osteopathic Medicine, the State Board of Pharmacy, the State Board of Physical Therapy, the State Board of Podiatry, the State Board of Psychology, the State Board of Social Workers, Marriage and Family Therapists, and Professional Counselors, the State Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, the State Board of Vehicle Manufacturers, Dealers, and Salespersons, the Navigation Commission, and the Real Estate Commission.The commissioner’s findings will be submitted to the governor within seven months from the effective date of the order. October 25, 2017center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Ireland line up Georgia friendly

first_img Ireland, who travel to Sweden and then host Austria later this month in a double-header which could go a long way to determining their fate, will hope to head into the summer having taken a maximum six points from the Faroes following a 4-1 win in Torshavn in October – four days after their 6-1 humiliation at the hands of Germany. Press Association Ireland will face Georgia in a friendly in Dublin as they prepare for their World Cup qualifier against the Faroe Islands in June.center_img The Georgians will head for the Aviva Stadium on June 2, four days after Giovanni Trapattoni’s men play England at Wembley. Trapattoni will use the fixture to finalise his preparations for the home game against the Faroes on June 7. last_img read more

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Moyes welcomes Mourinho mind games

first_img However, Van Persie then admitted he had not spoken to Fabregas about the situation, which has become more complicated due to the decision of Tito Vilanova to stand down as Barcelona manager because of ongoing cancer treatment. Introduced for the final half hour of his first pre-season appearance, Van Persie wasted no time in showing the goalscoring prowess that brought him back-to-back Golden Boot trophies, wrapping up a comfortable victory for Moyes’ men. Goalscoring honours went to Jesse Lingard and Danny Welbeck though. Lingard had the honour of scoring the first goal of Moyes’ reign and the 20-year-old from Warrington added another after half-time. Welbeck matched his fellow academy graduate, making a handy contribution given he only found the net on two occasions last season. David Moyes has no worries about engaging in a mind games battle with Jose Mourinho. It has seemed the Chelsea boss has been trying to get under Moyes’ skin over the last few days, particularly with his comments about Wayne Rooney. Moyes has not been drawn in. But he does find the prospect quite intriguing. And, answering a question from a fellow Scot in the aftermath of Manchester United’s 5-1 win over the A League All Stars in Sydney on Saturday, Moyes showed no sign of being overwhelmed by Mourinho’s approach. “It sounds like your accent’s like mine and if you’re from Glasgow then you enjoy those sorts of things, so bring it on,” said Moyes. It is a sign the intense former Everton boss is feeling more comfortable in his new surroundings. His first major signing continues to prove elusive though, with Moyes admitting there had been no developments on attempts to bring in reinforcements, even though executive vice-chairman Ed Woodward returned home three days early on “urgent transfer business”. “I’ve not had any more news since we last spoke yesterday,” said Moyes. “I have no more updates so I couldn’t give you anything positive or negative.” Robin van Persie would like to see Cesc Fabregas come to United though. Asked by host broadcaster Channel Seven immediately after the game whether it would be a good thing to be reunited with his former captain at Arsenal, the Dutchman replied: “Of course, he’s a great player.” Press Associationlast_img read more

