Tag: 阿拉后花园 上海

Eric Hall: Former football agent dies aged 73 | Football News

first_imgHall, believed to have suffered with underlying health issues, died peacefully with his nephew Michael by his side. Eric Hall worked closely alongside former England boss Terry VenablesImage:Hall worked closely alongside former England boss Terry Venables He also represented former England manager Terry Venables.- Advertisement – Former football agent and music promoter Eric Hall has died aged 73 after a short battle with coronavirus.Hall, often spotted with a cigar and using his catchphrase ‘monster monster’, began his career in the music industry as a record promoter and worked with the likes of Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, Marc Bolan, the Sex Pistols and Queen.- Advertisement – Lord Alan Sugar led tributes on Monday, posting on Twitter: “Football agent Eric Hall has passed away. He was a real character RIP.”Former Liverpool and Tottenham striker Paul Walsh added: “Very sad to hear of the passing of monster monster Eric Hall a real character. My thoughts are with the family, a monster RIP to Eric.” Former footballer agent Eric Hall has passed away Image:Hall was often spotted with a cigar and using his catchphrase ‘monster monster’ He then returned to his original passion of music and up until his death, worked as a radio presenter on a weekly show playing classic hits from the 1950s and 1960s.- Advertisement – He then got his break in football after a chance meeting with former Tottenham player Steve Perryman and went on to represent some of the biggest names in the early years of the Premier League.Players on his books included Dennis Wise, Tim Sherwood, Paul Walsh, John Fashanu and Neil ‘Razor’ Ruddock. – Advertisement – Football agent Eric Hall has passed away. He was a real character R.I.P.— Lord Sugar (@Lord_Sugar) November 16, 2020 As a football agent, Hall claimed to have secured the first-ever goals and appearance bonuses for players – even securing a goal bonus for Newcastle United goalkeeper Dave Beasant.In 1997, he was forced to take six months off work after contracting E.coli and that put an end to his career in football.last_img read more

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There are three things that every DIY painter is probably doing wrong

first_imgMeticulous Finishes, who run painting training workshops, will be showcasing at the Home Show, proudly supported by The Sunday Mail, running from September 8 to 10 at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre.THERE are three main things you’ve probably done wrong if you’ve ever attempted to paint your own home.Meticulous Finishes director Mark Moko, who will be displaying at the Home Show later this week, said do-it-yourself homeowners often needed some help to get their painting job right.His painting company not only offers full painting services, but also a tailor-made training program to help clients who are more hands on.Mr Moko said that to start with, many people often purchased the wrong paint, tools or materials.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor1 hour ago“They also get it wrong when identifying and working with hazardous substrates and house materials, for example, lead based paint and asbestos,” he said.“And the pre-paint preparation and top coat application systems,” also are an issue Mr Moko said.Meticulous Finishes holds tailor-made training workshops for half or full day sessions.Mr Moko said Home Show attendees can get their training package for a discounted price of $1,999 for one full day.“Examples of situations where clients would use the full day training is for a full house exterior or interior repaint,” he said.“They would use a half day training session for repair and repainting a water damaged ceiling or wall, repainting a couple of rooms, resorting and preserving a timber deck, repainting a roof, fence, handrail or the front section of a house.”The Home Show, proudly supported by The Sunday Mail, runs from September 8 — 10 at the Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre.last_img read more

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Bills give punter Vedvik the boot, sign Lachlan Edwards

