Category: fkfsinnakyte

Windies U19 players lift STETHS

first_imgDefending champions St Elizabeth Technical High School (STETHS) hold the upper hand after day one of the Inter-Secondary Schools Sports Association Grace Headley Cup cricket final against Vere Technical at Jamalco Sports Club in Halse Hall, Clarendon, yesterday.Scores: STETHS 201 all out. Vere Technical 11 for two.Both coaches are oozing with confidence ahead of today’s crucial second day, which is set to bowl off at 10 a.m.”We have been champions for years, and we are very confident that we can win again as we have a very experienced set of boys and despite some way to go I think the boys will pull through,” said Clive Ledgister, head coach of STETHS, who are aiming at their 28th overall title and third in a row.After having no action on Tuesday’s opening day due to overnight showers, which affected the wicket, play started at 11 30 a.m. due to a damp area at the bowler’s run-up.Having been sent to bat, openers Okeemo Farquharson and Jordaine Hill batted cautiously, taking the score to 34 before Farquharson was dismissed for 21, caught off the bowling of spinner Ryan Burnett.STETHS lost two more wickets before lunch to be 72 for three at the break, with the experienced Shahid Crooks, on 22 and Michael Frew (yet to score) – both of whom represented the West Indies’ World champion team at the Under 19 World Cup in Bangladesh – at the crease.They added 73 runs for the fourth wicket before Crooks was dismissed for 59 (one four, two sixes), with the score at 145.The defending champions lost two more wickets before the tea break, including that of Frew on the stroke of tea for 49, as they went into the second break at 173 for six. Frew’s knock included four fours and two sixes.STETHS added 27 runs for their final four wickets, with number seven batsman, Rashjni Roye, hitting 21.Demus McPherson was the top bowler for Vere, claiming five for 35, while Andre Stubbs took two for 36 and Ryan Burnett two for 52.When Vere started their reply, pacers Andre McCarthy sent back Alrick Townsend for nought with the score on two, before Crooks dismissed Ronald Edwards, also leg before for two.Despite losing two early wickets, Vere’s head coach, Robert Turner, remains optimistic.”We have lost two early wickets, but the players who have made most of the runs for us this season are yet to go to the crease and we are still confident that we can still pull it off,” said Turner, who is in his first year at the helm as coach of the team.last_img read more

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Equestrian standout wants to spread sport

first_imgJamaica’s top equestrian for 2016 and the continuous face of Jamaica showjumping, Julian Hyde, says his focus for this year will be coaching and bringing new talent to the fore in an effort to give back to the sport.However, he still holds ambitions of qualifying for international championship and representing Jamaica at the highest level in his sport.”I am still with the horses, but right now I am more into coaching the younger riders. We have young riders we are trying to get into the fold, and we are doing the groundwork because we lost a lot of our older riders and we are trying to get new people interested,” he said.”I never saw myself as a coach, but the sport has given me so much over the years and it’s just a way to give back. We have some really good talent out there … and other potential riders to make Jamaica proud,” he added.One of Hyde’s ambitions is to get more youngsters from the wider crosssection of the society more involved in the sport.”For the sport in general, a goal is to get more people interested, not just those from the upper echelons of society, but get everyone interested. So my goal is to spread the word and get it out there so anybody can take a chance.”The last two to three years, we have fell off because the older ones (riders) go away to the US for boarding school. But we still have a good little crop, good facilities and good coaches who bring young riders and get a lot of people interested.”We need to improve facilities, the ringing at Caymanas Park needs work and sand to get it level. Also I would love more international horses in Jamaica, so instead of just horses from track, we would like to get some from overseas,” he added.Hyde, who has won the category award for equestrian at the RJR National Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year Awards on four occasions, returned home last year after five years overseas and is keeping his personal ambitions in tune.”At the same time, I want to pursue my dream. It’s a lot of work, but we are getting it done. And for this year, the goal is to qualify for the 2017 FEI World Finals,” he said. “I will compete and should do well enough to qualify for the finals. We also want to work towards the CAC Games, which is a more realistic goal for us now than the Olympics, but that (CAC) would be a starting point for that (Olympic) journey.”last_img read more