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Update on the latest sports

first_imgBritish Senior Open postponedUNDATED (AP) — The Senior British Open has been postponed amid the coronavirus outbreak, but organizers are still hoping the last senior major of the year can be played in 2020.The event, due to take place at Sunningdale from July 23-26, is the fourth of the five senior majors to lose its scheduled place on the calendar because of the pandemic. R&A official Johnnie Cole-Hamilton says organizers are looking at alternative options to host the tournament “later in the year if at all possible.”Word of the postponement comes a week after the regular British Open was called off for the first time since 1945. It’s been moved to next July so it can still be held at Royal St. George’s.The Senior PGA Championship and the U.S. Senior Open have been canceled, while the Regions Tradition has been rescheduled for Sept. 24-27 from early May. The Senior Players Championship, scheduled for Firestone Country Club in Ohio from July 9-12, hasn’t been called off yet. April 14, 2020 Associated Press Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditWhatsappNASCAR-LARSON FIREDLarson fired over slurCHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Kyle Larson has been fired by Chip Ganassi Racing, a day after nearly every one of his sponsors dropped the star driver for using a racial slur during a live stream of a virtual race. In other developments related to the coronavirus pandemic:— The Tour de France won’t begin as planned because French President Emmanuel Macron (eh-mahn-yoo-EHL’ mah-KROHN’) has canceled all public events with large crowds through mid-July in response to the coronavirus pandemic. Tour organizers say it is now impossible for the three-week race to start on June 27 in the Riviera city of Nice as scheduled. It is unclear if cycling’s biggest event will be scrapped from the race calendar. New plans are likely to be announced before the end of the month following consultations with the governing body of cycling.— The NHL will remain on pause through at least the end of the month. The league on Tuesday announced it was extending its self-quarantine recommendation for players, coaches and staff through April 30. The announcement marks the third time the NHL has pushed back its timetable since suspending play on March 12 because of the new coronavirus. The most recent self-quarantine recommendation was supposed to run through Wednesday. The recommendation means team facilities will remain closed to players. There is no timetable of when play might resume and whether the NHL will be able to complete the regular season or start the playoffs, which could stretch into September. There were 189 games remaining when play was suspended.— Major League Baseball is moving its annual celebration of Jackie Robinson online because of the delay in the season caused by the new coronavirus. The Jackie Robinson Foundation is launching a virtual learning hub to coincide with tomorrow’s 73rd anniversary of Robinson breaking the major league color barrier. CC Sabathia (suh-BATH’-ee-uh) and Harold Reynolds are among the former major leaguers reading excerpts from the book by his daughter, Sharon. The MLB Network and MLB.com will feature Robinson-related programming.— Tokyo organizers say they have no “PlanB” for the Olympics if they need to be postponed again. They say they are proceeding under the assumption the Olympics will open on July 23, 2021. That date was set last month by the IOC and Japanese officials after the spreading coronavirus pandemic made it clear the Olympics could not be held as scheduled.center_img Larson was in his seventh Cup season with Ganassi and had been prepping to test free agency for the first time. Just weeks ago, the 27-year-old was considered the top free agent in NASCAR. Now he is out of a job in what could ultimately be an eight-figure blunder.The unraveling began Sunday night when Larson was competing in one of the iRacing virtual events drivers are playing during the sports stoppage caused by the coronavirus pandemic. Larson appeared to lose communication on his headset with his spotter. During a check of his microphone, he asked his spotter, “You can’t hear me?” That was followed by the N-word. The slur from Larson was directed at his spotter, who is white.He was suspended without pay by Ganassi early Monday, then suspended indefinitely by NASCAR and Larson, who is half Japanese, was ordered to complete a sensitivity training. But his entire program fell apart as primary sponsors McDonalds and Credit One Bank pulled their funding from Larson. Chevrolet suspended its relationship with him, and all but one commercial partner denounced Larson’s comment and indicated they were ending their relationship.Ganassi says it decided to end its relationship with Larson when “it became obvious that this was the only appropriate course of action to take.” It called Larson’s comments “offensive and unacceptable especially given the values of our organization.”VIRUS OUTBREAK-SPORTS Update on the latest sports — The mother of Minnesota Timberwolves center Karl-Anthony Towns has died due to complications from COVID-19. Jacqueline Cruz-Towns had been fighting the virus for more than a month. The native of the Dominican Republic was a fixture at Timberwolves games from the start of her son’s NBA career in 2015. Karl Towns Sr., the father of the two-time All-Star, was also hospitalized with the virus but has since recovered.— Houston Rockets star Russell Westbrook has donated 650 computers to children in need so they can continue learning with schools shut down because of the new coronavirus. Westbrook’s Why Not? Foundation teamed with Comp-U-Dopt and Houston mayor Sylvester Turner’s office of education to provide computers to underprivileged children across the city.— A sporting goods manufacturer in Rhode Island went looking for other products it could produce when sports shut down. Protective pad maker G-Force retrofitted its factory to turn out face shields for medical workers. It is joining with some neighboring companies to pump out 10,000 per day and they are hoping to double that by the end of this week. G-Force CEO Glen Giovanucci is a former Northeastern hockey player and assistant coach. He says the effort has saved at least 80 jobs. But it also has the benefit of helping to do something about the coronavirus crisis.last_img read more