first_img Punter and kicker Kaare Vedvik got the boot again, this time by the Buffalo Bills.The once-promising player from Norway has now been traded once and cut four times in just over a calendar year after being released by the Bills on Wednesday. Buffalo used the open roster spot to sign Australian-born punter Lachlan Edwards, who spent the previous four seasons with the New York Jets.For Vedvik, his departure from Buffalo comes after being signed to a reserve/future contract in January. Vedvik’s value a year ago was so high, the Baltimore Ravens acquired a fifth-round draft pick in trading him to Minnesota .Vedvik lasted three weeks before being cut by the Vikings, and then signed with the New York Jets. He was then abruptly cut by the Jets after missing an extra point and 45-yard field-goal attempt in their season-opening 17-16 loss to Buffalo. He then closed the season on Cincinnati’s practice squad.Vedvik showed promise as both a punter and kicker during his college career at Marshall. He earned Conference-USA first-team honors in 2017, during which his 92-yard punt was the seventh-longest in college football history, and longest since Ray Guy’s 93-yarder in 1972.Edwards will compete for the punting duties with Corey Bojorquez, who is attempting to return for a third season in Buffalo. Edwards averaged 45 1/2 yards on 338 punts, with 108 of them landing inside the opponents’ 20 in 64 games.Image credits: AP COMMENT FOLLOW US LIVE TV First Published: 20th August, 2020 08:25 IST Written Bycenter_img SUBSCRIBE TO US Associated Press Television News Last Updated: 20th August, 2020 08:25 IST Bills Give Punter Vedvik The Boot, Sign Lachlan Edwards The once-promising player from Norway has now been traded once and cut four times in just over a calendar year after being released by the Bills on Wednesday. Buffalo used the open roster spot to sign Australian-born punter Lachlan Edwards, who spent the previous four seasons with the New York Jets WATCH US LIVElast_img read more

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After More Than 1,090 Days, Shelter’s Longtime Resident Finds a Home

first_imgA black-and-white terrier mix with a shiny coat, Jules knows commands like “sit” and “paw.” She loves to go for walks or runs on her leash and wears a bright pink collar. She loves belly rubs and has a contagious smile. She sometimes barks out of excitement but is very friendly. The pup had been involved in theShare-A-Pet program at the facility,which allows donors to take her onwalks, feed her treats and give herattention. These social interactionsopened her up and readied her foradoption, the shelter states. According to the shelter there is a $165 fee to adopt large, mixed-breed dogs which includes spaying/ neutering, updated vaccinations and microchips. A $350 fee is imposed when adopting puppies and might require adopters to sign up for puppy training classes. The fee for adopting felines is $75 for kittens and $50 for adult cats, which also includes spaying/neutering, updated vaccinations and microchips. “There’s too many animals whodon’t have homes or families tolive with,” said Delfino Salazar,a shelter employee since 2010.“These dogs need family, love.” TINTON FALLS – Things werelooking a bit dismal for a 6-year-oldterrier mix named Shanice. Nov. 2marked her third year in a TintonFalls-based animal shelter andshe was about to spend her fourthChristmas inside those walls. Thatis, until last week. Shanice was the longest resident of the Associated Humane Societies of New Jersey’s Tinton Falls facility. Representatives started campaigning for her adoption as her 1,090th day in the shelter approached, came and went. But a media blitz brought Shanice to the attention of employees of the Jackson-based nonprofit Pitties and Pals Rescue, who decided to change her luck, promoting her cause until finding her “forever family.” A 6-year old terrier mix, has been adopted after spending over three years in the Associated Humane Societies shelter in Tinton Falls. Representatives campaigned for her adoption before the holiday season.Photo by Allison Perrine Papa thought Jules probably spent so long in the Tinton Falls shelter because she was not great with other dogs. “But that can always change. This is a stressful environment, so sometimes it’s hard to tell exactly what they’re going to be like in a home. But we obviously have to be cautious.” The adoption process at The Associated Humane Societies of New Jersey’s Tinton Falls facility requires that interested parties have a copy of a valid driver’s license or state-issued identification available. Homeowners must prove ownership of their home with a tax bill, deed, or the like. Home renters must provide a lease specifically stating that animals are allowed. If it does not say it, a notarized letter must be provided from the landlord. Any adopters who already have dogs must bring them in for a meet-and-greet with the dog looking to be adopted. To learn more, contact the shelter, located at 2960 Shafto Road. Many other dogs are up for adoption as well as cats, chickens, bunnies, pigs and roosters. “We can get anything on a given day,” said Papa. For more information about Associated Humane Societies, visit ahscares.org. According to Humane Societies representative Lindsay Papa, it’s a bit unusual for animals to stay at the Tinton Falls facility for verylong. The average large dog or pitbull is adopted within six monthsto a year, and the average smalldog, puppy or purebred is adoptedwithin two weeks to two months.Dogs have been held in the shelterfor at most two years before this.“It is hard to say. It really is caseby case,” said Papa. “But our smalldogs, puppies and pure breeds gomuch, much faster.” Shanice, now known as Jules and living the home-sweet-home life in Princeton, was originally a stray from Sayreville that came to the shelter Nov. 2, 2016. Multiple employees described her as a nice, easy and happy dog. She loves to play with toys and has a particular fondness for tennis balls, often jumping into toy boxes to find them for herself. Salazar said campaigns foradoption will be made for otheranimals going forward, but not forall. Special attention will be madeto animals that have been abused,have special needs or have been atthe shelter for a long time.last_img read more