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Van West-Charles admits breaching procurement protocols

first_imgManaging Director of Guyana Water Incorporated (GWI), Dr Richard Van West-Charles has admitted that he had indeed breached the procurement rules at the water utility company.Chairman of GWI Board of Directors Nigel HindsHe made the admission on Saturday during an interview with Guyana Times whilst claiming that Chairman of the Board of Directors, Nigel Hinds, resigned since he could not get his own way.Van West-Charles, said he has learnt of the resignation letter, which he understands was done voluntarily.According to Dr Van West-Charles, he respects the decision of the now former GWI Chairman and wished him well in future, though he was at the time uncertain as to whether Hinds had also resigned as a Director on the Board or was simply relinquishing the Chairmanship.UnilateralResponding to allegations by Hinds that he, as Managing Director was in the habit of abusing his powers, Dr Van West-Charles admitted that he did in fact breached the procurement rules when he ordered the immediate obtaining of safety gear for staff members undertaking work on the sewerage network.The Managing Director is claiming that he breached the rules for the “safety” implications of staff members undertaking such tasks.Addressing the public debate about his attempts to overpower the Board of Directors, Van West-Charles claimed that Hinds’ unilateral actions is that prompted him to solicit legal advice on the powers reposed in not just himself, but the individual members of the Board and the Board as a collective.Guyana Times was told that Hinds essentially could not get his own way, hence the resignation.However, this newspaper has seen a copy of the legal opinion sought by Van West-Charles.In that document prepared by Satram and Satram Law Firm, it was pointed out that the Board’s power as a collective supersedes any individual Director and or managing director.The Board members, he was informed, act and take decisions on behalf of the company’s shareholders – the owners of the company which in this case is the people of Guyana through the State.The legal opinion sought has since advised that the GWI Board of Directors led by a Chairman are empowered to direct the management of the business and affairs of the company.”Directors are generally appointed by the shareholders of the company, and once elected, they are under a duty to act in the best interest of the company when exercising their powers.“Decisions made outside of meetings and by individual Directors are not properly decisions of the Board and may not be binding on the company,” the legal opinion supplied by Satram and Satram Law Firm stated.In fact the legal opinion, pointed out to Van West-Charles that the Directors exercise their powers for the benefit of the company.The legal opinion said too that the powers of the Board are not given to individual Directors but to the Board as a unit since the Board acts collectively.Hinds on Friday confirmed that his resignation letter has been submitted to the Minister with responsibility for the sector, Ronald Bulkan.Rubber stampHinds in his letter – a copy of which was seen by this publication – to the Communities Minister, said “I cannot perform in the best interest of GWI, GWI staff, GWI shareholders and other stakeholders of GWI – as a rubber stamp Chairman of GWI… thus, my resignation.”According to Hinds in his resignation letter, “It is with a deep sense of regret that I resign as Chairman of the Board of Directors of Guyana Water Inc (GWI) with effect from October 26, 2016.”During a brief interview with the newspaper, Hinds said Dr Van West-Charles currently lacks credibility and described the entity’s Managing Director as pernicious and a person who abuses his authority at the water utility.Hinds told Guyana Times that by his actions, he has opted to give the Executive and management some leverage in their future dealings with the entity’s Managing Director.last_img read more

