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Swanson: Domestic Violence A Concern As COVID-19 Crisis Continues

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),Help from the criminal justice system,you say….you let my felony stalker free as an FN corona spore…..I was delayed 6mths for my chance to see justice served…and never talked to you.we never even met.you let him stalk me,drug me,spit on me,and ultimately I was tossed like a china corpse,and knocked out…hed been arrested 30x in 6yrs for these same acts,and worse.n you set him free,whilst my ptsd keeps me isolated before this crap took over the world….THEY DONT CALL IT >CRIMINAL< JUSTICE《 FOR NOTHING.Our system is a farce,and heads up people,Jamestown has it's own Bill Cosby,n not the funny sweater,jello bill….the evil, sinister bill…..the real Bill….he is out there. Dont believe me,ask the Anew Center. MAYVILLE – Chautauqua County District Attorney Patrick Swanson says domestic violence is a specific problem that he’s concerned about as the global COVID-19 crisis continues.“These are high stressed times where people are going to struggle with their mental health,” Swanson said during a recent interview with WNYNewsNow. “That struggle with mental health, along with it comes strain at home. I just hope people can stay level headed. If someone is violating the law, I hope that person being abused is able to call and get protection from law enforcement and seek help from the criminal justice system.”The county’s chief prosecutor says the pandemic will cause a drop in crime throughout the county this year.“When people are being out and about, and businesses being open, those things breed the opportunity for people to commit criminal acts,” Swanson said. “When you’ve got the majority of people staying home, and the majority of businesses being closed, the opportunity to commit crime is far less. We’re going to see a dip in crime this year because of (the pandemic).” last_img read more

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National Grid Prepares For This Afternoon’s Severe Weather

first_imgNational Grid encourages customers to be prepared for severe weather, and to keep safety a priority with the following reminders:Electricity & Generator SafetyCustomers can go online to report an outage to National Grid.Never touch downed power lines; always assume they are carrying live electricity. Downedlines should immediately be reported to National Grid at 1-800-867-5222 or by calling 911.Generators used to supply power during an outage must be operated outdoors toprevent the buildup of deadly carbon monoxide. Before operating a generator, be sure to disconnect from National Grid’s system by shutting off the main breaker, located in the electric service panel. Failure to do this could endanger our crews and your neighbors.Customers who depend on electrically powered life support equipment, such as a respirator, should register as a life support customer by calling National Grid at 1-800-642- 4272. In a medical emergency, always dial 911.Keep working flashlights and extra batteries handy and be sure to charge all electronic devices before the storm.Please use caution when driving near emergency responders and crews restoring power.Be sure to check on elderly family members, neighbors and others who may need assistance during an outage.Customers with active electricity accounts can text ‘REG’ to NGRID (64743) to have personalized alerts sent to them via text, email or phone when we detect outage s on their properties.Customers also can text ‘OUT’ to 64743 to report an outage.For real-time power outage information, online outage reporting, and in-depth storm safety information, visit National Grid’s Outage Central website. Customers who create online profiles also can register for email alerts. “National Grid is closely monitoring this afternoon’s weather forecast, which calls for potential scattered severe thunderstorms, accompanied by strong winds and heavy rain throughout portions of Western New York” read the statement.“The most severe weather is expected in the western most tip of the state and is predicted to stretch northward along the shores of Lake Erie and Lake Ontario.” Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)center_img BUFFALO – National Grid said they are prepared to respond to potential weather-related power outages this afternoon and tonight.In a statement, National Grid spokesperson David Bertola said they are keeping their eyes on conditions and crews are at the ready to respond should severe weather disruption service across the area.last_img read more

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County Reports Progress In Restoring Clean Water To Mayville Residents

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Chautauqua County Health Department Public Health Technician, Casey Miller, collects water samples to test for PFNA from the sampling station located at the village of Mayville’s water storage tank. (Image by the Chautauqua County Health Department.)MAYVILLE – Chautauqua County Health officials say they are making progress in restoring clean water to Mayville residents. However, public health officials say the “do not drink” advisory issued last week remains in effect.They say a new water well was installed on Monday and is currently supplying the Village’s water system with clean water.The Village is now flushing the system and replacing the water in the storage tank. Officials say this will continue for the next few days. Soon residents will be instructed to flush their household plumbing once the water system flushing is complete.They say discolored, cloudy water, may be noticed as this occurs.The health department is reaching out to those with private wells to make sure their water is safe to drink.Until water is safe, the village continues daily distribution of bottled and bulk water to residents, businesses and the Chautauqua Lake Central School.There are several upcoming distribution events including Wednesday to Friday from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at the Chautauqua Highway Building.Water is also available at the Tops parking lot Friday from 2:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.last_img read more