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Emphatic victory for DeGale in Canada

first_imgJames DeGale enjoyed an emphatic victory on his North American debut, destroying former world title challenger Sebastien Demers with a second-round knockout in Canada.The Harlesden super-middleweight was on top from the start of the fight at the Hilton Lac Leamy in Gatineau-Ottawa, western Quebec.He hurt Demers in the first round, landing with a host of eye-catching shots, including a cracking uppercut and a hurtful left that had his opponent reeling.Demers, 33, came to the ring with plenty of experience, having faced Arthur Abraham for the IBF middleweight title in 2007 and lost to another ex-world champion, Allan Green, on points in November.But he had no answer to DeGale’s hand-speed and was bloodied around the nose and taking more heavy shots as the barrage continued early in the second.And the end came when a thunderous left uppercut sent a dazed Demers staggering to the floor, where he remained until the referee completed the count.A resounding win in his first outing since December keeps DeGale on course for a possible world title shot later this year.See also:DeGale vows to win world title this yearDeGale to make title defence next monthYTo4OntzOjk6IndpZGdldF9pZCI7czoyMDoid3lzaWphLW5sLTEzNTI0NjE4NjkiO3M6NToibGlzdHMiO2E6MTp7aTowO3M6MToiMyI7fXM6MTA6Imxpc3RzX25hbWUiO2E6MTp7aTozO3M6MjI6Ildlc3QgTG9uZG9uIFNwb3J0IGxpc3QiO31zOjEyOiJhdXRvcmVnaXN0ZXIiO3M6MTc6Im5vdF9hdXRvX3JlZ2lzdGVyIjtzOjEyOiJsYWJlbHN3aXRoaW4iO3M6MTM6ImxhYmVsc193aXRoaW4iO3M6Njoic3VibWl0IjtzOjMzOiJTdWJzY3JpYmUgdG8gb3VyIGRhaWx5IG5ld3NsZXR0ZXIiO3M6Nzoic3VjY2VzcyI7czoyODM6IlRoYW5rIHlvdSEgUGxlYXNlIGNoZWNrIHlvdXIgaW5ib3ggaW4gb3JkZXIgdG8gY29uZmlybSB5b3VyIHN1YnNjcmlwdGlvbi4gSWYgeW91IGRvbid0IHNlZSBhbiBlLW1haWwgZnJvbSB1cywgY2hlY2sgeW91ciBzcGFtIGZvbGRlci4gSWYgeW91IHN0aWxsIGhhdmVuJ3QgcmVjZWl2ZWQgYSBjb25maXJtYXRpb24gbWVzc2FnZSwgcGxlYXNlIGUtbWFpbCBmZWVkYmFja0B3ZXN0bG9uZG9uc3BvcnQuY29tIGFuZCB0ZWxsIHVzIHlvdSB3aXNoIHRvIHN1YnNjcmliZSB0byBvdXIgbmV3c2xldHRlci4iO3M6MTI6ImN1c3RvbWZpZWxkcyI7YToxOntzOjU6ImVtYWlsIjthOjE6e3M6NToibGFiZWwiO3M6NToiRW1haWwiO319fQ== Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Evolution of Flight: A Story Looking for Evidence