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FLY Prexy Extols Senators

first_imgThe president of the Federation of Liberian Youth (FLY), Augustine Tamba, has lauded the Liberian Senate for the passage of the National Youth Act, which was introduced at the Senate since August 2005. The Youth Act highlights the roles and responsibilities of the youth and how they can engage in activities that promote peace-building in the country.   The National Youth Act was passed by the Liberian Senate on Tuesday, October 7, following the reading of a communication from its committee chair on Youth and Sports, J. Jonathan Barney of Rivercess County.  The communication, which was dated October 3, recommended to that august body to “pass” the Bill, as it was in the interest of the youthful population of the country. Mr. Tamba, commenting further on the Bill, said the concurrence on the part of the senators signals a boost for the young people of the country, as well as a challenge to them to take on leadership roles that promote the future of youths.  In an interview with the Liberia News Agency after the passage of the Youth Act on Tuesday, Tamba indicated that the Act highlights the roles of youths, in ensuring that they take initiatives and promote the spirit of national service, volunteerism, and self-help activities, through equal opportunity, civil responsibility and active participation at all levels.  According to him, the youth of Liberia must see the passage of the Act as a major step forward in addressing the pressing issues confronting youth across the country, as they most often form part of the majority of vulnerable persons.  Tamba cited the high rate of pregnancy among youths between the ages 15 and 19, and unemployment as some of the urgent issues that need redress, as it sometimes exposes the group to danger, something, he said, the Act also seeks to address.  On September 9, 2013, the House of Representatives passed the Act following scrutiny of the document forwarded to the body by its committees on Youth and Sports and Judiciary.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Representative Aspirant ‘Linked’ to Juju Activity, But…

first_imgOne of the representative aspirants of Nimba County Electoral District #4, has been linked to juju activities as the 2017 presidential and legislative elections approach.The Twah River District aspirant, Lawrence Wortuah, said the accusation started weeks ago when the encumbent, Rep. Garrsion Yealue went on a local radio in Karnplay, and accused Wortuah of allegedly bringing a witch doctor to the contested district and also burying alive four roosters at four strategic areas in the district. On the other hand, Wortuah has accused Rep. Yealue of pocketing development money, and has therefore vowed to defeat him at the upcoming poll.The conflict landed in front of the chiefs of the district and a meeting was convened in Sou Kpeahplay Town in what was intended to bring the two men to smoke a peace pipe. The chiefs, without asking for evidence, fined Rep. Yealue L$5000 plus one bag of rice. The chiefs also fined Lawrence Wortuah LS7,500, according to the popular local Radio Kehgheaman (RKFM).In an interview on a local radio station, Rep. Yealue backtracked, saying, “if the case, involving the witch doctor was handled in court, he would have presented his witnesses, but once the chiefs called for harmonization, he has no alternative, but to agree with whatever decision the chiefs rendered.”When contacted via mobile phone on December 5, aspirant Wortuah said he has registered the case with the elders and would not make any comment.The political situation in Nimba County is getting crowded and intense with candidates leveling accusations of juju activities against each other.In the Twah River District alone, over 30 representative aspirants have reportedly declared their intentions to contest for the district’s representative job.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Flaws in Proposed Single Currency Regime