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Behind the Curtain of Act One! Chart Moss Hart’s Extraordinary Journey

first_img Act One Gets a New Chapter Now, 74 years after Hart’s first Broadway hit, James Lapine (Into the Woods, Sunday in the Park with George) directs his own adaptation of this ode to the theater, starring Tony Shalhoub, Santino Fontana and Andrea Martin. “The book is so iconic,” Lapine told Broadway.com. “It’s such a love letter to our theater, our world and our profession. It seemed like a natural—I wanted to bring it to life.” The Lincoln Center Theater production opens on April 17 at the Vivian Beaumont Theater. Places, everyone! Kitty’s Out of the Bag Kitty Carlisle Hart spent her life protecting the legacy of her late husband, which included keeping the diary he kept from 1953-54— written during one of his many bouts of crippling depression and writer’s block—under wraps until after her death. When she passed away in 2007, the diary, which cast a critical eye on his peers, was made public: Greta Garbo? “Old and pinched.” Dorothy Parker? “Bitter and acid.” Audrey Hepburn? “Absolutely ruthless.”  Santino Fontana And the Award Goes To… Of their many collaborations, Hart and Kaufman’s greatest success was the play You Can’t Take It With You. The pair won the 1937 Pulitzer Prize for drama, and a berjillion high school and regional theater productions were born. A year after their big literary win, Hart and Kaufman adapted the play for the silver screen. Starring Jimmy Stewart and Lionel Barrymore and directed by Frank Capra, You Can’t Take It With You won the 1938 Academy Award for Best Picture. Keep ‘Em Coming At only 26 years old, Hart was dubbed “the Prince of Broadway” by columnist Leonard Lyons. Hart and Kaufman would go on to write shows like Merrily We Roll Along, I’d Rather Be Right and The Man Who Came to Dinner. Hart was just as prolific after their 10-year partnership ended; he would later write with Irving Berlin (Face the Music, As Thousands Cheer), and on his own (Lady in the Dark), direct My Fair Lady (for which he won his only Tony Award) and Camelot, and pen such screenplays as Gentleman’s Agreement and the Judy Garland vehicle A Star is Born. Chance of a Lifetime At age 24, Hart wrote Once in a Lifetime, a satire of the film industry’s harried transition to talkies. It attracted the attention of producer Sam H. Harris, who agreed to take it on if Hart would rework it with George S. Kaufman—a big yes for Hart, who had long admired the legendary playwright. The process took six months, and was still in bad shape during out-of-town tryouts, but in 1930, Once in a Lifetime opened on Broadway to rave reviews. As Hart tells the story, he went straight to his family’s dingy home in Sea Gate, Brooklyn, and whisked everyone away to live at the Ansonia Hotel in Manhattan. So ends Act One the book, but there was much more to come from Hart himself. Hey, Big Spender By 1943, Hart had made over a million dollars. Of Hart’s country estate, a houseguest once supposedly said, “It shows you what God would have done if he’d had the money.” Among the luxuries he owned? An electric toothbrush, air conditioners, televisions, radio-phonographs for piping music around his houses (remember: 1943), elephant tusks, a collection of star sapphires, and “a pair of red doeskin slacks marked down to a hundred dollars at an Abercrombie & Fitch sale,” according to The New Yorker. Falling In Love, Literally Hart met actress and singer Kitty Carlisle on the set of the Marx Brothers’ A Night at the Opera, where he was looking for a leading lady. Carlisle heard that Hart wanted to meet her, and ran so fast that she fell in a heap at his feet. He didn’t cast her. The two didn’t meet again until many years later at a party at Lillian Hellman’s house, and were married on August 10, 1946. Was Hart In the Closet? Given his lengthy bachelor period, rumors had long circulated about Hart’s sexuality. These rumors were raised in a 1993 New Yorker interview with Kitty, who said that she’d asked him outright while they were dating, “Are you homosexual?” He answered, “absolutely not.” Kitty said she “never gave it another thought.” Hart’s biographer Steven Bach, however, put it this way: “If sex was one of his demons, it was one he seemed able to control.” Related Shows Act One Tony Shalhoub Get ready for a little Broadway on Broadway! Act One is based on the autobiography of famed playwright, director and storyteller Moss Hart, which chronicles his astonishing rise from poverty to his first Broadway hit (of many) in 1930. Don’t worry, this isn’t a dry history play—Hart always had an ear for drama and told his story in the most glamorous, theatrical way possible. Read on below for a look at the life of one of Broadway’s greats, and find out how his iconic showbiz memoir went from page to stage at Lincoln Center, starring Santino Fontana, Tony Shalhoub and Andrea Martin. Fake It ‘Til You Make It To support his impoverished family, Hart dropped out of school—at 14, he got a job in the storage vault of a wholesale furrier. After toiling away for two years, Hart finally got to Broadway (near, anyway) when he landed a job as an office boy to producer Augustus Pitou, Jr. The young assistant sneakily submitted his first play, The Beloved Bandit, to Pitou under a pen name. It was such a disastrous flop, the ordeal ended up costing the producer $45,000. Hart was fired. Curtain Up: Humble Beginnings Though Moss Hart liked to joke that he was born on “the wrong end” of Fifth Avenue, he was actually born in a tenement at 74 E. 105th Street in 1904, growing up in “an atmosphere of unrelieved poverty,” according to The Life and Times of Moss Hart. His eccentric Aunt Kate, who would pull him out of school to see matinees, gave Hart his love of the theater. In Act One, Hart writes that she died while he was out of town with his first play, The Beloved Bandit—in reality, she became mentally unstable and plagued Hart in his later life, including allegedly setting fires backstage at his Broadway show Jubilee. You Really Can’t Take It With You Act One was a colossal hit when it was published in 1959; Time magazine called it “one of the best memoirs of this or any other theatrical generation.” Though Hart ended his memoir with the phrase “Intermission,” he never got a chance to write his own second act. He died of a heart attack on December 20, 1961 at the age of 57. The Film Was a Flop In 1963, a film adaptation of Act One was released, directed by Hart’s longtime friend Dore Schary, and starring George Hamilton as Hart and Jason Robards as Kaufman. While Bosley Crowther of The New York Times acknowledged Schary’s good intentions, he still called it “a picture of a patent-leather dullard trying to peddle and then rewrite a play with the help of a cranky old codger who is almost as dull as he.” Ouch! Show Closed This production ended its run on June 14, 2014 View Comments Andrea Martin Star Fileslast_img read more