first_img4. All praise to natural selection’s engineering perfection:  Perhaps the most jaw-dropping juxtaposition of praise for engineering design and for natural selection can be seen in a recent paper in the CEAS Aeronautical Journal.  First, here’s what Hans Försching and Holger Hennings have to say about the power of evolution:Avian flight is one of the remarkable achievements of vertebrate evolution…. The enigmatical flight of birds with their inimitable flight capabilities has at all times attracted our attention. Flying animals have populated the sky already since more than hundred million years. Here, the birds evolved in their long evolution, from dinosaurs to bipedal feathered flying reptiles, to perfect flight machines of nature. They dominate in exemplary manner the fundamental requirements for an efficient flight—propulsion, aerodynamic lift, flight stability and control, and extreme lightweight construction.  Thus, in the early pioneering time of aircraft design, birds were the pilot instructors of the Homo sapiens in his efforts to realise the ancient human dream to fly, finally with the aid of technical resources.That’s essentially all they had to say about evolution.  But then, in their conclusion, they waxed nearly ecstatic about the design perfection in avian flight:The study demonstrates conclusively, that concealed aeroelastic effects contribute essentially to the marvellous flight capabilities of birds. Certain structural wing asymmetries and specific anatomic peculiarities of the bony wing skeleton play thereby a fundamental role. An extremely precise coordination of the complex wing beat motions, together with a perfect flight guidance and control performance, are additional basic requirements for an efficient active flight. The birds dominate all of these requisites in a masterly manner. In a flight-mechanical control circuit, the large flight muscles, and many others in the wing, serve as actuators, the extremely marked sense organs act as flight sensors, and the extremely developed cerebellum takes the function of a computer as guidance and control centre. These biological elements communicate with lightning speed like an autopilot as a biotechnical marvel with unimaginable precision. Thus, the birds can precisely adjust and control their flight in all styles and situations without flow separation in a stable flight-mechanical and aeroelastic equilibrium. With their spectacular flight capabilities, birds are really the inimitable flight artists of nature. They are equipped with unique flight skills, all mysteries of which are obviously still not yet completely known.No Darwinian aftertaste in that paragraph.Darwinists are a club of ideologues whose mission is to maintain a naturalistic “scenario” at all costs, even if it means committing various evolutionary no-no’s, such as (1) Recapitulation Theory, (2) Lamarckism, (3) Just-So Storytelling, and other no-no’s for general science like (4) big lie, (5) half-truth, (6) non-sequitur, (7) card stacking, etc. (see all the tricks of the trade in the Baloney Detector).  Observations are mere props to keep their story going.  It’s not that they are blind to the evidence; they are without excuse, because it is clearly seen all around them (Romans 1:16-25), even overhead in a passing flock of birds.  Because they know design in their hearts, they hate everyone who points it out.  Pray for them. 2. Composite explanations:  A very confident-sounding article by Michael Balter in Science Magazine on Nov. 2 was titled, “Flying Dinos and Baby Birds Offer New Clues About How Avians Took Wing.”  It began,Most scientists agree that birds are living dinosaurs, survivors of the mass extinction that did in all other dinos at the end of the Cretaceous period 65 million years ago. Birds are also the result of a remarkable series of evolutionary events that transformed dinosaurs from mighty masters of the land into light and feathery lords of the skies. At a meeting of vertebrate paleontologists here last month, researchers pondered fresh clues about the origins of flight from studies of feathered dinosaurs and baby birds.The “most scientists agree” statement is, of course, a mere appeal to authority and bandwagon arguments.  Discounting those, what evidence did Balter present?  The said “baby birds” are none other then Ken Dial’s partridge family chicks he’s been promoting for nearly a decade (see (1/16/2003, 12/22/2003, 5/01/2006, 1/25/2008, 6/26/2011). Critics could argue that looking for evolutionary clues from living birds is a throwback to Haeckel’s Recapitulation Theory (2/18/2011#4,  10/31/2012), a technical foul in modern evolutionary theorizing.  And since bird chicks come with the genetic program to make them extend their wings in preparation for a life of flight, it would seem nothing could be said about how unobservable dinosaurs behaved – and even if they extended their flightless arms, a mechanism that doesn’t get the genetic mutation for this behavior into the gametes could be criticized as Lamarckian.Other than that, Balter’s report included a dispute about whether Microraptor was a flyer or glider, or a transitional form from dromeosaurs at all.  Apparently it had enough equipment to fly fairly well, whether or not it had the same turning radius as some modern birds.  Kevin Padian entered the fray to criticize the arboreal (tree-down) taint of the discussion.  He claims the debate ended in favor of the cursorial (ground-up) theory when none other than Ken Dial introduced his “wing-assisted incline running” hypothesis (WAIR) with the partridge family.  Thomas Holtz thought that makes “evolutionary sense” because “there would have been selective pressure to ascend into the trees and then get out of them once you got up there.”  No evidence was cited that it really happened that way.Ashley Heers came prepared to respond to criticisms that WAIR conjures up the ghost of Recapitulation Theory – but did she succeed?In Raleigh, Dial’s graduate student Ashley Heers argued in a widely applauded talk that paleontologists should search for clues to the origins of flight by studying the stages that young birds go through as they begin to fly. Although the 19th century idea that “ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny” has been widely discredited, Heers said, many young animals do retrace key evolutionary steps between birth and adulthood. For example, she argued, young birds such as chukars, a member of the partridge family, have many features that are typical of extinct carnivorous dinosaurs but are not present in adult birds. They include unfused thoracic vertebrae and a small pelvis and very small keel, an extension of the sternum that protrudes outward from the ribs. Young chukars and other juvenile birds also have symmetrical feathers that give way to asymmetrical ones in adult birds, a pattern that reflects differences between early and later feathered dinosaurs. And Heers and Dial have documented wing-assisted incline running in baby chukars; although they cannot yet fly, if their wings are clipped or blocked, their ability to run up inclines is greatly reduced.This sounds like she rebuked Recapitulation Theory only to embrace it.  If she had a response to the fact that baby birds have a genetic program to fly, while dinosaurs did not, Balter didn’t report it.  