first_imgJohn B. S. Davies, President, LBDI and President, LBABankers’ Association President explainsThe enactment into law by the 53rd Legislature declaring the Liberian dollar as the sole currency of the country and legal tender last Thursday dominated the Liberian National Bar Association’s (LNBA’s) Annual Assembly with John Davies, President of the Liberia Bankers’ Association (LBA), asking for collaborative efforts to prevent its enforcement by the administration of President George Manneh Weah.Mr. Davies, who is also president of the Liberia Bank for Development and Investment (LBDI), argued that if the law were to be enforced by this government, it means the economy will experience “looming crisis.”“We have to join our voices in urging that all stakeholders in the governance, financial and money policy arena prevent the looming crisis the economy will experience should this Act become enforceable,” Mr. Davies said, making a passionate appeal to the LNBA.He continued, “Let us ensure that a strategic and skillful approach is taken in the implementation of this program.”In March 2017, the Liberian government introduced forced de-dollarization through an Act of the Legislature, to amend Part V, Section 19, Sub-section 1 and 2 of the Act establishing the Central Bank of Liberia (CBL) on March 18, 1999.The amendment sought to “declare the Liberian dollar as the sole currency and legal tender.”The Legislature, by the passage of the Act, directed that “prices for all transactions in Liberia shall be solely indicated in Liberian dollars and cents and the Liberian dollar shall also be the sole currency for Accounting, Financial reporting and official purposes and disclosures in the country.”At the same time, the Act sought to maintain the United States dollar as legal tender for the sole discharge of foreign public and private obligations.However, Mr. Davies believes that the use of the Liberian dollar as sole currency will cause local banking institutions to lose relationships with foreign correspondent banks to maintain their offshore accounts (accounts held in foreign banks), which transactions are traded with United States dollars.“Local banks will not be able to pay depositors in the event of a run on the bank for huge United States deposit, owing to the depreciation that dollar deposited may be nationalized,” Mr. Davies said.Moreover, he said that “Credit dollarization will be affected, thus impacting the banks’ balance sheet adversely and creating more non-performing loans.“Some major concession agreements will be affected, especially those with U.S. dollars as contracting currency,” according to Mr. Davies.He continued, “balance of payments deficit will increase and the current pressure on the exchange rate will worsen, leading to further undermining of the CBL’s ability to manage the exchange rate.”Davies further argued that the intent of the Act to retain the U.S. dollar as a legal tender and restrict its usage to settlement of foreign obligations as legislated is legally “ambiguous.”“The LBA and the CBL made clear their grave concerns regarding the forced de-dollarization rather than phased implementation of the process as highlighted in this act,” Mr. Davies said.The ambiguity, he argued, is evidenced by the fact that the Act did not identify any clear methodology for what is meant by foreign obligations for the purpose of transparency.“Did they mean foreign public, foreign private obligations, foreign in terms of foreign designated obligations and vis-a-vis the utilization of the two legal tenders?” Davies wondered.According to him, the Act was not the product of enough consultations between the legislature and economic stakeholders, especially the experts.“The legislature did not note the eventual economic costs of the forced de-dollarization of the Liberian economy with the eventual passage of the Act,” Davies believed.He recounted how, in October 2017, the Liberian dollar has depreciated 21 percent since 2013, and the pace of depreciation has increased since 2016.In order to revitalize the economy, Davies suggested the challenge remains the actualization of policies aimed at economic diversification, increasing investment and improving balance of trade, sustained foreign direct investment, remittances, development of infrastructure and institutions, combating corruption and maintaining political stability and security.“This picture clearly did not support the move to forced de-dollarization,” Mr. Davies disclosed.His argument was centered on the topic “Economic and Financial Impact of Forced De-Dollarization on the Liberian Economy.”Mr. Davies argued that the country’s economy is basically import-oriented and forced dollarization will further exacerbate the liquidity crisis.“There is no guarantee that we will be able to handle the risks factor of the exchange rate, because most forced de-dollarization programs initiated by countries globally have ended with bad economic experiences and virtual re-dollarization. We are aware of the experiences of Mexico and Bolivia, which had a bad outcome of their forced de-dollarization programs,” he said.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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U.S. fee hike plan decried