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World Test Championship progressing as planned, says ICC

first_imgTHE fate of the T20 World Cup out of the way, the ICC’s attention now turns to the World Test Championship (WTC) and in particular, the six Test series postponed because of the Covid-19 pandemic. Progress will not be quick, cautioned the ICC, but for now, matters are proceeding as planned.The very first WTC was due to be completed by the end of March 2021, each of the nine sides having played six series home and away over a two-year period. The top two sides would then play a final, planned for next summer in the UK. But that schedule has been thrown into disarray because of the impact of the pandemic, and only now are members working out ways with the ICC to reschedule their commitments.Priority at the moment is on the six series already postponed: Sri Lanka vs England, one Test between Pakistan and Bangladesh, Bangladesh vs Australia, West Indies vs South Africa, Sri Lanka vs Bangladesh and Bangladesh vs New Zealand.“We’re in discussions with the members now with rescheduling of the series that have been postponed to date,” Geoff Allardice, the ICC’s general manager cricket operations, said.“With the English summer looking like getting both the Test series through, the next ones I know there’s been some talk in the media about West Indies v South Africa are looking to find a suitable time. But outside that series, the next scheduled ones are in late November in New Zealand. So, the focus will come back on the six postponed series and when they might be able to be replayed.“With some of them, discussions are underway but we’re in the process of getting updates from all member countries as to what they’re looking at. At the moment, everything is proceeding as planned. The series on in England right now are part of the WTC and all of the series that have been identified will be part of the Championships. It’s about getting a feel for whether they can all be completed within the competition window ending in March next year.”But given the fluid nature of the impacts of the pandemic – with some countries still to reach a peak and others experiencing, or on the verge of, an expected second wave – decisions won’t be taken quickly. Unlike with the T20 World Cup, which was eventually postponed earlier this month, there isn’t a pressing need for a cut-off date by which decisions need to be taken.“In the last few months, we’ve learned that things change quite quickly,” Allardice said. “One week you think that you’re not going to play for a while and then things begin to open up at a government level and then all of a sudden, things look possible.“A lot of the series we are talking about, if we are saying November-December, January-February, they are six to eight months away and it’s still hard to predict where things will be in some countries that far out. We haven’t got a firm drop-dead date in mind. We are going to get a feel in the next month or two from member countries about when they’ll be able to resume and what their upcoming seasons look like, including the matches and series they need to reschedule that have been postponed.”The next cycle of international cricket could also see efforts made to include an international T20 league in the calendar. The idea was discussed during the planning stages for this cycle but the constraints of the existing FTP meant it went no further.“It was something that was discussed at length and continues to be talked about in terms of how do you achieve it practically,” Allardice said. “What is the right number of teams, the format of the competition? Sometimes you couple ODIs series with Tests series, so how do you do something different without making the league the same number of teams against the same opponents but in T20Is as well?“Ideally you’d like to incorporate more teams in a Twenty20 structure. Given the constraints of the FTP we were looking at a few years ago, it was a bridge too far then but that doesn’t mean it won’t be on the things we’re trying to achieve in the next calendar.” (ESPN Cricinfo).last_img read more

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Syracuse hires Acosta as tight ends coach, announces McDonald will also coach wide receivers

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on February 20, 2014 at 3:01 pm Contact Stephen: sebail01@syr.edu | @Stephen_Bailey1 Syracuse has hired Bobby Acosta as tight ends coach to complete the 2014 staff, SU Athletics announced in a release Thursday.The Orange elected to hire Acosta instead of a wide receivers coach after Rob Moore left for the Buffalo Bills on Feb. 6. Offensive coordinator and associate head coach George McDonald will take over that position after coaching the tight ends last season.Acosta becomes the first exclusive tight ends coach since at least the 2009-10 season.“I am so excited to be part of the Syracuse football family and the amazing tradition of Orange football,” Acosta said in a statement. “Coach (Scott) Shafer is a dynamic person, coach and mentor. His program has a family atmosphere where the student-athletes are loved. When you have that, it leads to success.”Acosta brings 15 years of coaching experience, most recently serving as the head coach at Widener last season. Before that, he worked as the offensive coordinator at The College of New Jersey from 2008-12, also coaching the receivers and tight ends.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“Bobby is an extremely intelligent coach who understands east coast football and recruiting,” Shafer said in a statement. “He has done an exemplary job developing a relationship with the coaches in New Jersey throughout his career. We welcome Bobby and (his wife) Alicia to the Syracuse family.” Commentslast_img read more