Yet her presentation was “widely applauded,” he did notice.3. Heavy-set pre-birds:  Other than mentioning imaginary feathers, another article on Science Daily avoided the question of the origin of flight while undermining a different evolutionary assumption: the idea that bigger is better.  “For Some Feathered Dinosaurs, Bigger Not Always Better,” the headline reads. The falsifiable notion in question was whether diet contributed to dinosaur size.  “Now researchers have started looking at why dinosaurs that abandoned meat in favor of vegetarian diets got so big, and their results may call conventional wisdom about plant-eaters and body size into question.”“The largest feathered dinosaurs were more than 100 times more massive than your average person,” says Zanno. “The reality is that for most of us, it is downright difficult to imagine a feathered animal of gigantic proportions.“Apparently it takes a scientist who has practiced imagination to get good at it.  Anyway, a simplistic, clear-cut “evolutionary advantage” toward larger size disappeared in the data.   “They found that these theropod groups were experimenting with different body masses as they evolved, with some getting bigger, while others were getting smaller,” the article anthropomorphized.  “In short, there was no clear-cut drive to get big — size seemed to provide no overwhelming advantage during the evolution of these animals.”  Flight was certainly not on their experimental curriculum. An evolutionary dogma is that land dinosaurs evolved into flying birds.  When the claims are acid-washed with critical analysis, what evidence remains?1. Early bird tryouts:  One claim going around now is that Archaeopteryx and other “early birds” were poor flyers, implying that they were transitional forms to falcons and hummingbirds that later progressed to perfect the art of flight.  PhysOrg, for instance, titled a recent article “Early birds had an old-school version of wings.”  Complete with artwork that makes them look awkward, the article is based on analysis of fossils of Archaeopteryx and Anchiornis by Nicholas Longrich of Yale, who examined the feathers and decided they were “configured differently” thereby showing progressive evolution: “Now it’s clear that early birds were more primitive and represented transitional forms linking birds to dinosaurs.”  Other than saying so, what did he find?  “We can see the wing slowly becoming more advanced as we move from Anchiornis, to Archaeopteryx, to later birds.”  OK, but what were his criteria for ranking them?“Archaeopteryx has this weird design with multiple layers of long flight feathers,” Longrich said. “The dinosaur Anchiornis has tons of simple, strip-like feathers that overlap—the only bird that has anything remotely similar is a penguin.“That means that early wings probably worked effectively as simple airfoils for gliding, and perhaps for very primitive flapping flight at high speeds, the researchers say. But the feathers on those wings couldn’t separate and twist in the way they do in a modern bird. Low-speed flight and ground takeoff may have been difficult, or even impossible, for them.But penguins are very advanced birds with feathers well adapted to their habitat.  On what basis can Longrich say that these individuals either had specialized feathers for their needs, or represented degenerate stages of feathers, as seen in some modern flightless birds?  Instead, he built a progression from feathers on dinosaurs for warmth, then for display, then for gliding, then for flying, without providing the dates or locations that would illustrate an actual progression.Moreover, he had to tweak the rates of evolution to keep the story flying: “The researchers propose that the wing feather arrangement seen in modern birds may have evolved within a period spanning perhaps a few tens of millions of years and then remained largely unchanged for the last 130 million years.” That seems a case of special pleading, but Nature News gave the work a short, positive statement, and so did Live Science.Longrich’s original paper appeared in Current Biology, where he and his team proclaimed, “The avian wing represents one of natural selection’s most remarkable inventions” and praised it profusely.  After presenting his transitional sequence, though, problems entered to confuse the picture:There are a number of issues that complicate this scenario. First, the phylogenetic positions of Archaeopteryx and Anchiornis remain uncertain. Most studies recover Archaeopteryx and Anchiornis as successive outgroups to modern birds, but a recent analysis suggests that Archaeopteryx and Anchiornis may be more closely related to the Deinonychosauria. If so, this would require that either the long, asymmetrical remiges shared by Archaeopteryx and modern birds were acquired convergently, or that the short and symmetrical remiges of Anchiornis are derived. It could also mean that the multitiered feather arrangement is derived for an Archaeopteryx-Deinonychosauria clade, rather than primitive. Further complicating the scenario presented here is the fact that the dromaeosaurid Microraptor gui also has the long, asymmetrical primaries seen in Archaeopteryx and Neornithes (the morphology of the coverts, however, remains unknown for Microraptor). Microraptor may have independently evolved the advanced feather morphology, or again, Anchiornis may represent a reversal. It is also possible that the derived morphology of the remiges seen in Archaeopteryx and Microraptor is primitive for Paraves, and that Anchiornis actually lies outside of this clade. To resolve these conflicts, we require both a better understanding of maniraptoran phylogeny and new information on the plumage of basal maniraptorans such as Protarchaeopteryx and Caudipteryx.Curiously, the news articles failed to mention these potentially falsifying problems.  Longrich also entertained a “punctuated equilibria” evolutionary scenario: rapid development of flight, followed by 130 million years of stasis.  So: all that can be said, based on the evidence is this: “Regardless of the precise scenario invoked, it is clear that Archaeopteryx and nonavian dinosaurs have a wing feather organization that differs from that of modern birds.”  If the evidence is that limiting, other “scenarios” could accept these differences without invoking progress sequence from dinosaur to bird.Then, shockingly, he compared bird evolution to airline engineering, and claimed they are similar:Strikingly, a pattern of stasis is found in manmade aircraft as well: following rapid advances in aircraft design in the early 20th century, progress slowed in later decades, such that many aircraft designed in the mid-20th century still operate. The processes behind the evolution of vertebrate wings and aircraft wings may be the same. The constraints imposed by fluid mechanics mean that a relatively small number of possible wing configurations are effective airfoils; once these geometries are discovered either by natural selection or aeronautical engineering, only small refinements are possible.The irony was apparently lost on Longrich’s team that engineers work by intelligent design, not by natural selection.  If the constraints of physics mean only working machinery will fly, how could he claim that natural selection is capable of what engineers took decades of intelligent planning to execute?  The popular science articles left this flawed argument from analogy out, too.center_img (Visited 78 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Olympic meet ‘reaffirms SA’s status’