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Don’t Tell Mama! Taylor Swift Visits Cabaret Star Emma Stone

first_img Related Shows View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on March 29, 2015 Cabaret After her appearance at the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show, Taylor Swift hightailed it to New York City to see Cabaret on December 9! The singer-songwriter wouldn’t miss seeing her pal Emma Stone’s new gig—the screen star is playing Sally Bowles in the Tony-winning revival. After the show, Swift posted these adorable shots to Instagram with the caption: “Got to see Emma Stone KILL IT in Cabaret last night! Every new project she takes on is even more excellent than her last and it has inspired me since the day I met her 7 years ago.” Aww, Taylor, you’re the best friend a gal could have! (Please be our best friend. Also, please star in a Broadway show soon.) Check out these adorable shots (featuring some of Stone’s interesting nose dressing-room decor), then see Cabaret live!last_img read more

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The Fans Have Spoken! Readers Rank the Best Patti LuPone Roles of All Time

first_img EVA PERON IN EVITA NORMA DESMOND IN SUNSET BOULEVARD ROSE IN GYPSY View Comments RENO SWEENEY IN ANYTHING GOES FANTINE IN LES MISERABLES GENEVIEVE IN THE BAKER’S WIFEcenter_img Two-time winner Patti LuPone is one of the most celebrated leading ladies on Broadway—and from her hilarious appearances on 30 Rock, Girls and Will & Grace to her heartfelt turn on Life Goes On, she has a practically endless list of big and small screen credits. But which Patti LuPone role is the crème de la crème? We asked you to rank your favorites on Culturalist—here’s what came out on top! MARIA CALLAS IN MASTER CLASS MRS. LOVETT IN SWEENEY TODD JOANNE IN COMPANY LUCIA IN WOMEN ON THE VERGElast_img read more

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Stephen Adly Guirgis’ Between Riverside and Crazy Wins 2015 Pulitzer Prize

first_img View Comments Stephen Adly Guirgis’ Between Riverside and Crazy has been awarded the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. The show was described by the Pulitzer jury as a “nuanced, beautifully written play about a retired police officer faced with eviction that uses dark comedy to confront questions of life and death.” The play was chosen over finalists Marjorie Prime by Jordan Harrison and Father Comes Home from the Wars (Parts 1, 2, 3) by Suzan-Lori Parks. Guirgis will receive a prize of $10,000.Between Riverside and Crazy tells the story of Walter “Pops” Washington, an ex-cop and recent widower, who, with his recently paroled son Junior, struggle to hold on to one of the last rent-stabilized apartments on Riverside Drive. The old days seem to be dead and gone for the two as old wounds are opened, sketchy new houseguests turn up and a final ultimatum is delivered. The play premiered at off-Broadway’s Atlantic Theater Company last summer and recently ran at Second Stage.Though Guirgis is the ultimate multi-hyphenate—he’s a writer, director, actor, educator and former co-artistic director of LAByrinth Theater Company—he is best known for his visceral and engaging plays. These include the Tony-nominated The Motherf*cker with the Hat (his only Broadway credit), Our Lady of 121st Street, In Arabia, We’d All Be Kings, Jesus Hopped the ‘A’ Train and many more. Check out Broadway.com’s exclusive interview with him here.The 2014 recipient of the Award was Annie Baker’s The Flick.last_img read more