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Syracuse uses 7 home runs to power doubleheader sweep of Virginia

first_img Published on April 25, 2015 at 7:01 pm Contact Sam: sjfortie@syr.edu | @Sam4TR Corinne Ozanne bat-flipped.“Yeah, I pimped it a little bit,” she said. “If you know it’s gone…then you better let everyone else know it’s gone, too.”Ozanne had just crushed the pitch to left-center field in the fourth inning, the ball clearing the netting and one of the trees beyond the outfield wall.As Ozanne jumped on home plate, she gave her team a one-run lead it wouldn’t relinquish and received pounds on the helmet from teammates.Syracuse (19-26, 3-13 Atlantic Coast) exploded offensively Saturday at SU Softball Stadium, hitting seven home runs while pushing 21 runs across the plate total in two wins over Virginia (16-39, 4-19). Ozanne’s home run was the team’s third of game two and her first of two homers on the afternoon. The Orange defeated the Cavaliers 7-4 in game one and 14-9 in game two.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“(Hitting) is contagious,” SU head coach Leigh Ross said. “I know it sounds cliché, but it’s true.”The Orange began game two by hitting. In the top of the first, center fielder Maddi Doane lined a shot through the right-side hole, and Ozanne got hit by a pitch. With two out and two on, catcher Julie Wambold emphatically opened the scoring with a blast to right-center field which hit the top of the netting.First baseman Sydney O’Hara made an error in the top of the third, which extended the inning and allowed Virginia to tie the game.“Coach always says, ‘Let the mistakes go and stay positive,’” O’Hara said. “I knew I messed up…It’s going to happen, so I focused on my at bat.”O’Hara came right back and righted her mistake in the bottom of the frame by smashing a two-run single through the right side, giving the Orange a 5-3 advantage.But after SU squandered a bases loaded opportunity in the bottom of the third inning, Orange pitcher Lindsey Larkin gave Virginia its first lead, a 7-5 advantage in the fourth. It only served as a prelude to Ozanne’s “pimped” home run and another homer from Doane.“(Doane) came unglued on that swing,” Ross said. “Everyone swings more freely (when you’re hitting). It’s helpful.”In the bottom of the fifth, the homers kept coming.Third baseman Danielle Chitkowski hit a home run which cleared the net and the trees beyond the outfield wall. The Virginia center fielder chased the ball for two steps, then stopped and watched as it sailed out of sight.Later that inning, Doane crushed a 1-0 pitch deep to right field. She high-fived Ross rounding third, pumped her fist and jumped into a mob of teammates at home plate.After a Sammy Fernandez single, Ozanne walloped a 3-2 pitch for a home run deep to center field. The ball hit the netting beyond the outfield fence three seconds after it was hit.A slugfest had turned into a blowout.“It’s wonderful to see (everyone hitting),” Ozanne said. “We’re just hitting the ball and putting runs on the board.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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For Badgers, Bemidji State followed by break

first_imgWisconsin women’s hockey has lived up to expectations yet again in 2011. There were high hopes before the season for a program coming off its fourth national championship in six seasons, and the Badgers haven’t disappointed.UW enters its last series before winter break with a 17-1 overall record, its only blemish an early season loss to Minnesota.“I think we have done really well so far [this season],” junior defender Stefanie McKeough said. “We have had a lot of young players get a lot of experience through that first hard month. We kind of threw them into the lion’s den, so I think they have definitely learned a lot from that and gotten into our systems. We have had a lot of success.”The Badgers look to continue their success on the road at Bemidji, Minn., this weekend. Wisconsin has faced weaker opponents in the past month, but will face a more difficult test in the Bemidji State Beavers (10-5-2) on Friday and Saturday afternoon.“I think they are a really well-coached team. They really play well into their systems,” McKeough said. “We kind of refer to them as some type of gnat or something. They are always on you; you just can’t get them off no matter how hard you try. I think they have a really good goaltender too; she is really big. And they block a lot of shots too, so I think you find success whenever you run into a hot goalie.”Bemidji State goaltender Zuzana Tomcikova has helped the Beavers find success behind her .933 save percentage and 433 saves this season. UW forward Brooke Ammerman has been facing the senior goalie from Bratislava, Slovakia, for four seasons now. Ammerman said Tomcikova has been “phenomenal” since the first time they played freshman year, and that she has been a large contributor to the Beavers’ success this season.With winter break and finals approaching, the Badgers can’t overlook Bemidji State. They also will not play any games for nearly a month. For teams riding high on momentum and playing cohesively, a break from action can sometimes be problematic. Wisconsin’s first series back is at Minnesota, so the team will need to be playing its best hockey. But these Badgers have been in this situation before and know how to handle a long break from action.“I think we are used to it because players have been here,” Ammerman said. “It’s a nice break, everybody deserves a little time off, but it’s not that long so we will be alright.”McKeough believes this weekend’s series is important because a victory would be beneficial in carrying momentum over the break into the Minnesota series in early January.“I definitely think the momentum will carry through into our series against Minnesota if we get two wins, especially because we will be missing a few players,” McKeough said. “It will be a really big confidence boost if we sweep Bemidji especially because they have split [series] with a few ranked teams.”Veterans like McKeough and Ammerman will be important for leading the team by example in these situations. They know the importance of the Bemidji series and its role in preparing them to play Minnesota in a few weeks. But head coach Mark Johnson works his players hard and always has them prepared for their opponents.“I think our work ethic has been great in every game we have played,” Ammerman said. “We have had a chance to win all of them and were able to win most of them, so I think work ethic will carry us though the second half of the year.”last_img read more