first_imgThe successful hosting of the Fifa World Cup 2010 provided an opportunity for Africa to be repositioned as a destination of choice for tourism and emerging market investment. “Given the divisions of the past, sport remains an important vehicle through which to unite South Africans and develop communities,” Matola said. “Having the IOC in the country is also an affirmation that the government supports all sporting codes, even though football, rugby and cricket attract so much attention.” Reputational boost for South Africa Sentimentally important will be a reception during the period of the IOC meeting marking the marriage of IOC member Prince Albert of Monaco and the South African Olympic swimmer Charlene Wittstock. Expertise in hosting events 4 July 2011 The highlight of the 2011 IOC meeting will be the July 6th announcement of the winning bid to host the 2018 Winter Olympics. The three bidding cities, Munich (Germany), Annecy (France) and PyeongChang (South Korea) are expected to bring huge bid delegations. At least 2 500 top world sport administrators, royalty, government leaders and media are expected to descend on this coastal city for the biggest biannual meeting of leaders in global sport. “The overwhelmingly positive international coverage of the World Cup countered Afro-pessimism and South Africa surpassed even the most optimistic expectations. The reputational boost that was generated will be felt for years to come.” The choice of South Africa for the 2011 IOC session reaffirms the recognition of the country’s expertise in hosting global sporting events and its emerging economic status, Matola said. Affirmation of support for sport Later this year, the country is scheduled to host COP 17, the largest gathering of world leaders and civil organisations to discuss climate change. “There are huge expectations around this meeting, and all eyes of the world will once again be on South Africa,” the IMC said.center_img Since 1994, South Africa has hosted several major international sporting events, including the Rugby World Cup in 1995, African Cup of Nations in 1996, the Cricket World Cup in 2003, the Women’s World Cup of Golf annually between 2005 and 2008 and last year’s Fifa World Cup, the first ever hosted on African soil. This is the first time in the 117 years of the IOC – since the very first session in Paris, France back in 1894 – that the event is being hosted in Africa. “As a proud host country for the 2010 Fifa World Cup, South Africa delivered a truly memorable and world-class African tournament, as the world experienced Africa’s rich diversity and imbibed in the spirit of ‘ubuntu’; which relates to humanity’s interconnectedness,” said Matola. Brand ambassadors for SA “We welcome the delegates and guests to the 123 general session of the IOC,” Miller Matola, CEO of the International Marketing Council of SA (IMC), said in a statement on Monday. “The hosting of such a great event will make a direct contribution to tourism revenue and we are confident that the experience of delegates in South Africa will turn them into brand ambassadors for the country.” The IOC session will put the focus again on the Olympic sporting codes and will provide an opportunity for South Africans to interact with the IOC leadership and prominent athletes. “The international Olympic movement played a major role in isolating the apartheid state before 1992 and readmitted the country to international participation two years before the formal transition to the democratic state in 1994. For South Africa, the hosting of global events is an opportunity to boost the economy and create jobs. The country actively pursues such opportunities, and already, 200 meetings and conferences have been secured over the next five years. This is expected to boost revenue by R1.6-billion. South Africa again takes centre stage in the hosting of a global sporting event when it hosts the International Olympic Committee’s (IOC) 123rd Session in Durban from 4 to 9 July. SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Think For Yourself