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Odds & Ends: Baby on the Way for Amanda Seyfried & Thomas Sadoski & More

first_img View Comments Thomas Sadoski & Amanda Seyfried(Photo: Bruce Glikas) Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today. Baby on the Way for Amanda Seyfried & Thomas SadoskiHappy news for these stars of stage and screen! Amanda Seyfried is expecting a baby with her fiancé, Tony nominee Thomas Sadoski, the New York Post reports. The mommy and daddy-to-be met when they appeared together in Neil LaBute’s The Way We Get By off-Broadway last year and got engaged in September. Congratulations to the happy couple!Showtime Cancels Masters of SexThe Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan-led Masters of Sex series, which featured Tony winner Annaleigh Ashford, has been canceled, Deadline writes. The fourth season recently ended its run on Showtime; we look forward to seeing what all involved with the period drama do next!Get Tappy for the Holidays With the Dames at SeaWhat better way to usher in that most wonderful time of the year than with the Dames at Sea tapping in holiday outfits? Check out below as Broadway.com vlogging queen Lesli Margherita, Mara Davi, Eloise Kropp and more Main Stem favorites get into the seasonal spirit with Christopher Rice (The Book of Mormon).last_img read more

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The Public Theater’s Joan of Arc: Into the Fire Extends Again

first_img Joan of Arc: Into the Fire This Broadway.com Save the Date pick seems to be popular! Joan of Arc: Into the Fire, which was extended prior to its world premiere at the Public Theater, has extended its run again. Penned by Oscar and Grammy winner David Byrne and directed by Tony nominee Alex Timbers, the off-Broadway musical began performances on February 14 with Jo Lampert in the titular role. Opening night is scheduled for March 15, and the engagement will now run through April 30. (The show was originally set to close on April 2 before being extended until April 16 prior to its first performance.)The cast also includes Emmy winner and Tony and Oscar nominee Mare Winningham, Terence Archie, James Brown III, Jonathan Burke, Rodrick Covington, Sean Allan Krill, Mike McGowan, Adam Perry, John Schiappa, Kyle Selig, Michael James Shaw, Dimitri Joseph Moïse and Mary Kate Morrissey.This one-of-a-kind rock musical concert from the creative team of Here Lies Love explores the meteoric rise of Joan of Arc, who spoke to God, built a nation and was executed for it. Jo Lampert(Photo: Tammy Shell) View Commentscenter_img Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on April 30, 2017last_img read more

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Dress for Safety

first_img* Pre-rinse heavily contaminated clothing outside with a hose. Or soak them in a bucket,or use the pre-rinse cycle on the washer. * After laundering, run the empty washer through a complete cycle with hot water anddetergent to remove residue. * Line-dry clothing whenever possible. Air and sunshine help break down pesticideresidue. Residue can build up inside the dryer and contaminate the following loads. “After using pesticides, remove your clothing and launder them separately from otherclothing,” Hibbs said. “Wash your hands and any exposed skin promptly and thoroughlywith soap and water.” If you’re using pesticides in granular form, she said, wear a long-sleeved shirt, long pants,socks and shoes. For liquid pesticides with “caution” on the label, wear the same itemsplus rubber or chemical-resistant gloves. For products with “warning” or “danger” on thelabels, add eye protection. The safety glasses should include front, brow and templeprotection. Always launder pesticide-contaminated clothes before wearing them again, Hibbs said.Take other safety steps in the laundry room. * Wash only a few garments at a time. Use hot water, a full water level and a normalwashing cycle. Rewash heavily contaminated clothing two or three times without dryingbetween washings. Wash them separately from other clothes. After using liquid pesticides, follow the same cleanup instructions and rinse your glovesbefore you remove them. If any of your clothes are saturated with chemicals, remove themand shower. “The dress code and cleaning instructions are the same whether you’re spraying a fewweeds in the yard or spraying acres of crops,” Hibbs said. It’s that time of year again. The flowers and trees are all coming back to life. And so arethe weeds. * Use heavy-duty detergent and increase the recommended amount by a fourth. Don’t usebleach or ammonia. Avoid chemical reactions. “If you’re pregnant, please be extremely careful handling pesticide-contaminated clothing,”Hibbs said. “Many people take for granted the clothing aspect of pesticide application,” said JudyHibbs, a family and consumer scientist with the University of Georgia Extension Service.”But it’s very important for your safety.” * Store the pesticide-contaminated items in a container outside or separate from the otherlaundry. For heavily contaminated clothing, wear gloves while working with them. If your response to the weeds is to grab your pesticide sprayer and get to work, slowdown. The weeds can wait while you dress for the occasion. last_img read more

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