first_imgEL MONTE – Officials gathered Saturday morning in El Monte to protest a sharp fee increase proposed by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. “A 69 percent fee hike will undoubtedly have a chilling effect on those low-income and working-class immigrants wishing to pursue their dream of becoming an American citizen,” said Assemblyman Mike Eng, D-Monterey Park. “In essence, this proposal equates to a modern day `poll tax.’ What concerns me most is that many immigrants will lose the most fundamental right of all – the right to vote.” Eng joined Rep. Hilda Solis, D-El Monte, and representatives from the Asian Pacific American Legal Center, the Coalition for Humane Immigration Reform of Los Angeles and others at a naturalization workshop held regularly at an El Monte business park to protest the proposed hike, which may go into effect as soon as April. “This change will have many ramifications,” said Solis. “It is important for citizens to contact their congressional representatives in order to vocalize their concerns.” Under the USCIS proposal, the fee for filing Form N-400 for naturalization and citizenship would increase from its current level of $330 to $595, and the fee for FBI background checks from $70 to $80 – the equivalent of a 69 percent hike. Alvaro Huerta, a spokesman for CHIRLA, joined his colleagues urging members of the public to contact the USCIS and elected representatives to voice opposition. “In his recent State of the Union address, the president emphasized the value of upholding the nation’s tradition that welcomes and assimilates new arrivals,” he said. “The USCIS’ proposed fee increase is contrary to the spirit of this tradition. Naturalization benefits our nation as a whole, and immigrants who apply are eager to demonstrate their commitment to this country by becoming full participants in our nation’s civic life.” mary.gurton@sgvn.com (626) 578-6300 Ext. 4461 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img

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Charter school to make cutbacks

first_imgRick de la Torre, a spokesman for the L.A. county education office, said officials there are still evaluating Gorman’s response to the audit. Jesse Barajas, a commission member and principal of a charter school in San Jose, said he voted for the reduced funding level to ensure Gorman administrators take seriously allegations of misconduct. “It really sends the message to them that they really need to have their finances in order,” Barajas said. charlotte.hsu@sbsun.com (909) 386-3882 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! A Redlands-based charter school accused of fiscal mismanagement will implement layoffs and consider campus closures after a state commission decided to award the school 60 percent of the public funding it could have received this year. The Gorman Learning Center will slash staff this month, said Cynthia Markham, the school’s recently hired interim executive director. She added that shuttering one or more of Gorman’s six learning centers – located in Whittier, Pasadena, Redlands, Rancho Cucamonga, Antelope Valley and Santa Clarita – could be a possibility next year. “We need to sit down and go through the entire budget, position by position, and any position that is not absolutely essential to the educational program for children is going to be eliminated immediately,” Markham said Monday. Reductions at Gorman come in response to a decision Friday by the Advisory Commission on Charter Schools, which advises California’s State Board of Education on issues including funding for charters specializing in independent – and home-study. Charters operate using state money, but because they’re meant to foster creativity in education, they’re not subject to many laws governing traditional public schools. An audit requested by the Los Angeles County Office of Education alleged that Gorman claimed $7.7 million in undeserved state funding over three years, and that the school’s former executive director, Waldo Burford, spent public money on items such as alcohol, a $20,000 aquarium and trips to cities where his daughters live. Gorman has contested some of the findings, saying auditors miscalculated the school’s student-teacher ratios and the amount the charter spent on instruction – data that factors into how much state money a school should get. Noting that Burford has resigned, Markham said Gorman will appeal the commission’s decision. last_img read more

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FSJ service project on 98A Avenue meets significant opposition

first_imgProperty owners can expect a letter in the near-future informing them of the results of the petition period. A public meeting was held on February 19, 2015 to provide an overview of the project and answer the questions and concerns of the property owners.“At this meeting, there were concerns raised from some of the property owners because taxable frontage was used for the calculation for the cost estimate per lot rather than actual frontage,” writes Director of Legislative and Administrative Services Janet Prestley.This taxable frontage, according to Prestley, increases the financial burden on property owners, as the defined minimum is 12.2 metres – an average of three metres more than the actual lot size.- Advertisement -The formula for local area service projects – which has the cost of work divided between property owners and the city – has been in place since 2001. It is used to upgrade existing gravel roads to a pavement standard – complete with curb, gutter, catch basins, street lights and sidewalks.“Utilizing this program resulted in many roads being paved in a shorter timeframe than if the city had to budget for the entire project,” writes Prestley.The city had planed to contribute $160,000 for the project – which will now be placed back into its reserve funds to be allocated for a future project.Advertisementlast_img read more

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