first_imgI have written 3,925 posts here since starting this little venture, and what is indeed a labor of love. I have also written three books, recorded over 300 YouTube videos, and recorded over 100 podcasts. I have shared my thoughts, ideas, and opinions with people who care about sales, selling, leadership, success, and doing meaningful work.Dozens of times I have revised my beliefs and opinions, writing posts and pointing to the fact that my views have changed based on new information and experiences. I have been called to account for the conflicts between earlier work and later work, but if you don’t change what you believe, you are not growing.I’ve had a few significant disagreements, certainly fewer than the opportunities presented to me, and I should have engaged in more than I did. I’ve let many things go without so much as a response, even when what was written or spoken was done so only to provoke, lacking any gravity. It’s always possible to take the high road, especially when one realizes that words from relative strangers can do one no harm, but can undoubtedly amuse.Which brings me to the point of this dispatch.As you wander around the internet, reading, listening, and watching content produced by others, decide for yourself what you believe to be good and right and true.One of the most significant changes, perhaps the greatest, in the last few decades has been the elimination of the gatekeepers when it comes to publishing, whether it be blog posts, articles, news commentary, videos, movies, films, or anything else that might pass as art.One of the most dangerous changes, and in some ways equally great, has been the elimination of gatekeepers. Anyone can write or record anything and publish it with no real controls. Because the vetting processes are absent, poor ideas of even poorer quality proliferate as fast or faster than good ideas. When one wants attention, the idea need only provoke, and where titles and headlines were once clickbait, what follows is mostly banal and vapid.As you consume content, you might think of it the same way you consider what you eat or drink, as something that you are taking into your mind in the same way you take things into your body. You might discriminate, asking yourself if you believe what you take in is good and right and true. You might question whether the idea conflicts with what you know to be true, whether it makes sense, or whether it is folly. More still, you might ask if the idea serves you—or whether it was written to serve its creator.Read, and especially read widely. But while doing so, it is critical that you think for yourself. Consider ideas and judge them for yourself.Moreover, treat the content you read here following the guidance in the paragraphs above. Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

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