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Syracuse’s ‘numbers guy’ Mike Bosch has built up SU’s program from scratch

first_img Published on April 30, 2018 at 10:45 pm Contact Michael: mmcclear@syr.edu | @MikeJMcCleary Facebook Twitter Google+ Syracuse head coach Mike Bosch arrived through the front door of Manley Field House at 8:39 a.m. on Tuesday, March 27. He wasn’t supposed to arrive until 9 a.m., but in a windbreaker with a block Syracuse “S” on the right side of his jacket, the third-year head coach entered the room and looked around, slightly confused.“You’re early,” Bosch quipped to a coworker he was supposed to meet that morning. “Well … I’m early.”He opened the door to his small office, which was decorated with portraits of former players at the two schools he has called his coaching homes. He walked along the right side of the small room to reach his desk situated in the back left corner.The work day began at about 8:46 a.m.“I’m usually ready to go by this time anyway,” Bosch said.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIt was Bosch in a nutshell: He’s quirky, relies on numbers and most of all, loves to work. A head softball coach and mathematics professor at Iowa Lakes Community College for 13 years, Bosch had to balance two full-time jobs. The experience helped as he moved on to the Division-I ranks at Syracuse and was named interim and then head coach, less than three years after his arrival.In his three years as the head coach at Syracuse, the program’s record has improved with each season.  His modern, “moneyball”-like style focuses heavily on statistics. Numbers helped lift the Orange to just its sixth 30-win season in the program’s history. If SU wins one of its final two games, it would be the first Orange team since 2011 to record 30 wins in consecutive seasons.Bosch in the preseason tries not to set a mark to hit, instead letting the individual season’s numbers dictate the daily functions of the program. The core of his success comes from his players, he said, and his goal is to get the best out of them so he can log it in the scoresheet.“I’ve never played a game,” Bosch said. “I am 0-0 as far as playing in college softball. So my players have gotten all the wins for me, and I give them all the credit.”Kevin Camelo | Digital Design Editor***Bosch doesn’t stop working. He said some days at Iowa Lakes, he taught a class early in the day, then handled some coaching duties in the middle of the day before teaching more.“He was used to doing everything around (Iowa Lakes),” said Troy Larson, the school’s athletic director.At Iowa Lakes, an essential part of his job was recruiting. Larson said Bosch’s days would sometimes last 14 hours due to his surplus of responsibilities.His workday never fully ended. Even at high school football games, which were popular social events in the small community, Larson said Bosch frequently stepped away from conversations to take phone calls from potential recruits.When Bosch took over the program, Larson said, the team was consistently finishing seasons with records below .500. Within a few years, Bosch turned the program into a national championship contender.“We’re off the beaten path,” Larson said. “Don’t get me wrong, I love this place. But it’s not like it’s easy to do what he did here.”Courtesy of SU AthleticsFrom the moment Bosch arrived, his eagerness to improve the program showed. To play quality opponents, the team needed to travel, Larson said. He described a mock road trip in which the team would travel five hours south and play three or four games before arriving to a hotel at about midnight. They’d then sleep six or seven hours and drive to play a few more games before returning home near 3 a.m.Larson said there are about 10 eligible bus drivers for Iowa Lakes and, when the spring season came around, most were farmers and busy with work. So Bosch obtained his commercial driver’s license and drove himself.“I’m sure he travels a lot better in Syracuse,” Larson said, laughing.Bosch’s recruiting skills and heavy workload came in handy when he arrived at Syracuse. Initially a pitching coach for the Orange, he left for a year to become National Softball Director at Frozen Ropes, a baseball and softball training facility — which he admitted he took because it paid well. After a year, Bosch was rehired at Syracuse as an assistant coach.After the 2014 season, he was summoned into the office of Pete Sala, SU’s vice president and chief facilities officer, and the interim athletic director at the time.Leigh Ross, who had been head coach of the Orange for the past nine years, decided to leave her job without any warning to Bosch, he said, and the rest of her staff left along with her. Bosch was the only remaining staff member, and Sala wanted to name him as the interim head coach.“I was kind of shocked a little bit,” Bosch said. “I came in and chatted with (Sala), and he said, ‘Here’s what’s happening, and here’s what we’d like you to do.’ And, I was like, ‘Okay. Let’s go.’”From there, the program was Bosch’s to build. He said he had two priorities: recruiting and hiring a staff. With much of the focus that summer on getting new players, the coach had to do all of his hiring over the phone, and fast, bringing on his assistants in less than a week, he said. Alisa Goler, who was part of Bosch’s original staff at SU and is now the associate head coach with the team, said she only met Bosch once before the season started — to sign her contract when she became an SU employee.Bosch remains a primary recruiter for SU, and he said the summer stands alone in terms of heavy workloads. But that was nothing new.“You learn how to have a long day and work,” Bosch said. “I just don’t know how to kind of stop. I have to learn sometimes how to stop myself from overworking. I don’t want to say overworking, just continually not putting things away and stopping from having a … I guess real life. Is that it?”***Bosch called himself a “numbers guy.”“He was probably one of the best math instructors that we’ve had at the college,” Larson said. “We were just as sad to see him go as a math teacher as we were as a coach.”Bosch’s mathematics background sometimes shows in his coaching. The third-year head coach often uses mathematical equations to evaluate and explain parts of the season — including equating season-long trends to sine and cosine graphs — which is often so confusing it causes players to burst into laughter.“He has to know that I don’t understand it,” junior outfielder Alicia Hansen said. “Everyone usually looks at me. Everyone else knows I don’t.”Beyond that, Bosch creates and calculates his own statistics. He said there’s a number for how fast players run, throw overhand or underhand and swing the bat. Among other things he calculated: averages against left- or right-handers, and, Hansen said, he keeps track of a players average with an 0-2 count — things that otherwise wouldn’t show up in the stat sheet.“That’s the way my brain works: A=B, B=C,” Bosch said. “Stats never lie.”The strategies have translated to where he places players, often repositioning faster players to zones where the batter frequently hits.While the numbers don’t resonate with players as often, Bosch often uses analogies to teach his players over the course of a season. Before this spring, Hansen said he cut the bottom out of a cup and filled it with 50 M&M’s, using his hand at the bottom to prevent them from falling. He removed his hand, causing the candies to tumble out, emulating how quickly the team’s 50 games would eventually pass.Hansen said there are “at least 10” analogies that he’s used this season. For Bosch, there is always a number to back things up, his players said. Everything has a rationale.Courtesy of SU AthleticsThis season, Bosch brought in a toy truck to an SU practice. He called it the “opportunity truck.” Throughout the season, Bosch would drive the remote-controlled truck around the field and bump it into a player of his choosing. The routine is embraced by players, who find humor in it, but Bosch ensures there is a meaning behind it.Hansen said if you get hit by the truck, that’s your one opportunity. You can either take it or leave it. On April 28 — Senior Day at Syracuse Softball Stadium — the truck hit outfielder Rachel Burkhardt.With the game scoreless in the bottom of the seventh inning, the senior, in front of her entire immediate family, walked to the plate.“She got her opportunity,” senior Sammy Fernandez said.With a swing of the bat, Burkhardt launched the ball over the centerfield fence, a walk-off home run. As she rounded the bases, she covered her face, shielding tears and masking a look of awe. The “opportunity truck” had chosen her, and she seized it.***Back in his office in Manley Field House, Bosch rose from his chair and pointed out pictures on the left side of his office, all memorabilia from his time at Iowa Lakes.He noticed one in particular, and a slight smile crossed his face as he pointed in the direction of the plaque, honoring his former player’s achievements.“She’s a mom,” he said. “She’s a mom … That’s how you know you’re old, when your players have kids.”He pointed out a few more and told short stories as he went down the line before he arrived at the plaque he received after his 500th win as a head coach. Syracuse’s April 4 doubleheader sweep of Canisius would mark 600 wins of Bosch’s as a head softball coach.“Thirty to 40 wins is a good benchmark for a good season,” Bosch said in his office. “To win 600 games, you’d have to win 30 games for 20 years.”He paused. “Twenty years,” he said. “That’s how you know you’ve been in this for a long time.”Bosch sat back in his chair. Just three years into his SU career, the coach has big aspirations for Syracuse and will stop at nothing to provide his team the ultimate goal: a national championship. He dug his pen into a piece of paper on his desk and got back to work. Commentslast_img read more

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